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U.S. Rep. Ilhan Omar faced hundreds of protesters Saturday outside a Southern California fundraising event for the local chapter of a major advocacy group representing Muslim-Americans.

“Burn the Quran!," “Ilhan Omar, go to hell!” and “Shame on you, terrorists!" were among some of the messages shouted outside a Woodland Hills hotel where the Minnesota Democrat spoke at a fundraiser for the Council of American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) of Greater Los Angeles, according to a report. The town is about 25 miles northwest of downtown L.A.

The protesters lined a sidewalk area, where they waved Israeli flags and denounced the freshman congresswoman over recent remarks that some have described as anti-Semitic, the Los Angeles Daily News reported. The atmosphere was a mix of dancing and music mixed with the vitriolic comments against Omar, the report said.

REP. ILHAN OMAR’S ‘ANTI-SEMITIC TROPES’ PROMPT JEWISH NEW YORK DEM TO APOLOGIZE TO CONSTITUENTS

Omar, a 37-year-old immigrant from Somalia who came to the U.S. with her family in 1995, has faced a storm of criticism from pro-Israel politicians and groups after her February tweet that said “It’s all about the Benjamins baby,” in reference to the support that some U.S. lawmakers have offered to Israel.

FARRAKHAN TELLS ‘SWEETHEART’ REP. OMAR NOT TO APOLOGIZE FOR ISRAEL COMMENTS

The freshman Democrat drew scorn from Republicans and some in her own party. She later apologized and clarified her criticism of the Israeli government.

“Anti-Semitism is real and I am grateful for Jewish allies and colleagues who are educating me on the painful history of anti-Semitic tropes,” she wrote on Twitter.

“Being opposed to [Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin] Netanyahu and the occupation is not the same as being anti-Semitic," she continued. "I am grateful to the many Jewish allies who have spoken out and said the same."

2020 DEMOCRATIC CANDIDATES CIRCLING WAGONS AROUND ILHAN OMAR AFTER ISRAEL COMMENT UPROAR

A handful of counterprotesters also appeared outside the event to voice support for Omar.

The event at the fourth annual Valley Banquet, titled “Advancing Justice: Empowering Valley Muslims,” was sold out and closed to the public. The Los Angeles Police Department told City News Service that it had an unspecified number of officers working the event.

“We don’t disclose the numbers,” Officer Sal Ramirez told City News Service.

Omar’s visit to Southern California is expected to continue Sunday, as she is scheduled to attend a private meet-and-greet in Irvine, according to a flyer for the event.

Her appearance was one of two political events in the region Saturday. In Los Angeles, U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, a Democratic 2020 presidential candidate, visited a mosque to commemorate the victims of the March 15 mass shooting in New Zealand, the Los Angeles Times reported.

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“Your background is different than mine,” Sanders told about 200 Muslims at the Islamic Center of Southern California. “What a joy it is to share that.”

Later in the day, he spoke to an estimated 12,000 people at a downtown Los Angeles rally.

“As president of the United States, I will not have kind words to say about authoritarian leaders around the world who espouse bigotry and hatred,” Sanders told the crowd. “Together we will make the United States the leader in the world in the fight for democracy and human rights.”

Source: Fox News Politics

A top Senate Democrat on the Judiciary Committee conceded in a conference call with party leaders Saturday that when the special counsel’s principal findings are released by Attorney General William Barr, there may well be cause for celebration among President Trump’s supporters — many of whom have stood by the president for more than two years amid a torrent of unproven allegations that the Trump campaign illegally conspired with Russia in the 2016 election.

"It’s the end of the beginning but it’s not the beginning of the end," Delaware Democrat Sen. Chris Coons said, echoing his party’s strategy of moving forward on to other investigations, including probes into Trump’s financial dealings. "Once we get the principal conclusions of the report," he added later, "I think it’s entirely possible that that will be a good day for the president and his core supporters."

The timing of that potentially good day now seems to be shifting toward Sunday, after sources said a disclosure Saturday of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s primary conclusions in his now-concluded Russia investigation wasn’t expected. A personal lawyer for President Trump said that information was now expected about noon Sunday, though it had earlier been expected on Saturday and the timing remains fluid.

Mueller is not recommending any further indictments as part of his inquiry, which effectively ended Friday, according to a senior Justice Department official.

Fox News is told that Barr may run the conclusions past White House Counsel Pat Cipollone and Emmett Flood, who were in Mar-a-Lago, before they are released — but that Trump’s personal attorneys are unlikely to be notified. It will likely take longer for the facts supporting the conclusions to come out, Fox News is told, because there may be materials that are either classified, or subject to executive privilege in the factual material.

WATCH THE MEDIA MELTDOWN: RACHEL MADDOW BECOMES VISIBLY EMOTIONAL AFTER MUELLER REPORT DROPPED, WITH NO NEW INDICTMENTS

House Democrats planned meetings by phone on Saturday to share what they know about the probe and to discuss how to move forward. Some prominent Democrats are floating the idea of issuing a subpoena to Mueller himself if his report is not made public.

People with signs supporting President Trump are seen from the media van in the motorcade accompanying the president in West Palm Beach, Fla., Friday. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

People with signs supporting President Trump are seen from the media van in the motorcade accompanying the president in West Palm Beach, Fla., Friday. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Fox News is told that impeachment was not mentioned on the Democrats’ conference call. Fox News is told that part of the purpose of the discussion was to signal that just because the Mueller probe is over, that doesn’t mean that the House’s work is over. Democrats also discussed Congress’ oversight role given that a sitting president, under DOJ guidelines, cannot be indicted.

Both parties have pushed the Justice Department to allow lawmakers to publicly discuss the report’s conclusions, once lawmakers have received them from Barr.

The conclusion of Mueller’s probe comes as House Democrats have launched several of their own into Trump and his personal and political dealings.

JEROME CORSI CELEBRATES END OF RUSSIA PROBE, SAYS HE’S VINDICATED IN DECISION TO RESIST MUELLER BULLYING

"It’s the end of the beginning but it’s not the beginning of the end."

— Delaware Democrat Sen. Chris Coons

Democrats have said they have to see the full report from Mueller, including underlying evidence, before they can assess it. Those demands for information are setting up a potential tussle between Congress and the Trump administration that federal judges might eventually have to referee.

Six Democratic committee chairmen wrote in a letter to Barr on Friday that if Mueller has any reason to believe that Trump "has engaged in criminal or other serious misconduct," then the Justice Department should not conceal it.

"The president is not above the law and the need for public faith in our democratic institutions and the rule of law must be the priority," the chairmen wrote.

Attorney General William Barr leaves his home in McLean, Va., on Saturday morning, March 23, 2019. Special counsel Robert Mueller closed his long and contentious Russia investigation with no new charges, ending the probe that has cast a dark shadow over Donald Trump's presidency. (AP Photo/Sait Serkan Gurbuz)

Attorney General William Barr leaves his home in McLean, Va., on Saturday morning, March 23, 2019. Special counsel Robert Mueller closed his long and contentious Russia investigation with no new charges, ending the probe that has cast a dark shadow over Donald Trump’s presidency. (AP Photo/Sait Serkan Gurbuz)

It’s unclear what Mueller has found related to the president, if anything. In his investigation of whether Trump’s campaign coordinated with Russia to sway the 2016 election, Mueller has brought charges against 34 people, including six aides and advisers to the president, and three companies.

But Mueller did not charge any Americans with illegally conspiring with Russians on any matter, including election interference – a foundational reason for the launch of his high-profile probe nearly two years ago.

Supporters of President Donald Trump are seen from the media van in the motorcade accompanying the president in West Palm Beach, Fla., Saturday, March 23, 2019, en route to Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Supporters of President Donald Trump are seen from the media van in the motorcade accompanying the president in West Palm Beach, Fla., Saturday, March 23, 2019, en route to Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Barr testified at his confirmation hearings that he wants to release as much information as he can about the inquiry.

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But anything less than the full report won’t be enough for Democrats — who on Saturday warned that they may soon set their sights on Mueller.

"If the AG plays any games, we will subpoena the report, ask Mr. Mueller to testify, and take it all to court if necessary," said Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney, D-N.Y. "The people deserve to know."

Fox News’ Ed Henry, Mike Emanuel, Brooke Singman, Chad Pergram, Jake Gibson, and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Jokes and memes were abundant on social media after the surprise announcement that Special Counsel Robert Mueller submitted the long-awaited report on suspected Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

Attorney General William Barr notified key congressional leaders in a letter Friday evening that Mueller finished his investigation, adding that a summary of the probe’s findings may be provided to lawmakers as soon as this weekend. The report didn’t recommend any new indictments.

MAINSTREAM MEDIA, CELEBRITIES STUNNED AS MUELLER REPORT FILED WITH NO NEW INDICTMENTS PLANNED

But the Internet went wild after the announcement that the special counsel had ended his two-year investigation that netted some convictions, like former Trump campaign manager Paul Manafort, though appears to have come up short of proving a vast conspiracy to collude with a foreign power.

Many social media users shared edited photos of Mueller finally taking time off and joked about the process of writing the report.

“Robert Mueller at 5:15 today,” wrote one Twitter user, referencing the news that Mueller submitted the report around 5 p.m and superimposing his head on to the infamous picture of Barack Obama relaxing on Richard Branson’s boat shortly after stepping down as president.

Some jumped on the announcement that the special counsel isn’t recommending new indictments, comparing it to the Fyre Festival that notoriously didn’t live up to its hype.

“Libs, for the past two years: ‘Lemme tell y’all – the Mueller Report gonna be the biggest, dopest, flyest Report on planet earth. You best not miss this Report. Get ready – we gonna blow yo minds,’” joked Benny Johnson.

DEMOCRATS VOW TO KEEP INVESTIGATING TRUMP DESPITE MUELLER’S CONCLUSIONS, NO NEW INDICTMENTS

Other tweets poked fun at Mueller procrastinating.

“Robert Mueller sweating in front of his laptop, staring at a Word doc containing only the words ‘The Mueller Report’ and a blinking cursor,” wrote one user. "Mueller is currently up-sizing all the periods from 12 to 14 font," wrote Vann Newkirk, a journalist for the Atlantic.

“I’ve been in Robert Mueller’s position before and let me tell you, he has not written s—,” journalist Tim Murphy wrote, joking that Mueller was scrambling to write the report at the last minute.

Many followed the joke, offering their own suggestions on how the special counsel procrastinated amid the looming deadline.

“Mueller’s just gonna take a quick nap and then work on the report when he gets up,” wrote a Twitter user. “Mueller‘s gonna take himself out to lunch cause he can’t think in his own place and going outside will get the juices flowing,” another added.

“The Daily Show” compared Mueller’s report to Beyoncé’s “Lemonade” album, which was unexpectedly released in 2016. The comedy show mashed Mueller with the artist, coming up with “Kremlinade” and captioning the picture with “Oooh Mueller report just dropped!”

Others, meanwhile, speculated on the content of the report. “What if the Mueller Report is just a comparison/contrast essay about regional BBQ styles?” asked comedian Todd Barry.

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“Mueller got confused, he just wrote a 3 page book report on SUPERFUDGE. Upside, he really really really liked it,” another Twitter user joked.

Source: Fox News Politics

Attorney General William Barr is pushing to reveal the principal conclusions of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report as early as Saturday night, an administration official familiar with the process tells Fox News.

“The Attorney General wants to get this out tonight," the source said, noting that some procedural hurdles could delay Barr’s release.  “It will hit what is on everyone’s minds — no parsing of words, no games."

A separate source told Fox News that Barr is likely to report on Mueller’s primary conclusions between 3 p.m. and 5 p.m. ET.

Mueller is not recommending any further indictments as part of his inquiry, which effectively ended Friday, according to a senior Justice Department official. Barr notified key congressional leaders in a letter Friday evening that Mueller finished his investigation, adding that a summary of the probe’s findings may be provided to lawmakers as soon as this weekend.

It will likely take longer for the facts supporting the conclusions to come out, Fox News is told, because there may be materials that are either classified, or subject to executive privilege in the factual material.

Fox News is told that Barr may run the conclusions past White House Counsel Pat Cipollone and Emmett Flood, who are currently in Mar-a-Lago, before they are released — but that Trump’s personal attorneys are unlikely to be notified.

Attorney General William Barr leaves his home in McLean, Va., on Friday, March 22, 2019. Special Counsel Robert Mueller is expected to present a report to the Justice Department any day now outlining the findings of his nearly two-year investigation into Russian election meddling, possible collusion with Trump campaign officials and possible obstruction of justice by Trump.

Attorney General William Barr leaves his home in McLean, Va., on Friday, March 22, 2019. Special Counsel Robert Mueller is expected to present a report to the Justice Department any day now outlining the findings of his nearly two-year investigation into Russian election meddling, possible collusion with Trump campaign officials and possible obstruction of justice by Trump. (AP)

Fox News has also confirmed that House Democrats, meanwhile, will conduct a conference call at 3 p.m. E.T. Saturday with “chairs of relevant committees” to discuss next steps regarding the Mueller report and messaging. New York Rep. Hakeem Jeffries will host as Caucus Chair, and attendees will include Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, Oversight Committee Chairman Elijah E. Cummings, and Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam B. Schiff, as well as Committee on Financial Services Chairwoman Maxine Waters.

Some advocacy groups, however, have made clear they aren’t keen on waiting. A nonprofit organization on Friday night filed the first known Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit seeking the immediate and total public disclosure of Mueller’s completed report, echoing bipartisan calls for transparency following his nearly two-year probe into whether the Trump campaign illegally colluded with Russia.

The Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) wrote in an emergency complaint filed in a Washington, D.C., federal district court that the "public has a right to know the full scope of Russian interference in the 2016 United States presidential election and whether the president of the United States played any role in such interference."

The lawsuit continued: "The public also has a right to know whether the president unlawfully obstructed any investigation into Russian election interference or related matters. The requested records are vital to the public’s understanding of these issues and to the integrity of the political system of the United States.”

The delivery of the Mueller report, which a DOJ official called "comprehensive," does mean the investigation has concluded without any public charges of a criminal conspiracy between the campaign and Russia or of obstruction by the president.

That’s good news for a handful of Trump associates and family members dogged by speculation of possible wrongdoing. They include Donald Trump Jr., who had a role in arranging a Trump Tower meeting at the height of the 2016 election campaign with a Kremlin-linked lawyer, and Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, who was interviewed at least twice by Mueller’s prosecutors.

MAINSTREAM MEDIA, PUNDITS MELT DOWN ON NEWS MUELLER WON’T ISSUE ANY MORE INDICTMENTS

Still, some key details remain unanswered, EPIC said, prompting its litigation. EPIC first filed a FOIA request seeking access to Mueller-related documents in November 2018 and requested expedited processing, citing the "overwhelming" public interest in the case. But the Justice Department, on behalf of Mueller’s office, wrote back that EPIC could effectively take a hike because the DOJ could not “identify a particular urgency to inform the public about an actual or alleged federal government activity."

Special Counsel Robert Mueller arrives at his office building, Thursday, March 21, 2019, in Washington. Mueller has concluded his investigation into Russian election interference and possible coordination with associates of President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Special Counsel Robert Mueller arrives at his office building, Thursday, March 21, 2019, in Washington. Mueller has concluded his investigation into Russian election interference and possible coordination with associates of President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

"Today—March 22, 2019—is the 92nd working day since the DOJ received EPIC’s FOIA request," the complaint stated, charging that "the DOJ has failed to make a determination regarding EPIC’s FOIA request within the time period allowed" by federal law.

EPIC’s lawsuit demanded not only the full release of the Mueller report but also any supporting exhibits and documentation relied upon by Mueller’s team, including "all drafts, outlines, exhibits, and supporting materials associated with any actual or planned explanation for any investigative or prosecutorial step."

House Democrats, meanwhile, have somewhat downplayed the Mueller probe and suggested that the left-leaning lawmakers themselves might take on the job of trying to prove collusion, not ruling out the possibility of Mueller being asked or subpoenaed to testify before congressional committees.

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“If the Justice Department doesn’t release the whole report or tries to keep parts of it secret, we will certainly subpoena the parts of the report and we will reserve the right to call Mueller to testify before the committee or to subpoena him,” House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., said in a statement.

While the Mueller probe’s conclusions are not yet known, the investigation already has led to indictments, convictions or guilty pleas for nearly three dozen people and three companies. All told, Mueller charged 34 people, including the president’s former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort; his first national security adviser, Michael Flynn; and three Russian companies. Twenty-five Russians were indicted on charges related to election interference, accused either of hacking Democratic email accounts during the campaign or of orchestrating a social media campaign that spread disinformation on the internet.

President Donald Trump talks with reporters before boarding Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House, Friday, March 22, 2019, in Washington. Special counsel Robert Mueller on Friday turned over his long-awaited final report on the contentious Russia investigation, ending a probe that has cast a dark shadow over Donald Trump's presidency with no new charges but launching a fresh wave of political battles over the still-confidential findings. 

President Donald Trump talks with reporters before boarding Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House, Friday, March 22, 2019, in Washington. Special counsel Robert Mueller on Friday turned over his long-awaited final report on the contentious Russia investigation, ending a probe that has cast a dark shadow over Donald Trump’s presidency with no new charges but launching a fresh wave of political battles over the still-confidential findings.  (AP)

Five Trump aides pleaded guilty and agreed to cooperate with Mueller, and a sixth, longtime confidant Roger Stone, is awaiting trial on charges that he lied to Congress and engaged in witness tampering.

OPINION: WHY ALL AMERICANS SHOULD REJECT THE MUELLER REPORT

Despite all that prosecutorial activity, though, no Americans have been charged with improperly conspiring with Russia. In a series of posts on Twitter on Friday, journalist Glenn Greenwald – who also called for the release of the Mueller report — repeatedly emphasized that point, and condemned pundits for hyping the Mueller report irresponsibly for nearly two years.

"It’s truly fascinating to watch Dems grapple with the fact that Mueller finished his work without indicting a single American for conspiring with Russia over the election: everything from "nobody has read his report!" (irrelevant to that fact) to ‘sealed indictments!’ (unhinged)." Greenwald wrote.

In another post, he criticized media outlets for promoting the anti-Trump rhetoric of partisan commentators like ex-CIA Director John Brennan — an Obama appointee whose security clearance was revoked last year because, the Trump administration said, he was using it to lend credence to political attacks.

"You can’t blame MSNBC viewers for being confused," Greenwald continued. "They largely kept dissenters from their Trump/Russia spy tale off the air for 2 years. As recently as 2 weeks ago, they had @JohnBrennan strongly suggesting Mueller would indict Trump family members on collusion as his last act. … Oh gosh – turns out that if you hire ex-CIA Directors to be ‘news analysts,’ they’ll abuse our airwaves to disseminate self-serving disinformation."

A copy of a letter from Attorney General William Barr advising Congress that Special Counsel Robert Mueller has concluded his investigation, is shown Friday, March 22, 2019 in Washington. Robert Mueller on Friday turned over his long-awaited final report on the contentious Russia investigation that has cast a dark shadow over Donald Trump's presidency, entangled Trump's family and resulted in criminal charges against some of the president's closest associates. 

A copy of a letter from Attorney General William Barr advising Congress that Special Counsel Robert Mueller has concluded his investigation, is shown Friday, March 22, 2019 in Washington. Robert Mueller on Friday turned over his long-awaited final report on the contentious Russia investigation that has cast a dark shadow over Donald Trump’s presidency, entangled Trump’s family and resulted in criminal charges against some of the president’s closest associates.  (AP)

He concluded: "How – if you’re an MSNBC viewer (or consumer of similar online content) – can you not be angry & disoriented having been fed utter [bulls–t] like this for 2 straight years with basically no dissent allowed? Just listen to what they were telling you to believe & how false it was."

JEROME CORSI CELEBRATES END OF RUSSIA PROBE, SAYS HE’S VINDICATED IN DECISION TO RESIST MUELLER BULLYING

Meanwhile, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer declared it "imperative" to make the full report public, a call echoed by several Democrats vying to challenge Trump in 2020.

"The American people have a right to the truth," Schumer and Pelosi said in a joint statement.

Democrats also expressed concern that Trump would try to get a "sneak preview" of the findings.

"The White House must not be allowed to interfere in decisions about what parts of those findings or evidence are made public," they said in a joint statement.

A presidential helicopter takes off in a practice run as the White House is reflected in a puddle, Friday March 22, 2019, in Washington, amid news that special counsel Robert Mueller has concluded his investigation into Russian election interference and possible coordination with associates of President Donald Trump. 

A presidential helicopter takes off in a practice run as the White House is reflected in a puddle, Friday March 22, 2019, in Washington, amid news that special counsel Robert Mueller has concluded his investigation into Russian election interference and possible coordination with associates of President Donald Trump.  (AP)

It was not clear whether Trump would have early access to Mueller’s findings. Spokeswoman Sarah Sanders suggested the White House would not interfere, saying, "We look forward to the process taking its course." But Trump’s personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, told The Associated Press Friday that the legal team would seek to get "an early look" before they were made public.

Giuliani said it was "appropriate" for the White House to be able "to review matters of executive privilege." He said had received no assurances from the Department of Justice on that front. He later softened his stance, saying the decision was "up to DOJ and we are confident it will be handled properly."

The White House did receive a brief heads-up on the report’s arrival Friday. Barr’s chief of staff called White House Counsel Emmet Flood Friday about 20 minutes before sending the letter went to the Republican and Democratic leaders of the Senate and House Judiciary committees.

Fox News’ Ed Henry, Mike Emanuel, Brooke Singman, Jake Gibson, and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Attorney General William Barr will not send a letter on Saturday to Capitol Hill concerning the conclusions of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report, a senior Justice Department official told Fox News, although administration sources familiar with the process say Barr is pushing for a prompt release of its key findings this weekend.

A source familiar with the process had told Fox News earlier Saturday that Barr’s report on Mueller’s findings was imminent.

“The Attorney General wants to get this out tonight," the source said Saturday, noting that some procedural hurdles could delay Barr’s release. “It will hit what is on everyone’s minds — no parsing of words, no games."

A separate source had also told Fox News that Barr was likely to report on Mueller’s primary conclusions Saturday afternoon. Fox News is told that Barr may run the conclusions past White House Counsel Pat Cipollone and Emmett Flood, who are currently in Mar-a-Lago, before they are released — but that Trump’s personal attorneys are unlikely to be notified.

It will likely take longer for the facts supporting the conclusions to come out, Fox News is told, because there may be materials that are either classified, or subject to executive privilege in the factual material.

Mueller is not recommending any further indictments as part of his inquiry, which effectively ended Friday, according to a senior Justice Department official. Barr notified key congressional leaders in a letter Friday evening that Mueller finished his investigation, adding that a summary of the probe’s findings may be provided to lawmakers as soon as this weekend.

Attorney General William Barr leaves his home in McLean, Va., on Friday, March 22, 2019. Special Counsel Robert Mueller is expected to present a report to the Justice Department any day now outlining the findings of his nearly two-year investigation into Russian election meddling, possible collusion with Trump campaign officials and possible obstruction of justice by Trump.

Attorney General William Barr leaves his home in McLean, Va., on Friday, March 22, 2019. Special Counsel Robert Mueller is expected to present a report to the Justice Department any day now outlining the findings of his nearly two-year investigation into Russian election meddling, possible collusion with Trump campaign officials and possible obstruction of justice by Trump. (AP)

Fox News has also confirmed that House Democrats, meanwhile, will conduct a conference call at 3 p.m.E.T. Saturday with “chairs of relevant committees” to discuss next steps regarding the Mueller report and messaging. New York Rep. Hakeem Jeffries will host as Caucus Chair, and attendees will include Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, Oversight Committee Chairman Elijah E. Cummings, and Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam B. Schiff, as well as Committee on Financial Services Chairwoman Maxine Waters.

Delaware Democrat Sen. Chris Coons, a member of the Judiciary Committee, told Fox News on Saturday: "It’s the end of the beginning. But it’s not the beginning of the end."

He added: "We’re spending the weekend in anticipation of what Attorney General Barr may share with Congress," and cautioned that Democrats were "concerned executive privilege could be asserted broadly here" to hide the report’s key findings.

Special Counsel Robert Mueller runs errands in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C. on Saturday, after filing his final report on Russian interference in the U.S. election. (Fox News)

Special Counsel Robert Mueller runs errands in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C. on Saturday, after filing his final report on Russian interference in the U.S. election. (Fox News)

Some advocacy groups have made clear they aren’t keen on waiting. A nonprofit organization on Friday night filed the first known Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit seeking the immediate and total public disclosure of Mueller’s completed report and all related documents, echoing bipartisan calls for transparency following his nearly two-year probe into whether the Trump campaign illegally colluded with Russia.

WATCH THE MEDIA MELTDOWN: RACHEL MADDOW BECOMES VISIBLY EMOTIONAL AFTER MUELLER REPORT DROPPED, WITH NO NEW INDICTMENTS

The Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) wrote in an emergency complaint filed in a Washington, D.C., federal district court that the "public has a right to know the full scope of Russian interference in the 2016 United States presidential election and whether the president of the United States played any role in such interference."

The delivery of the Mueller report, which a DOJ official called "comprehensive," does mean the investigation has concluded without any public charges of a criminal conspiracy between the campaign and Russia or of obstruction by the president.

That’s good news for a handful of Trump associates and family members dogged by speculation of possible wrongdoing. They include Donald Trump Jr., who had a role in arranging a Trump Tower meeting at the height of the 2016 election campaign with a Kremlin-linked lawyer, and Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, who was interviewed at least twice by Mueller’s prosecutors.  Still, some key details remain unanswered, EPIC said, prompting its litigation.

House Democrats, meanwhile, have somewhat downplayed the Mueller probe and suggested that the left-leaning lawmakers themselves might take on the job of trying to prove collusion, not ruling out the possibility of Mueller being asked or subpoenaed to testify before congressional committees.

Special Counsel Robert Mueller arrives at his office building, Thursday, March 21, 2019, in Washington. Mueller has concluded his investigation into Russian election interference and possible coordination with associates of President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Special Counsel Robert Mueller arrives at his office building, Thursday, March 21, 2019, in Washington. Mueller has concluded his investigation into Russian election interference and possible coordination with associates of President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

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“If the Justice Department doesn’t release the whole report or tries to keep parts of it secret, we will certainly subpoena the parts of the report and we will reserve the right to call Mueller to testify before the committee or to subpoena him,” House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., said in a statement.

While the Mueller probe’s conclusions are not yet known, the investigation already has led to indictments, convictions or guilty pleas for nearly three dozen people and three companies. All told, Mueller charged 34 people, including the president’s former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort; his first national security adviser, Michael Flynn; and three Russian companies.

Twenty-five Russians were indicted on charges related to election interference, accused either of hacking Democratic email accounts during the campaign or of orchestrating a social media campaign that spread disinformation on the internet.

President Donald Trump talks with reporters before boarding Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House, Friday, March 22, 2019, in Washington. Special counsel Robert Mueller on Friday turned over his long-awaited final report on the contentious Russia investigation, ending a probe that has cast a dark shadow over Donald Trump's presidency with no new charges but launching a fresh wave of political battles over the still-confidential findings. 

President Donald Trump talks with reporters before boarding Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House, Friday, March 22, 2019, in Washington. Special counsel Robert Mueller on Friday turned over his long-awaited final report on the contentious Russia investigation, ending a probe that has cast a dark shadow over Donald Trump’s presidency with no new charges but launching a fresh wave of political battles over the still-confidential findings.  (AP)

Five Trump aides pleaded guilty and agreed to cooperate with Mueller, and a sixth, longtime confidant Roger Stone, is awaiting trial on charges that he lied to Congress and engaged in witness tampering.

OPINION: WHY ALL AMERICANS SHOULD REJECT THE MUELLER REPORT

Despite all that prosecutorial activity, though, no Americans have been charged with improperly conspiring with Russia. In a series of posts on Twitter on Friday, journalist Glenn Greenwald – who also called for the release of the Mueller report — repeatedly emphasized that point, and condemned pundits for hyping the Mueller report irresponsibly for nearly two years.

"It’s truly fascinating to watch Dems grapple with the fact that Mueller finished his work without indicting a single American for conspiring with Russia over the election: everything from "nobody has read his report!" (irrelevant to that fact) to ‘sealed indictments!’ (unhinged)." Greenwald wrote.

In another post, he criticized media outlets for promoting the anti-Trump rhetoric of partisan commentators like ex-CIA Director John Brennan — an Obama appointee whose security clearance was revoked last year because, the Trump administration said, he was using it to lend credence to political attacks.

"You can’t blame MSNBC viewers for being confused," Greenwald continued. "They largely kept dissenters from their Trump/Russia spy tale off the air for 2 years. As recently as 2 weeks ago, they had @JohnBrennan strongly suggesting Mueller would indict Trump family members on collusion as his last act. … Oh gosh – turns out that if you hire ex-CIA Directors to be ‘news analysts,’ they’ll abuse our airwaves to disseminate self-serving disinformation."

A copy of a letter from Attorney General William Barr advising Congress that Special Counsel Robert Mueller has concluded his investigation, is shown Friday, March 22, 2019 in Washington. Robert Mueller on Friday turned over his long-awaited final report on the contentious Russia investigation that has cast a dark shadow over Donald Trump's presidency, entangled Trump's family and resulted in criminal charges against some of the president's closest associates. 

A copy of a letter from Attorney General William Barr advising Congress that Special Counsel Robert Mueller has concluded his investigation, is shown Friday, March 22, 2019 in Washington. Robert Mueller on Friday turned over his long-awaited final report on the contentious Russia investigation that has cast a dark shadow over Donald Trump’s presidency, entangled Trump’s family and resulted in criminal charges against some of the president’s closest associates.  (AP)

He concluded: "How – if you’re an MSNBC viewer (or consumer of similar online content) – can you not be angry & disoriented having been fed utter [bulls–t] like this for 2 straight years with basically no dissent allowed? Just listen to what they were telling you to believe & how false it was."

JEROME CORSI CELEBRATES END OF RUSSIA PROBE, SAYS HE’S VINDICATED IN DECISION TO RESIST MUELLER BULLYING

Meanwhile, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer declared it "imperative" to make the full report public, a call echoed by several Democrats vying to challenge Trump in 2020.

"The American people have a right to the truth," Schumer and Pelosi said in a joint statement.

Democrats also expressed concern that Trump would try to get a "sneak preview" of the findings.

"The White House must not be allowed to interfere in decisions about what parts of those findings or evidence are made public," they said in a joint statement.

A presidential helicopter takes off in a practice run as the White House is reflected in a puddle, Friday March 22, 2019, in Washington, amid news that special counsel Robert Mueller has concluded his investigation into Russian election interference and possible coordination with associates of President Donald Trump. 

A presidential helicopter takes off in a practice run as the White House is reflected in a puddle, Friday March 22, 2019, in Washington, amid news that special counsel Robert Mueller has concluded his investigation into Russian election interference and possible coordination with associates of President Donald Trump.  (AP)

It was not clear whether Trump would have early access to Mueller’s findings. Spokeswoman Sarah Sanders suggested the White House would not interfere, saying, "We look forward to the process taking its course." But Trump’s personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, told The Associated Press Friday that the legal team would seek to get "an early look" before they were made public.

Giuliani said it was "appropriate" for the White House to be able "to review matters of executive privilege." He said had received no assurances from the Department of Justice on that front. He later softened his stance, saying the decision was "up to DOJ and we are confident it will be handled properly."

The White House did receive a brief heads-up on the report’s arrival Friday. Barr’s chief of staff called White House Counsel Emmet Flood Friday about 20 minutes before sending the letter went to the Republican and Democratic leaders of the Senate and House Judiciary committees.

Fox News’ Ed Henry, Mike Emanuel, Brooke Singman, Chad Pergram, Jake Gibson, and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Attorney General William Barr will not send a letter on Saturday to Capitol Hill concerning the conclusions of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report, a senior Justice Department official told Fox News, although administration sources familiar with the process say Barr is pushing for a prompt release of its key findings this weekend.

A source familiar with the process had told Fox News earlier Saturday that Barr’s report on Mueller’s findings was imminent.

“The Attorney General wants to get this out tonight," the source said Saturday, noting that some procedural hurdles could delay Barr’s release. “It will hit what is on everyone’s minds — no parsing of words, no games."

A separate source had also told Fox News that Barr was likely to report on Mueller’s primary conclusions Saturday afternoon. Fox News is told that Barr may run the conclusions past White House Counsel Pat Cipollone and Emmett Flood, who are currently in Mar-a-Lago, before they are released — but that Trump’s personal attorneys are unlikely to be notified.

It will likely take longer for the facts supporting the conclusions to come out, Fox News is told, because there may be materials that are either classified, or subject to executive privilege in the factual material.

Mueller is not recommending any further indictments as part of his inquiry, which effectively ended Friday, according to a senior Justice Department official. Barr notified key congressional leaders in a letter Friday evening that Mueller finished his investigation, adding that a summary of the probe’s findings may be provided to lawmakers as soon as this weekend.

Attorney General William Barr leaves his home in McLean, Va., on Friday, March 22, 2019. Special Counsel Robert Mueller is expected to present a report to the Justice Department any day now outlining the findings of his nearly two-year investigation into Russian election meddling, possible collusion with Trump campaign officials and possible obstruction of justice by Trump.

Attorney General William Barr leaves his home in McLean, Va., on Friday, March 22, 2019. Special Counsel Robert Mueller is expected to present a report to the Justice Department any day now outlining the findings of his nearly two-year investigation into Russian election meddling, possible collusion with Trump campaign officials and possible obstruction of justice by Trump. (AP)

Fox News has also confirmed that House Democrats, meanwhile, will conduct a conference call at 3 p.m.E.T. Saturday with “chairs of relevant committees” to discuss next steps regarding the Mueller report and messaging. New York Rep. Hakeem Jeffries will host as Caucus Chair, and attendees will include Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, Oversight Committee Chairman Elijah E. Cummings, and Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam B. Schiff, as well as Committee on Financial Services Chairwoman Maxine Waters.

Delaware Democrat Sen. Chris Coons, a member of the Judiciary Committee, told Fox News on Saturday: "It’s the end of the beginning. But it’s not the beginning of the end."

He added: "We’re spending the weekend in anticipation of what Attorney General Barr may share with Congress," and cautioned that Democrats were "concerned executive privilege could be asserted broadly here" to hide the report’s key findings.

Special Counsel Robert Mueller runs errands in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C. on Saturday, after filing his final report on Russian interference in the U.S. election. (Fox News)

Special Counsel Robert Mueller runs errands in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C. on Saturday, after filing his final report on Russian interference in the U.S. election. (Fox News)

Some advocacy groups have made clear they aren’t keen on waiting. A nonprofit organization on Friday night filed the first known Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit seeking the immediate and total public disclosure of Mueller’s completed report and all related documents, echoing bipartisan calls for transparency following his nearly two-year probe into whether the Trump campaign illegally colluded with Russia.

WATCH THE MEDIA MELTDOWN: RACHEL MADDOW BECOMES VISIBLY EMOTIONAL AFTER MUELLER REPORT DROPPED, WITH NO NEW INDICTMENTS

The Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) wrote in an emergency complaint filed in a Washington, D.C., federal district court that the "public has a right to know the full scope of Russian interference in the 2016 United States presidential election and whether the president of the United States played any role in such interference."

The delivery of the Mueller report, which a DOJ official called "comprehensive," does mean the investigation has concluded without any public charges of a criminal conspiracy between the campaign and Russia or of obstruction by the president.

That’s good news for a handful of Trump associates and family members dogged by speculation of possible wrongdoing. They include Donald Trump Jr., who had a role in arranging a Trump Tower meeting at the height of the 2016 election campaign with a Kremlin-linked lawyer, and Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, who was interviewed at least twice by Mueller’s prosecutors.  Still, some key details remain unanswered, EPIC said, prompting its litigation.

House Democrats, meanwhile, have somewhat downplayed the Mueller probe and suggested that the left-leaning lawmakers themselves might take on the job of trying to prove collusion, not ruling out the possibility of Mueller being asked or subpoenaed to testify before congressional committees.

Special Counsel Robert Mueller arrives at his office building, Thursday, March 21, 2019, in Washington. Mueller has concluded his investigation into Russian election interference and possible coordination with associates of President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Special Counsel Robert Mueller arrives at his office building, Thursday, March 21, 2019, in Washington. Mueller has concluded his investigation into Russian election interference and possible coordination with associates of President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

CLICK TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“If the Justice Department doesn’t release the whole report or tries to keep parts of it secret, we will certainly subpoena the parts of the report and we will reserve the right to call Mueller to testify before the committee or to subpoena him,” House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., said in a statement.

While the Mueller probe’s conclusions are not yet known, the investigation already has led to indictments, convictions or guilty pleas for nearly three dozen people and three companies. All told, Mueller charged 34 people, including the president’s former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort; his first national security adviser, Michael Flynn; and three Russian companies.

Twenty-five Russians were indicted on charges related to election interference, accused either of hacking Democratic email accounts during the campaign or of orchestrating a social media campaign that spread disinformation on the internet.

President Donald Trump talks with reporters before boarding Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House, Friday, March 22, 2019, in Washington. Special counsel Robert Mueller on Friday turned over his long-awaited final report on the contentious Russia investigation, ending a probe that has cast a dark shadow over Donald Trump's presidency with no new charges but launching a fresh wave of political battles over the still-confidential findings. 

President Donald Trump talks with reporters before boarding Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House, Friday, March 22, 2019, in Washington. Special counsel Robert Mueller on Friday turned over his long-awaited final report on the contentious Russia investigation, ending a probe that has cast a dark shadow over Donald Trump’s presidency with no new charges but launching a fresh wave of political battles over the still-confidential findings.  (AP)

Five Trump aides pleaded guilty and agreed to cooperate with Mueller, and a sixth, longtime confidant Roger Stone, is awaiting trial on charges that he lied to Congress and engaged in witness tampering.

OPINION: WHY ALL AMERICANS SHOULD REJECT THE MUELLER REPORT

Despite all that prosecutorial activity, though, no Americans have been charged with improperly conspiring with Russia. In a series of posts on Twitter on Friday, journalist Glenn Greenwald – who also called for the release of the Mueller report — repeatedly emphasized that point, and condemned pundits for hyping the Mueller report irresponsibly for nearly two years.

"It’s truly fascinating to watch Dems grapple with the fact that Mueller finished his work without indicting a single American for conspiring with Russia over the election: everything from "nobody has read his report!" (irrelevant to that fact) to ‘sealed indictments!’ (unhinged)." Greenwald wrote.

In another post, he criticized media outlets for promoting the anti-Trump rhetoric of partisan commentators like ex-CIA Director John Brennan — an Obama appointee whose security clearance was revoked last year because, the Trump administration said, he was using it to lend credence to political attacks.

"You can’t blame MSNBC viewers for being confused," Greenwald continued. "They largely kept dissenters from their Trump/Russia spy tale off the air for 2 years. As recently as 2 weeks ago, they had @JohnBrennan strongly suggesting Mueller would indict Trump family members on collusion as his last act. … Oh gosh – turns out that if you hire ex-CIA Directors to be ‘news analysts,’ they’ll abuse our airwaves to disseminate self-serving disinformation."

A copy of a letter from Attorney General William Barr advising Congress that Special Counsel Robert Mueller has concluded his investigation, is shown Friday, March 22, 2019 in Washington. Robert Mueller on Friday turned over his long-awaited final report on the contentious Russia investigation that has cast a dark shadow over Donald Trump's presidency, entangled Trump's family and resulted in criminal charges against some of the president's closest associates. 

A copy of a letter from Attorney General William Barr advising Congress that Special Counsel Robert Mueller has concluded his investigation, is shown Friday, March 22, 2019 in Washington. Robert Mueller on Friday turned over his long-awaited final report on the contentious Russia investigation that has cast a dark shadow over Donald Trump’s presidency, entangled Trump’s family and resulted in criminal charges against some of the president’s closest associates.  (AP)

He concluded: "How – if you’re an MSNBC viewer (or consumer of similar online content) – can you not be angry & disoriented having been fed utter [bulls–t] like this for 2 straight years with basically no dissent allowed? Just listen to what they were telling you to believe & how false it was."

JEROME CORSI CELEBRATES END OF RUSSIA PROBE, SAYS HE’S VINDICATED IN DECISION TO RESIST MUELLER BULLYING

Meanwhile, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer declared it "imperative" to make the full report public, a call echoed by several Democrats vying to challenge Trump in 2020.

"The American people have a right to the truth," Schumer and Pelosi said in a joint statement.

Democrats also expressed concern that Trump would try to get a "sneak preview" of the findings.

"The White House must not be allowed to interfere in decisions about what parts of those findings or evidence are made public," they said in a joint statement.

A presidential helicopter takes off in a practice run as the White House is reflected in a puddle, Friday March 22, 2019, in Washington, amid news that special counsel Robert Mueller has concluded his investigation into Russian election interference and possible coordination with associates of President Donald Trump. 

A presidential helicopter takes off in a practice run as the White House is reflected in a puddle, Friday March 22, 2019, in Washington, amid news that special counsel Robert Mueller has concluded his investigation into Russian election interference and possible coordination with associates of President Donald Trump.  (AP)

It was not clear whether Trump would have early access to Mueller’s findings. Spokeswoman Sarah Sanders suggested the White House would not interfere, saying, "We look forward to the process taking its course." But Trump’s personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, told The Associated Press Friday that the legal team would seek to get "an early look" before they were made public.

Giuliani said it was "appropriate" for the White House to be able "to review matters of executive privilege." He said had received no assurances from the Department of Justice on that front. He later softened his stance, saying the decision was "up to DOJ and we are confident it will be handled properly."

The White House did receive a brief heads-up on the report’s arrival Friday. Barr’s chief of staff called White House Counsel Emmet Flood Friday about 20 minutes before sending the letter went to the Republican and Democratic leaders of the Senate and House Judiciary committees.

Fox News’ Ed Henry, Mike Emanuel, Brooke Singman, Chad Pergram, Jake Gibson, and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Justice Department sources tell Fox News that Attorney General William Barr is working to quickly release the primary conclusions of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s recently concluded Russia investigation. That information, however, wasn’t expected to emerge on Saturday.

For Washington insiders, the waiting game isn’t easy. Speculation about the hotly anticipated report’s contents has been rampant.

Still, in a show of confidence, President Trump waved and flashed two thumbs up to supporters as he returned to his Florida Mar-a-Lago estate on Saturday.

The president’s demeanor signaled the administration’s strong belief that Mueller’s long-awaited final report contained good news. Among other things, the special counsel is not recommending any further indictments as part of his inquiry, which effectively ended Friday, according to a senior Justice Department official.

Further, Mueller did not charge any Americans with illegally conspiring with Russians on any matter, including election interference – a foundational reason for the launch of the high-profile Mueller probe nearly two years ago.

Even as Trump remained in Florida, Barr was working "hand in hand" on Saturday with Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein in reviewing the Mueller report at the DOJ, the senior official said.

Multiple sources familiar with the process had told Fox News earlier Saturday that Barr’s report on Mueller’s findings was imminent. But hours later, a senior Justice Department official told Fox News that Barr would not send a letter to Captiol Hill until Sunday at the earliest.

“The attorney general wants to get this out tonight," the source said Saturday, noting that some procedural hurdles could delay Barr’s release. “It will hit what is on everyone’s minds — no parsing of words, no games."

A separate source had also told Fox News that Barr was likely to report on Mueller’s primary conclusions Saturday afternoon. Fox News is told that Barr may run the conclusions past White House Counsel Pat Cipollone and Emmett Flood, who were in Mar-a-Lago, before they are released — but that Trump’s personal attorneys are unlikely to be notified.

Attorney General William Barr leaves his home in McLean, Va., on Friday. Special Counsel Robert Mueller is expected to present a report to the Justice Department any day now outlining the findings of his nearly two-year investigation into Russian election meddling, possible collusion with Trump campaign officials and possible obstruction of justice by Trump.

Attorney General William Barr leaves his home in McLean, Va., on Friday. Special Counsel Robert Mueller is expected to present a report to the Justice Department any day now outlining the findings of his nearly two-year investigation into Russian election meddling, possible collusion with Trump campaign officials and possible obstruction of justice by Trump. (AP)

It will likely take longer for the facts supporting the conclusions to come out, Fox News is told, because there may be materials that are either classified, or subject to executive privilege in the factual material.

WATCH THE MEDIA MELTDOWN: RACHEL MADDOW BECOMES VISIBLY EMOTIONAL AFTER MUELLER REPORT DROPPED, WITH NO NEW INDICTMENTS

Barr notified key congressional leaders in a letter Friday evening that Mueller finished his investigation, adding that a summary of the probe’s findings may be provided to lawmakers as soon as this weekend.

Fox News has also confirmed that House Democrats, meanwhile, began a conference call at approximately 3:10 p.m.E.T. Saturday with “chairs of relevant committees” discussing next steps regarding the Mueller report and messaging. New York Rep. Hakeem Jeffries will host as Caucus Chair, and attendees will include Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, Oversight Committee Chairman Elijah E. Cummings, and Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam B. Schiff, as well as Committee on Financial Services Chairwoman Maxine Waters.

At the meeting, sources tell Fox News, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi pushed for a public release of the Mueller report, and said she would reject any classified briefing of the report’s findings to lawmakers. Any briefing must be unclassified so that members of Congress can talk about it publicly, Pelosi said.

Special Counsel Robert Mueller runs errands in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C. on Saturday, after filing his final report on Russian interference in the U.S. election. (Fox News)

Special Counsel Robert Mueller runs errands in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C. on Saturday, after filing his final report on Russian interference in the U.S. election. (Fox News)

Delaware Democrat Sen. Chris Coons, a member of the Judiciary Committee, told Fox News on Saturday: "It’s the end of the beginning. But it’s not the beginning of the end."

He added: "We’re spending the weekend in anticipation of what Attorney General Barr may share with Congress," and cautioned that Democrats were "concerned executive privilege could be asserted broadly here" to hide the report’s key findings.

CHAFFETZ: HYPOCRITICAL DEMS SUDDENLY CARE ABOUT TRANSPARENCY

Supporters of President Donald Trump are seen from the media van in the motorcade accompanying the president in West Palm Beach, Fla., Saturday, March 23, 2019, en route to Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Supporters of President Donald Trump are seen from the media van in the motorcade accompanying the president in West Palm Beach, Fla., Saturday, March 23, 2019, en route to Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Some advocacy groups have made clear they aren’t keen on waiting. A nonprofit organization on Friday night filed the first known Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit seeking the immediate and total public disclosure of Mueller’s completed report and all related documents, echoing bipartisan calls for transparency following his nearly two-year probe into whether the Trump campaign illegally colluded with Russia.

The Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) wrote in an emergency complaint filed in a Washington, D.C., federal district court that the "public has a right to know the full scope of Russian interference in the 2016 United States presidential election and whether the president of the United States played any role in such interference."

The delivery of the Mueller report, which a DOJ official called "comprehensive," does mean the investigation has concluded without any public charges of a criminal conspiracy between the campaign and Russia or of obstruction by the president.

That’s good news for a handful of Trump associates and family members dogged by speculation of possible wrongdoing. They include Donald Trump Jr., who had a role in arranging a Trump Tower meeting at the height of the 2016 election campaign with a Kremlin-linked lawyer, and Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, who was interviewed at least twice by Mueller’s prosecutors.  Still, some key details remain unanswered, EPIC said, prompting its litigation.

House Democrats, meanwhile, have somewhat downplayed the Mueller probe and suggested that the left-leaning lawmakers themselves might take on the job of trying to prove collusion, not ruling out the possibility of Mueller being asked or subpoenaed to testify before congressional committees.

Special Counsel Robert Mueller arrives at his office building, Thursday, March 21, 2019, in Washington. Mueller has concluded his investigation into Russian election interference and possible coordination with associates of President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Special Counsel Robert Mueller arrives at his office building, Thursday, March 21, 2019, in Washington. Mueller has concluded his investigation into Russian election interference and possible coordination with associates of President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

CLICK TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“If the Justice Department doesn’t release the whole report or tries to keep parts of it secret, we will certainly subpoena the parts of the report and we will reserve the right to call Mueller to testify before the committee or to subpoena him,” House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., said in a statement.

While the Mueller probe’s conclusions are not yet known, the investigation already has led to indictments, convictions or guilty pleas for nearly three dozen people and three companies. All told, Mueller charged 34 people, including the president’s former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort; his first national security adviser, Michael Flynn; and three Russian companies.

Twenty-five Russians were indicted on charges related to election interference, accused either of hacking Democratic email accounts during the campaign or of orchestrating a social media campaign that spread disinformation on the internet.

President Donald Trump talks with reporters before boarding Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House, Friday, March 22, 2019, in Washington. Special counsel Robert Mueller on Friday turned over his long-awaited final report on the contentious Russia investigation, ending a probe that has cast a dark shadow over Donald Trump's presidency with no new charges but launching a fresh wave of political battles over the still-confidential findings. 

President Donald Trump talks with reporters before boarding Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House, Friday, March 22, 2019, in Washington. Special counsel Robert Mueller on Friday turned over his long-awaited final report on the contentious Russia investigation, ending a probe that has cast a dark shadow over Donald Trump’s presidency with no new charges but launching a fresh wave of political battles over the still-confidential findings.  (AP)

Five Trump aides pleaded guilty and agreed to cooperate with Mueller, and a sixth, longtime confidant Roger Stone, is awaiting trial on charges that he lied to Congress and engaged in witness tampering.

OPINION: WHY ALL AMERICANS SHOULD REJECT THE MUELLER REPORT

Despite all that prosecutorial activity, though, Americans were not implicated in criminally colluding with Russia to influence the election. In a series of posts on Twitter on Friday, journalist Glenn Greenwald – who also called for the release of the Mueller report — repeatedly emphasized that point, and condemned pundits for hyping the Mueller report irresponsibly for nearly two years.

"It’s truly fascinating to watch Dems grapple with the fact that Mueller finished his work without indicting a single American for conspiring with Russia over the election: everything from "nobody has read his report!" (irrelevant to that fact) to ‘sealed indictments!’ (unhinged)." Greenwald wrote.

In another post, he criticized media outlets for promoting the anti-Trump rhetoric of partisan commentators like ex-CIA Director John Brennan — an Obama appointee whose security clearance was revoked last year because, the Trump administration said, he was using it to lend credence to political attacks.

"You can’t blame MSNBC viewers for being confused," Greenwald continued. "They largely kept dissenters from their Trump/Russia spy tale off the air for 2 years. As recently as 2 weeks ago, they had @JohnBrennan strongly suggesting Mueller would indict Trump family members on collusion as his last act. … Oh gosh – turns out that if you hire ex-CIA Directors to be ‘news analysts,’ they’ll abuse our airwaves to disseminate self-serving disinformation."

A copy of a letter from Attorney General William Barr advising Congress that Special Counsel Robert Mueller has concluded his investigation, is shown Friday, March 22, 2019 in Washington. Robert Mueller on Friday turned over his long-awaited final report on the contentious Russia investigation that has cast a dark shadow over Donald Trump's presidency, entangled Trump's family and resulted in criminal charges against some of the president's closest associates. 

A copy of a letter from Attorney General William Barr advising Congress that Special Counsel Robert Mueller has concluded his investigation, is shown Friday, March 22, 2019 in Washington. Robert Mueller on Friday turned over his long-awaited final report on the contentious Russia investigation that has cast a dark shadow over Donald Trump’s presidency, entangled Trump’s family and resulted in criminal charges against some of the president’s closest associates.  (AP)

He concluded: "How – if you’re an MSNBC viewer (or consumer of similar online content) – can you not be angry & disoriented having been fed utter [bulls–t] like this for 2 straight years with basically no dissent allowed? Just listen to what they were telling you to believe & how false it was."

JEROME CORSI CELEBRATES END OF RUSSIA PROBE, SAYS HE’S VINDICATED IN DECISION TO RESIST MUELLER BULLYING

Meanwhile, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer declared it "imperative" to make the full report public, a call echoed by several Democrats vying to challenge Trump in 2020.

"The American people have a right to the truth," Schumer and Pelosi said in a joint statement.

Democrats also expressed concern that Trump would try to get a "sneak preview" of the findings.

"The White House must not be allowed to interfere in decisions about what parts of those findings or evidence are made public," they said in a joint statement.

A presidential helicopter takes off in a practice run as the White House is reflected in a puddle, Friday March 22, 2019, in Washington, amid news that special counsel Robert Mueller has concluded his investigation into Russian election interference and possible coordination with associates of President Donald Trump. 

A presidential helicopter takes off in a practice run as the White House is reflected in a puddle, Friday March 22, 2019, in Washington, amid news that special counsel Robert Mueller has concluded his investigation into Russian election interference and possible coordination with associates of President Donald Trump.  (AP)

It was not clear whether Trump would have early access to Mueller’s findings. Spokeswoman Sarah Sanders suggested the White House would not interfere, saying, "We look forward to the process taking its course." But Trump’s personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, told The Associated Press Friday that the legal team would seek to get "an early look" before they were made public.

Giuliani said it was "appropriate" for the White House to be able "to review matters of executive privilege." He said had received no assurances from the Department of Justice on that front. He later softened his stance, saying the decision was "up to DOJ and we are confident it will be handled properly."

The White House did receive a brief heads-up on the report’s arrival Friday. Barr’s chief of staff called White House Counsel Emmet Flood Friday about 20 minutes before sending the letter went to the Republican and Democratic leaders of the Senate and House Judiciary committees.

Fox News’ Ed Henry, Mike Emanuel, Brooke Singman, Chad Pergram, Jake Gibson, and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Justice Department sources tell Fox News that Attorney General William Barr is working to quickly release the primary conclusions of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s recently concluded Russia investigation. That information, however, wasn’t expected to emerge on Saturday.

For Washington insiders, the waiting game isn’t easy. Speculation about the hotly anticipated report’s contents has been rampant.

Still, in a show of confidence, President Trump waved and flashed two thumbs up to supporters as he returned to his Florida Mar-a-Lago estate on Saturday.

The president’s demeanor signaled the administration’s strong belief that Mueller’s long-awaited final report contained good news. Among other things, the special counsel is not recommending any further indictments as part of his inquiry, which effectively ended Friday, according to a senior Justice Department official.

Further, Mueller did not charge any Americans with illegally conspiring with Russians on any matter, including election interference – a foundational reason for the launch of the high-profile Mueller probe nearly two years ago.

Even as Trump remained in Florida, Barr was working "hand in hand" on Saturday with Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein in reviewing the Mueller report at the DOJ, the senior official said.

Multiple sources familiar with the process had told Fox News earlier Saturday that Barr’s report on Mueller’s findings was imminent. But hours later, a senior Justice Department official told Fox News that Barr would not send a letter to Captiol Hill until Sunday at the earliest.

“The attorney general wants to get this out tonight," the source said Saturday, noting that some procedural hurdles could delay Barr’s release. “It will hit what is on everyone’s minds — no parsing of words, no games."

A separate source had also told Fox News that Barr was likely to report on Mueller’s primary conclusions Saturday afternoon. Fox News is told that Barr may run the conclusions past White House Counsel Pat Cipollone and Emmett Flood, who were in Mar-a-Lago, before they are released — but that Trump’s personal attorneys are unlikely to be notified.

Attorney General William Barr leaves his home in McLean, Va., on Friday. Special Counsel Robert Mueller is expected to present a report to the Justice Department any day now outlining the findings of his nearly two-year investigation into Russian election meddling, possible collusion with Trump campaign officials and possible obstruction of justice by Trump.

Attorney General William Barr leaves his home in McLean, Va., on Friday. Special Counsel Robert Mueller is expected to present a report to the Justice Department any day now outlining the findings of his nearly two-year investigation into Russian election meddling, possible collusion with Trump campaign officials and possible obstruction of justice by Trump. (AP)

It will likely take longer for the facts supporting the conclusions to come out, Fox News is told, because there may be materials that are either classified, or subject to executive privilege in the factual material.

WATCH THE MEDIA MELTDOWN: RACHEL MADDOW BECOMES VISIBLY EMOTIONAL AFTER MUELLER REPORT DROPPED, WITH NO NEW INDICTMENTS

Barr notified key congressional leaders in a letter Friday evening that Mueller finished his investigation, adding that a summary of the probe’s findings may be provided to lawmakers as soon as this weekend.

Fox News has also confirmed that House Democrats, meanwhile, began a conference call at approximately 3:10 p.m.E.T. Saturday with “chairs of relevant committees” discussing next steps regarding the Mueller report and messaging. New York Rep. Hakeem Jeffries will host as Caucus Chair, and attendees will include Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, Oversight Committee Chairman Elijah E. Cummings, and Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam B. Schiff, as well as Committee on Financial Services Chairwoman Maxine Waters.

At the meeting, sources tell Fox News, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi pushed for a public release of the Mueller report, and said she would reject any classified briefing of the report’s findings to lawmakers. Any briefing must be unclassified so that members of Congress can talk about it publicly, Pelosi said.

Special Counsel Robert Mueller runs errands in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C. on Saturday, after filing his final report on Russian interference in the U.S. election. (Fox News)

Special Counsel Robert Mueller runs errands in the Georgetown neighborhood of Washington, D.C. on Saturday, after filing his final report on Russian interference in the U.S. election. (Fox News)

Delaware Democrat Sen. Chris Coons, a member of the Judiciary Committee, told Fox News on Saturday: "It’s the end of the beginning. But it’s not the beginning of the end."

He added: "We’re spending the weekend in anticipation of what Attorney General Barr may share with Congress," and cautioned that Democrats were "concerned executive privilege could be asserted broadly here" to hide the report’s key findings.

CHAFFETZ: HYPOCRITICAL DEMS SUDDENLY CARE ABOUT TRANSPARENCY

Supporters of President Donald Trump are seen from the media van in the motorcade accompanying the president in West Palm Beach, Fla., Saturday, March 23, 2019, en route to Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Supporters of President Donald Trump are seen from the media van in the motorcade accompanying the president in West Palm Beach, Fla., Saturday, March 23, 2019, en route to Mar-a-Lago in Palm Beach, Fla. (AP Photo/Carolyn Kaster)

Some advocacy groups have made clear they aren’t keen on waiting. A nonprofit organization on Friday night filed the first known Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit seeking the immediate and total public disclosure of Mueller’s completed report and all related documents, echoing bipartisan calls for transparency following his nearly two-year probe into whether the Trump campaign illegally colluded with Russia.

The Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) wrote in an emergency complaint filed in a Washington, D.C., federal district court that the "public has a right to know the full scope of Russian interference in the 2016 United States presidential election and whether the president of the United States played any role in such interference."

The delivery of the Mueller report, which a DOJ official called "comprehensive," does mean the investigation has concluded without any public charges of a criminal conspiracy between the campaign and Russia or of obstruction by the president.

That’s good news for a handful of Trump associates and family members dogged by speculation of possible wrongdoing. They include Donald Trump Jr., who had a role in arranging a Trump Tower meeting at the height of the 2016 election campaign with a Kremlin-linked lawyer, and Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, who was interviewed at least twice by Mueller’s prosecutors.  Still, some key details remain unanswered, EPIC said, prompting its litigation.

House Democrats, meanwhile, have somewhat downplayed the Mueller probe and suggested that the left-leaning lawmakers themselves might take on the job of trying to prove collusion, not ruling out the possibility of Mueller being asked or subpoenaed to testify before congressional committees.

Special Counsel Robert Mueller arrives at his office building, Thursday, March 21, 2019, in Washington. Mueller has concluded his investigation into Russian election interference and possible coordination with associates of President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Special Counsel Robert Mueller arrives at his office building, Thursday, March 21, 2019, in Washington. Mueller has concluded his investigation into Russian election interference and possible coordination with associates of President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

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“If the Justice Department doesn’t release the whole report or tries to keep parts of it secret, we will certainly subpoena the parts of the report and we will reserve the right to call Mueller to testify before the committee or to subpoena him,” House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., said in a statement.

While the Mueller probe’s conclusions are not yet known, the investigation already has led to indictments, convictions or guilty pleas for nearly three dozen people and three companies. All told, Mueller charged 34 people, including the president’s former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort; his first national security adviser, Michael Flynn; and three Russian companies.

Twenty-five Russians were indicted on charges related to election interference, accused either of hacking Democratic email accounts during the campaign or of orchestrating a social media campaign that spread disinformation on the internet.

President Donald Trump talks with reporters before boarding Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House, Friday, March 22, 2019, in Washington. Special counsel Robert Mueller on Friday turned over his long-awaited final report on the contentious Russia investigation, ending a probe that has cast a dark shadow over Donald Trump's presidency with no new charges but launching a fresh wave of political battles over the still-confidential findings. 

President Donald Trump talks with reporters before boarding Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House, Friday, March 22, 2019, in Washington. Special counsel Robert Mueller on Friday turned over his long-awaited final report on the contentious Russia investigation, ending a probe that has cast a dark shadow over Donald Trump’s presidency with no new charges but launching a fresh wave of political battles over the still-confidential findings.  (AP)

Five Trump aides pleaded guilty and agreed to cooperate with Mueller, and a sixth, longtime confidant Roger Stone, is awaiting trial on charges that he lied to Congress and engaged in witness tampering.

OPINION: WHY ALL AMERICANS SHOULD REJECT THE MUELLER REPORT

Despite all that prosecutorial activity, though, Americans were not implicated in criminally colluding with Russia to influence the election. In a series of posts on Twitter on Friday, journalist Glenn Greenwald – who also called for the release of the Mueller report — repeatedly emphasized that point, and condemned pundits for hyping the Mueller report irresponsibly for nearly two years.

"It’s truly fascinating to watch Dems grapple with the fact that Mueller finished his work without indicting a single American for conspiring with Russia over the election: everything from "nobody has read his report!" (irrelevant to that fact) to ‘sealed indictments!’ (unhinged)." Greenwald wrote.

In another post, he criticized media outlets for promoting the anti-Trump rhetoric of partisan commentators like ex-CIA Director John Brennan — an Obama appointee whose security clearance was revoked last year because, the Trump administration said, he was using it to lend credence to political attacks.

"You can’t blame MSNBC viewers for being confused," Greenwald continued. "They largely kept dissenters from their Trump/Russia spy tale off the air for 2 years. As recently as 2 weeks ago, they had @JohnBrennan strongly suggesting Mueller would indict Trump family members on collusion as his last act. … Oh gosh – turns out that if you hire ex-CIA Directors to be ‘news analysts,’ they’ll abuse our airwaves to disseminate self-serving disinformation."

A copy of a letter from Attorney General William Barr advising Congress that Special Counsel Robert Mueller has concluded his investigation, is shown Friday, March 22, 2019 in Washington. Robert Mueller on Friday turned over his long-awaited final report on the contentious Russia investigation that has cast a dark shadow over Donald Trump's presidency, entangled Trump's family and resulted in criminal charges against some of the president's closest associates. 

A copy of a letter from Attorney General William Barr advising Congress that Special Counsel Robert Mueller has concluded his investigation, is shown Friday, March 22, 2019 in Washington. Robert Mueller on Friday turned over his long-awaited final report on the contentious Russia investigation that has cast a dark shadow over Donald Trump’s presidency, entangled Trump’s family and resulted in criminal charges against some of the president’s closest associates.  (AP)

He concluded: "How – if you’re an MSNBC viewer (or consumer of similar online content) – can you not be angry & disoriented having been fed utter [bulls–t] like this for 2 straight years with basically no dissent allowed? Just listen to what they were telling you to believe & how false it was."

JEROME CORSI CELEBRATES END OF RUSSIA PROBE, SAYS HE’S VINDICATED IN DECISION TO RESIST MUELLER BULLYING

Meanwhile, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer declared it "imperative" to make the full report public, a call echoed by several Democrats vying to challenge Trump in 2020.

"The American people have a right to the truth," Schumer and Pelosi said in a joint statement.

Democrats also expressed concern that Trump would try to get a "sneak preview" of the findings.

"The White House must not be allowed to interfere in decisions about what parts of those findings or evidence are made public," they said in a joint statement.

A presidential helicopter takes off in a practice run as the White House is reflected in a puddle, Friday March 22, 2019, in Washington, amid news that special counsel Robert Mueller has concluded his investigation into Russian election interference and possible coordination with associates of President Donald Trump. 

A presidential helicopter takes off in a practice run as the White House is reflected in a puddle, Friday March 22, 2019, in Washington, amid news that special counsel Robert Mueller has concluded his investigation into Russian election interference and possible coordination with associates of President Donald Trump.  (AP)

It was not clear whether Trump would have early access to Mueller’s findings. Spokeswoman Sarah Sanders suggested the White House would not interfere, saying, "We look forward to the process taking its course." But Trump’s personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, told The Associated Press Friday that the legal team would seek to get "an early look" before they were made public.

Giuliani said it was "appropriate" for the White House to be able "to review matters of executive privilege." He said had received no assurances from the Department of Justice on that front. He later softened his stance, saying the decision was "up to DOJ and we are confident it will be handled properly."

The White House did receive a brief heads-up on the report’s arrival Friday. Barr’s chief of staff called White House Counsel Emmet Flood Friday about 20 minutes before sending the letter went to the Republican and Democratic leaders of the Senate and House Judiciary committees.

Fox News’ Ed Henry, Mike Emanuel, Brooke Singman, Chad Pergram, Jake Gibson, and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

A nonprofit organization has filed the first known Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit seeking the immediate and total public disclosure of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s completed report, echoing bipartisan calls for transparency following his nearly two-year probe into whether the Trump campaign illegally colluded with Russia.

The lawsuit, filed Friday night, comes as Fox News confirms that House Democrats will conduct a conference call at 3 p.m. E.T. Saturday with “chairs of relevant committees” to discuss next steps regarding the Mueller report and messaging. New York Rep. Hakeem Jeffries will host as Caucus Chair.

Mueller is not recommending any further indictments as part of his inquiry, which effectively ended Friday, according to a senior Justice Department official. Attorney General William Barr notified key congressional leaders in a letter Friday evening that Mueller finished his investigation, adding that a summary of the probe’s findings may be provided to lawmakers as soon as this weekend.

The Electronic Privacy Information Center (EPIC) wrote in an emergency complaint filed in a Washington, D.C., federal district court that the "public has a right to know the full scope of Russian interference in the 2016 United States presidential election and whether the president of the United States played any role in such interference."

The lawsuit continued: "The public also has a right to know whether the president unlawfully obstructed any investigation into Russian election interference or related matters. The requested records are vital to the public’s understanding of these issues and to the integrity of the political system of the United States.”

The delivery of the Mueller report, which a DOJ official called "comprehensive," does mean the investigation has concluded without any public charges of a criminal conspiracy between the campaign and Russia or of obstruction by the president.

Attorney General William Barr leaves his home in McLean, Va., on Friday, March 22, 2019. Special Counsel Robert Mueller is expected to present a report to the Justice Department any day now outlining the findings of his nearly two-year investigation into Russian election meddling, possible collusion with Trump campaign officials and possible obstruction of justice by Trump.

Attorney General William Barr leaves his home in McLean, Va., on Friday, March 22, 2019. Special Counsel Robert Mueller is expected to present a report to the Justice Department any day now outlining the findings of his nearly two-year investigation into Russian election meddling, possible collusion with Trump campaign officials and possible obstruction of justice by Trump. (AP)

That’s good news for a handful of Trump associates and family members dogged by speculation of possible wrongdoing. They include Donald Trump Jr., who had a role in arranging a Trump Tower meeting at the height of the 2016 election campaign with a Kremlin-linked lawyer, and Trump’s son-in-law, Jared Kushner, who was interviewed at least twice by Mueller’s prosecutors.

MAINSTREAM MEDIA, PUNDITS MELT DOWN ON NEWS MUELLER WON’T ISSUE ANY MORE INDICTMENTS

Still, some key details remain unanswered, EPIC said, prompting its litigation. EPIC first filed a FOIA request seeking access to Mueller-related documents in November 2018 and requested expedited processing, citing the "overwhelming" public interest in the case. But the Justice Department, on behalf of Mueller’s office, wrote back that EPIC could effectively take a hike because the DOJ could not “identify a particular urgency to inform the public about an actual or alleged federal government activity."

"Today—March 22, 2019—is the 92nd working day since the DOJ received EPIC’s FOIA request," the complaint stated, charging that "the DOJ has failed to make a determination regarding EPIC’s FOIA request within the time period allowed" by federal law.

EPIC’s lawsuit demanded not only the full release of the Mueller report but also any supporting exhibits and documentation relied upon by Mueller’s team, including "all drafts, outlines, exhibits, and supporting materials associated with any actual or planned explanation for any investigative or prosecutorial step."

House Democrats, meanwhile, have somewhat downplayed the Mueller probe and suggested that the left-leaning lawmakers themselves might take on the job of trying to prove collusion, not ruling out the possibility of Mueller being asked or subpoenaed to testify before congressional committees.

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“If the Justice Department doesn’t release the whole report or tries to keep parts of it secret, we will certainly subpoena the parts of the report and we will reserve the right to call Mueller to testify before the committee or to subpoena him,” House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., said in a statement.

Special Counsel Robert Mueller arrives at his office building, Thursday, March 21, 2019, in Washington. Mueller has concluded his investigation into Russian election interference and possible coordination with associates of President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Special Counsel Robert Mueller arrives at his office building, Thursday, March 21, 2019, in Washington. Mueller has concluded his investigation into Russian election interference and possible coordination with associates of President Donald Trump. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

While the Mueller probe’s conclusions are not yet known, the investigation already has led to indictments, convictions or guilty pleas for nearly three dozen people and three companies. All told, Mueller charged 34 people, including the president’s former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort; his first national security adviser, Michael Flynn; and three Russian companies. Twenty-five Russians were indicted on charges related to election interference, accused either of hacking Democratic email accounts during the campaign or of orchestrating a social media campaign that spread disinformation on the internet.

Five Trump aides pleaded guilty and agreed to cooperate with Mueller, and a sixth, longtime confidant Roger Stone, is awaiting trial on charges that he lied to Congress and engaged in witness tampering.

OPINION: WHY ALL AMERICANS SHOULD REJECT THE MUELLER REPORT

Despite all that prosecutorial activity, though, no Americans have been charged with improperly conspiring with Russia. In a series of posts on Twitter on Friday, journalist Glenn Greenwald – who also called for the release of the Mueller report — repeatedly emphasized that point, and condemned pundits for hyping the Mueller report irresponsibly for nearly two years.

President Donald Trump talks with reporters before boarding Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House, Friday, March 22, 2019, in Washington. Special counsel Robert Mueller on Friday turned over his long-awaited final report on the contentious Russia investigation, ending a probe that has cast a dark shadow over Donald Trump's presidency with no new charges but launching a fresh wave of political battles over the still-confidential findings. 

President Donald Trump talks with reporters before boarding Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House, Friday, March 22, 2019, in Washington. Special counsel Robert Mueller on Friday turned over his long-awaited final report on the contentious Russia investigation, ending a probe that has cast a dark shadow over Donald Trump’s presidency with no new charges but launching a fresh wave of political battles over the still-confidential findings.  (AP)

"It’s truly fascinating to watch Dems grapple with the fact that Mueller finished his work without indicting a single American for conspiring with Russia over the election: everything from "nobody has read his report!" (irrelevant to that fact) to ‘sealed indictments!’ (unhinged)." Greenwald wrote.

In another post, he criticized media outlets for promoting the anti-Trump rhetoric of partisan commentators like ex-CIA Director John Brennan — an Obama appointee whose security clearance was revoked last year because, the Trump administration said, he was using it to lend credence to political attacks.

"You can’t blame MSNBC viewers for being confused," Greenwald continued. "They largely kept dissenters from their Trump/Russia spy tale off the air for 2 years. As recently as 2 weeks ago, they had @JohnBrennan strongly suggesting Mueller would indict Trump family members on collusion as his last act. … Oh gosh – turns out that if you hire ex-CIA Directors to be ‘news analysts,’ they’ll abuse our airwaves to disseminate self-serving disinformation."

A copy of a letter from Attorney General William Barr advising Congress that Special Counsel Robert Mueller has concluded his investigation, is shown Friday, March 22, 2019 in Washington. Robert Mueller on Friday turned over his long-awaited final report on the contentious Russia investigation that has cast a dark shadow over Donald Trump's presidency, entangled Trump's family and resulted in criminal charges against some of the president's closest associates. 

A copy of a letter from Attorney General William Barr advising Congress that Special Counsel Robert Mueller has concluded his investigation, is shown Friday, March 22, 2019 in Washington. Robert Mueller on Friday turned over his long-awaited final report on the contentious Russia investigation that has cast a dark shadow over Donald Trump’s presidency, entangled Trump’s family and resulted in criminal charges against some of the president’s closest associates.  (AP)

He concluded: "How – if you’re an MSNBC viewer (or consumer of similar online content) – can you not be angry & disoriented having been fed utter [bulls–t] like this for 2 straight years with basically no dissent allowed? Just listen to what they were telling you to believe & how false it was."

JEROME CORSI CELEBRATES END OF RUSSIA PROBE, SAYS HE’S VINDICATED IN DECISION TO RESIST MUELLER BULLYING

Meanwhile, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer declared it "imperative" to make the full report public, a call echoed by several Democrats vying to challenge Trump in 2020.

"The American people have a right to the truth," Schumer and Pelosi said in a joint statement.

Democrats also expressed concern that Trump would try to get a "sneak preview" of the findings.

"The White House must not be allowed to interfere in decisions about what parts of those findings or evidence are made public," they said in a joint statement.

A presidential helicopter takes off in a practice run as the White House is reflected in a puddle, Friday March 22, 2019, in Washington, amid news that special counsel Robert Mueller has concluded his investigation into Russian election interference and possible coordination with associates of President Donald Trump. 

A presidential helicopter takes off in a practice run as the White House is reflected in a puddle, Friday March 22, 2019, in Washington, amid news that special counsel Robert Mueller has concluded his investigation into Russian election interference and possible coordination with associates of President Donald Trump.  (AP)

It was not clear whether Trump would have early access to Mueller’s findings. Spokeswoman Sarah Sanders suggested the White House would not interfere, saying, "We look forward to the process taking its course." But Trump’s personal attorney, Rudy Giuliani, told The Associated Press Friday that the legal team would seek to get "an early look" before they were made public.

Giuliani said it was "appropriate" for the White House to be able "to review matters of executive privilege." He said had received no assurances from the Department of Justice on that front. He later softened his stance, saying the decision was "up to DOJ and we are confident it will be handled properly."

The White House did receive a brief heads-up on the report’s arrival Friday. Barr’s chief of staff called White House Counsel Emmet Flood Friday about 20 minutes before sending the letter went to the Republican and Democratic leaders of the Senate and House Judiciary committees.

Fox News’ Mike Emanuel, Brooke Singman, Jake Gibson, and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

We hear from the dead all the time in Congress.

Those who have passed are part of the daily lingo on Capitol Hill.

The senator’s office is over in Hart. Republicans are meeting in the Mansfield Room. Cannon Rotunda? I thought you said the live shot was in the Russell Rotunda. Are you going to the hearing in Longworth?

Here’s a key to decode the references:

The Hart Senate Office Building is named for the late Sen. Phil Hart (D-MI). The Mansfield Room is a formal space in the Capitol, named after the late Senate Majority Leader Mike Mansfield (D-MT). The Cannon Rotunda is in the Cannon House Office Building, named after the late House Speaker Joe Cannon (R-IL). The Russell Rotunda is in the Russell Senate Office Building, the namesake of Sen. Richard Russell (D-GA). TV news crews often do live hits and interviews from both rotundas. And the Longworth House Office Building is named after the late Speaker Nicholas Longworth (R-OH).

JOHN MCCAIN’S YOUNGEST DAUGHTER SLAMS TRUMP IN RARE PUBLIC STATEMENT

Statues of late Congressional figures, American presidents and other persons of historical importance saturate the Capitol complex. President Ronald Reagan and Martin Luther King Jr. in the Capitol Rotunda. Rosa Parks and Thomas Edison in Statuary Hall. Sakakawea and Helen Keller in the Capitol Visitor’s Center.

I recently unearthed two dusty CD’s of public radio stories I did about Congress between 2004 and 2006. What struck me about these aural time capsules was how many lawmakers spoke from the grave in the reports:

Sens. Ted Stevens (R-AK), George Voinovich (R-OH), Daniel Akaka (D-HI), Craig Thomas (R-WY), Ted Kennedy (D-MA) and Pete Domenici (R-NM), along with Reps. John Dingell (D-MI), Steven LaTourette (R-OH), Vern Ehlers (R-MI), Leonard Boswell (D-IA) and Julia Carson (D-IN).

We talk about the departed all the time.

Senators invoke the “Byrd Rule” when discussing the complex, budget reconciliation process, named after the late Senate Majority Leader Robert Byrd (D-WV). The “Byrd Rule” bars provisions attached a budget reconciliation measure which would add significantly to the deficit. Joe Cannon has come up a lot of late. Cannon faced a rebellion from lawmakers after he ran the House with an iron fist. The creation of the “motion to recommit” or “MTR” grew out of that uprising. An MTR is the last chance for the minority party to kill or alter legislation on the floor. Some Democrats want to change the MTR as Republicans have recently prevailed on two MTR’s on the floor, against the wishes of most Democrats.

DIRECTOR JUDD APATOW SLAMS DONALD TRUMP’S ‘CULT-LIKE’ FOLLOWERS OVER JOHN MCCAIN JABS

We bring this all up because President Trump is again railing about the late Sen. John McCain (R-AZ).

McCain has seemingly crept under the President’s skin. And so Mr. Trump is unloading broadsides against the late senator and 2008 GOP presidential nominee. President Trump has said he “never liked McCain,” rekindling an old feud with the Arizona Republican. The President lashed out at McCain for not supporting a Republican effort to repeal and replace Obamacare. As a result, a host of lawmakers from both sides are now rallying to the defense of McCain, who laid in state in the Capitol Rotunda late last summer.

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-NY) wants to rename the Russell Senate Office Building after McCain.

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-SC) is one of President Trump’s biggest backers and perhaps McCain’s most loyal colleague. But Graham says he doesn’t “like it” when the President attacks his late friend.

TRUMP SAYS JOHN MCCAIN ‘WAS HORRIBLE, WHAT HE DID WITH REPEAL AND REPLACE’

In an interview with Georgia Public Broadcasting, Sen. Johnny Isakson (R-GA) called Mr. Trump’s onslaught about McCain “deplorable” and “damaging.”

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) called McCain “a rare patriot and genuine American hero” via Twitter. Yet some criticized McConnell for only defending McCain and not denouncing Mr. Trump’s disparagements.

The President’s aggressive condemnations of McCain even compelled the McCain Institute for International Leadership, associated with Arizona State University, to publish a news release titled “The Facts About John McCain.” The missive talked about McCain’s military service, time as a prisoner of war and included a lengthy justification about the senator’s position on health care.

“John McCain opposed Obamacare and fully supported ‘repeal and replace,’” punched back the release. “John McCain voted against the bill presented to the U.S. Senate – his famous ‘thumbs down’ – because it was ‘repeal,’ without ‘replace.’”

In an interview with Maria Bartiromo on Fox Business, President Trump reiterated that he is “not a fan” of McCain, even suggesting that the furor over McCain is the press’s fault.

“You people bring it up,” said the President.

Yet it was President Trump who again began tearing into McCain after a period of dormancy.

“What he did to the Republican party and to the nation, the sick people who could have had great health care… Not good,” said Mr. Trump.

It’s not strange to hear about deceased lawmakers in Washington. So many of them are etched into the day-to-day patter of Capitol Hill that most who utter their names probably don’t even know much about the name of a room or a building they’re talking about. Rayburn. Dirksen. LBJ. And it may not be long until something in the Senate is named after John McCain. It’s as though these figures are kind of still living, influencing events.

There’s a thing in Star Wars about the dead. On multiple occasions, those who have passed on sometimes return as a “Force ghost.” They speak to the living and stage-manage events from the grave.

After Darth Vader cut down Obi-Wan Kenobi in a lightsaber duel, the latter returned via metempsychosis as a Force Ghost. Kenobi periodically re-emerges, instructing Luke Skywalker from the great beyond.

Death in Congress is a little bit like what happens in Star Wars.

People still talk about “Sarbanes-Oxley,” a major piece of consumer and financial regulation legislation. It’s named after former Sen. Paul Sarbanes (D-MD) and the late Rep. Mike Oxley (R-OH) who crafted the measure. Every college student in the country knows about “Pell Grants,” named after the late Sen. Claiborne Pell (D-RI). Americans have long held tax-free “Roth IRA’s,” engineered by the late Sen. William Roth (R-DE). The “Hyde Amendment” is a provision sponsored by the late Rep. Henry Hyde (R-IL) prohibiting the use of federal dollars for abortions. There is even “McCain-Feingold.” McCain teamed up with former Sen. Russ Feingold (D-WI) to regulate campaign financing.

Legislation and Congressional infrastructure are usually where we continue to hear from former leaders, impacting the daily lives of Americans, long after they died. President Trump’s fixation with McCain is different. Mr. Trump routinely changes the ground rules in politics.

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No one can recall if other Presidents lobbed opprobrium toward late Senate Majority Leader Everett Dirksen (R-IL) or late House Speaker Sam Rayburn (D-TX). But it’s likely historians will remember the invective President Trump lobbed at McCain.

Source: Fox News Politics

Conservative author Jerome Corsi declared he’s “vindicated” after the Special Counsel Robert Mueller ended the Russia investigation and recommends no new indictments.

Corsi has been in the crosshairs of the Mueller probe since last year when he was accused of lying under oath to Mueller’s investigators, but was never indicted.

‘THERE NEEDS TO BE A RECKONING’ FOR THOSE WHO SPREAD RUSSIA COLLUSION NARRATIVE: MOLLIE HEMINGWAY

Speaking on Friday following the news that Mueller submitted his report to the Justice Department, he said that he and his family are pleased that the investigation ended with him not getting charged in the end.

“We feel vindicated,” Corsi told CNN. “I did nothing wrong.”

“We feel vindicated. I did nothing wrong.”

— Jerome Corsi

Corsi, the former Washington bureau chief of the conspiracy theory outlet InfoWars, was offered a deal with investigators that would have required him to plead guilty to perjury.

But he refused the deal on the basis that he could not lie about something he knew to be false, even if it meant living out his life in prison.

CORSI SUES MUELLER OVER ALLEGED GRAND JURY LEAKS, SEEKS $350M IN DAMAGES: REPORT

“I went in there to cooperate with them. They treated me as a criminal,” Corsi told the outlet. “I consider this entire investigation to be fraudulent. I’m glad it’s over.”

Corsi sued the special counsel last year, accusing Mueller of leaking grand jury items and various constitutional violations, including illegal surveillance.

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According to the lawsuit, Mueller tried to get Corsi to give testimony that he said is false. He’s seeking $100 million in actual damages and $250 million in damages due to injury to his reputation.

Corsi told CNN that he won’t volunteer in the trial of his former close associated Roger Stone and will only appear if he’s subpoenaed.

Source: Fox News Politics

Bernie Sanders was hit a complaint this week, claiming his presidential campaign violated federal election laws by employing non-Americans in advisery positions.

A new complaint by the Coolidge Reagan Foundation filed with the Federal Election Commission (FEC) notes that three members of the Sanders campaign are foreign nationals, which appears to be a violation of federal election laws that prohibit foreign interference.

NEW SPOKESWOMAN FOR BERNIE SANDERS WON’T BE ABLE TO VOTE FOR HIM IN 2020 — SHE’S AN ILLEGAL IMMIGRANT

Maria Belén Sisa, Sanders’ deputy national press secretary who joined the campaign last month, was among the staffers named in the complaint, as first reported by the Washington Free Beacon. Sisa claims to be an illegal immigrant whose residency is protected under Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), an Obama-era program for assisting illegal immigrants who came to the U.S. as children.

Sisa recently caused an uproar after invoking an anti-Semitic “dual allegiance” trope of Jewish Americans while defending Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., and questioning whether American Jews, including Sanders, were loyal to the United States.

The complaint notes that Sisa not only got a salary from Sanders’ 2016 presidential campaign, she also contributed money to it and is now serving in “an advisory position” in the 2020 campaign – all of which are “direct and serious violations” of federal election laws.

“Senator Sanders and Bernie 2020 is permitting a foreign national, Ms. Sisa, to serve in an advisory position which allows her to directly or indirectly participate in the decision-making process of persons with regard to election-related activities in violation of FEC regulations,” the complaint reads.

“Senator Sanders and Bernie 2020 is permitting a foreign national, Ms. Sisa, to serve in an advisory position which allows her to directly or indirectly participate in the decision-making process of persons with regard to election-related activities in violation of FEC regulations."

— The complaint

BERNIE SANDERS AIDE DEFENDS OMAR WITH TERM SEEN AS ANTI-SEMITIC, APOLOGIZES

According to the FEC rules, foreign nationals, who aren’t lawfully admitted permanent residents, cannot directly or indirectly participate in political campaigns. Such individuals are also barred from making political contributions.

The complaint also names two other foreign nationals on the Sanders’ 2016 campaign, immigration activists Erika Andiola and Cesar Vargas, who worked as the campaign’s national Latino outreach strategist and press secretary for Latino outreach, respectively.

“Due to the high profile of Cesar Vargas, Erika Andiola, and Maria Belén Sisa as leading activists in the undocumented community, there is reason to believe that respondents are ‘foreign nationals’ within the meaning of 52 U.S.C. § 301219b)(2), and in violation of 11 C.F.R. § 110.20 (i) and A.O. 2004-26, directly or indirectly participated in the decision-making process of persons with regard to the election-related activities of Bernie 2016," the complaint continued.

“There is reason to believe, having previously employed Ms. Sisa, that Bernie 2020 is currently, and knowingly, permitting a ‘foreign national’ … to directly or indirectly participate in the decision-making process of persons with regard to the election-related activities of Bernie 2020.”

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The complaint calls on the FEC to investigate both the 2016 and the current presidential campaigns and take action to curb the violations.

“The Commission should determine and impose appropriate sanctions for any and all violations,” the complaint read. “Further, the Commission should enjoin respondents from any future violations and impose any necessary and appropriate remedies to ensure respondents’ future compliance with the Federal Election Campaign Act.”

Source: Fox News Politics

Bernie Sanders was hit a complaint this week, claiming his presidential campaign violated federal election laws by employing non-Americans in advisery positions.

A new complaint by the Coolidge Reagan Foundation filed with the Federal Election Commission (FEC) notes that three members of the Sanders campaign are foreign nationals, which appears to be a violation of federal election laws that prohibit foreign interference.

NEW SPOKESWOMAN FOR BERNIE SANDERS WON’T BE ABLE TO VOTE FOR HIM IN 2020 — SHE’S AN ILLEGAL IMMIGRANT

Maria Belén Sisa, Sanders’ deputy national press secretary who joined the campaign last month, was among the staffers named in the complaint, as first reported by the Washington Free Beacon. Sisa claims to be an illegal immigrant whose residency is protected under Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), an Obama-era program for assisting illegal immigrants who came to the U.S. as children.

Sisa recently caused an uproar after invoking an anti-Semitic “dual allegiance” trope of Jewish Americans while defending Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., and questioning whether American Jews, including Sanders, were loyal to the United States.

The complaint notes that Sisa not only got a salary from Sanders’ 2016 presidential campaign, she also contributed money to it and is now serving in “an advisory position” in the 2020 campaign – all of which are “direct and serious violations” of federal election laws.

“Senator Sanders and Bernie 2020 is permitting a foreign national, Ms. Sisa, to serve in an advisory position which allows her to directly or indirectly participate in the decision-making process of persons with regard to election-related activities in violation of FEC regulations,” the complaint reads.

“Senator Sanders and Bernie 2020 is permitting a foreign national, Ms. Sisa, to serve in an advisory position which allows her to directly or indirectly participate in the decision-making process of persons with regard to election-related activities in violation of FEC regulations."

— The complaint

BERNIE SANDERS AIDE DEFENDS OMAR WITH TERM SEEN AS ANTI-SEMITIC, APOLOGIZES

According to the FEC rules, foreign nationals, who aren’t lawfully admitted permanent residents, cannot directly or indirectly participate in political campaigns. Such individuals are also barred from making political contributions.

The complaint also names two other foreign nationals on the Sanders’ 2016 campaign, immigration activists Erika Andiola and Cesar Vargas, who worked as the campaign’s national Latino outreach strategist and press secretary for Latino outreach, respectively.

“Due to the high profile of Cesar Vargas, Erika Andiola, and Maria Belén Sisa as leading activists in the undocumented community, there is reason to believe that respondents are ‘foreign nationals’ within the meaning of 52 U.S.C. § 301219b)(2), and in violation of 11 C.F.R. § 110.20 (i) and A.O. 2004-26, directly or indirectly participated in the decision-making process of persons with regard to the election-related activities of Bernie 2016," the complaint continued.

“There is reason to believe, having previously employed Ms. Sisa, that Bernie 2020 is currently, and knowingly, permitting a ‘foreign national’ … to directly or indirectly participate in the decision-making process of persons with regard to the election-related activities of Bernie 2020.”

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The complaint calls on the FEC to investigate both the 2016 and the current presidential campaigns and take action to curb the violations.

“The Commission should determine and impose appropriate sanctions for any and all violations,” the complaint read. “Further, the Commission should enjoin respondents from any future violations and impose any necessary and appropriate remedies to ensure respondents’ future compliance with the Federal Election Campaign Act.”

Source: Fox News Politics

Congressional Democrats vowed Friday to keep investigating President Trump, his family, and associates despite Special Counsel Robert Mueller wrapping up his Russia investigation with no new indictments.

Attorney General William Barr notified key congressional leaders in a letter Friday evening that Mueller finished his investigation, adding that a summary of the probe’s findings may be provided to lawmakers as soon as this weekend.

Both the investigation’s end and the lack of any new indictments struck at the core of the Democrats’ messaging for the last two years that led people to believe the Mueller probe would uncover evident collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

ADAM SCHIFF REJECTS REPORTS THAT MUELLER INDICTMENTS ARE OVER, SAYS SPECIAL COUNSEL COULD BE CALLED TO TESTIFY

This prompted House Democrats to somewhat downplay the Mueller probe and suggested that the left-leaning lawmakers themselves might take on the job of trying to prove collusion, not ruling out the possibility of Mueller being asked or subpoenaed to testify before congressional committees.

“If the Justice Department doesn’t release the whole report or tries to keep parts of it secret, we will certainly subpoena the parts of the report and we will reserve the right to call Mueller to testify before the committee or to subpoena him,” House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., said in a statement.

Nadler is leading an investigation into “alleged obstruction of justice, public corruption, and other abuses of power by President Trump,” a probe he announced earlier this month and has requested documents and records from 81 individuals and entities connected, in some way, to the president.

So far only a fraction of those targeted have responded or complied with the document requests by the Nadler-imposed deadline of March 18.

Democrats in the House will also ask multiple executive branch agencies to preserve the information they gave to the special counsel, the Washington Post reported.

POLITICAL REACTION POURS IN AFTER MUELLER REPORT DROP

The Democratic chairs of the six House committees investigating the Trump administration and their Senate Democratic counterparts reportedly have penned a letter that will be sent to the Department of Justice, FBI and White House Counsel’s Office, and other agencies in an effort to preserve records in the event of the committees requesting for them.

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif.,made similar comments to Nadler and rejected reports that no more Mueller indictments are coming.

“If necessary, we will call Bob Mueller or others before our committee, I would imagine the judiciary committee may call the attorney general if necessary,” Schiff told CNN.

This is not the first time Schiff dismissed the importance of the Mueller report. Earlier this month, he insisted that the question of whether Trump was “compromised by a foreign power” would end only when Schiff’s panel’s investigation ends.

“Our predominant concern on my committee is: Was this president, is this president, compromised by a foreign power?,” Schiff said during an interview on MSNBC’s “Morning Joe.”

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“Well, if there’s insufficient evidence in the Mueller report and we’re not able to produce sufficient evidence in our own investigation," Schiff said, "that ends the inquiry."

Source: Fox News Politics

Those who spent the last two years pushing the narrative that the Trump campaign colluded with Russia during the 2016 presidential election need to be held accountable, the Federalist senior editor Mollie Hemingway argued Friday.

Earlier in the day, the office of Special Counsel Robert Mueller handed in its report on the Russia investigation to the Department of Justice and it was announced that no new indictments would be forthcoming.

During Friday’s All-Star panel segment on Fox News’ "Special Report with Bret Baier," Hemingway — along with Washington Free Beacon editor-in-chief Matthew Continetti and Reuters White House correspondent Jeff Mason — weighed in on the breaking news that reverberated throughout Washington.

MUELLER SUBMITS LONG-AWAITED RUSSIA PROBE REPORT TO JUSTICE DEPARTMENT

Hemingway began by noting that the “Russia narrative” predates the Mueller probe, having begun circulating during the 2016 election after the creation of the infamous Clinton campaign-funded Steele dossier, which pushed the theory that then-Republican candidate Donald Trump was a “Russian agent.”

“We have, for the last three years … frequently [witnessed] hysteria about treasonous collusion with Russia to steal the 2016 election,” Hemingway told the panel. “The fact [is] that there are no more indictments coming and the fact [is] that all of the indictments that we’ve seen thus far have been for process crimes or things unrelated to what we were told by so many people in the media was ‘treasonous collusion’ to steal the 2016 election.”

“If there is nothing there that matches what we’ve heard from the media for many years, there needs to be a reckoning and the people who spread this theory both inside and outside the government who were not critical and who did not behave appropriately need to be held accountable,” she added.

"The people who spread this theory both inside and outside the government … and who did not behave appropriately need to be held accountable."

— Mollie Hemingway, senior editor, the Federalist

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Mason told the panel that there’s likely “some relief” in the White House, particularly from Jared Kushner, the president’s son-in-law and top adviser. And while he insisted it was “too early” to draw major conclusions, he later added that those who attacked Mueller’s credibility throughout his investigation will have to walk back their hostility if he concludes that there was no collusion, including President Trump.

Meanwhile, Continetti suggested that the Mueller report could be the “greatest anticlimax in American history,” and that the entire investigation could be “for nothing” because it was “an investigation without a crime.” He did, however, insist that the “battle will continue” as the White House will fight Congress on transparency of the Mueller findings.

Source: Fox News Politics

Donald Trump Jr. mocked “collusion truthers” in a tweet Friday in response to Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s long-awaited submission of his final report on the investigation into Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election.

Minutes before, Trump Jr. tweeted: "Well that’s going to make it a bit harder for the MSM and Dems to spin but they’ll do it anyway” in response to Washington Post reporter Josh Dawsey, who posted "DOJ letter says there was not a single time Mueller was blocked from an action he wanted to take."

DONALD TRUMP JR. SAYS FAMILY HAS NO FEARS OVER MUELLER INVESTIGATION REPORT

Mueller is not recommending any further indictments, a senior Department of Justice officials told Fox News. Trump Jr. retweeted a post by GOP strategist Andrew Surabian that read: "The #CollusionTruthers in the Dem Party and their friends on @CNN/@MSNBC don’t seem very happy today, I wonder why?"

Attorney General William Barr notified members of the Senate and House judiciary committees on Friday about the report on Friday.

"I am reviewing the report and anticipate that I may be in a position to advise you of the Special Counsel’s principal conclusions as soon as this weekend," Barr wrote, according to Newsweek.

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President Trump remained silent on Twitter about the conclusion of Mueller’s probe on Twitter, not mentioning the report once. He will spend the weekend in Florida to meet with Carribean leaders to discuss the ongoing crisis in Venezuela and its leader Nicolas Maduro.

Source: Fox News Politics

MSNBC host Chris Matthews expressed outrage on Friday upon hearing reports that Special Counsel Robert Mueller had completed his Russia investigation and submitted it to the attorney general – with further indictments not expected.

SCHIFF REJECTS REPORTS THAT INDICTMENTS ARE OVER

Matthews began his show by summarizing the breaking news, but stressed that Mueller handed his report to the Department of Justice “without ever directly interviewing the president of the United States.”

“That means no charges against the president, his children or his associates after all those meetings with the Russians,” a visibly upset Matthews told his viewers.

The liberal cable news host opened the discussion to the panel, telling them his “biggest question” was “How can the president be pointed to as leading collusion with Russia, aiding a Russian conspiracy to interfere with our elections if none of his henchmen, none of his children, none of his associates have been indicted?”

NBC News national security reporter Ken Dilanian responded by telling Matthews that Trump couldn’t be indicted “in a criminal sense” since Mueller’s office “didn’t have it,” adding that the president “couldn’t conspire with himself.”

“Maybe he missed the boat here,” Matthews responded. “Because we know about the Trump Tower meeting in June 2016, we know about the meeting at the cigar bar with Kilimnik. My God, we know about all of those meetings with Kislyak at the Republican convention in Cleveland. All these dots we’re now to believe don’t connect.”

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“Well, that’s the conclusion in front of us,” Dilanian told Matthews. “All of that stuff was suggestive, it didn’t prove anything.”

“Why was there never an interrogation of this president?” Matthews shot back. “We were told for weeks by experts, ‘You cannot deal with an obstruction-of-justice charge or investigation without getting the motive… How could they let Trump off the hook?… He will not be charged with obstruction of justice or collusion without having to sit down with the Special Counsel Mueller and answer his damn questions. How could that happen?”

Source: Fox News Politics

MSNBC host Chris Matthews expressed outrage on Friday upon hearing reports that Special Counsel Robert Mueller had completed his Russia investigation and submitted it to the attorney general – with further indictments not expected.

SCHIFF REJECTS REPORTS THAT INDICTMENTS ARE OVER

Matthews began his show by summarizing the breaking news, but stressed that Mueller handed his report to the Department of Justice “without ever directly interviewing the president of the United States.”

“That means no charges against the president, his children or his associates after all those meetings with the Russians,” a visibly upset Matthews told his viewers.

The liberal cable news host opened the discussion to the panel, telling them his “biggest question” was “How can the president be pointed to as leading collusion with Russia, aiding a Russian conspiracy to interfere with our elections if none of his henchmen, none of his children, none of his associates have been indicted?”

NBC News national security reporter Ken Dilanian responded by telling Matthews that Trump couldn’t be indicted “in a criminal sense” since Mueller’s office “didn’t have it,” adding that the president “couldn’t conspire with himself.”

“Maybe he missed the boat here,” Matthews responded. “Because we know about the Trump Tower meeting in June 2016, we know about the meeting at the cigar bar with Kilimnik. My God, we know about all of those meetings with Kislyak at the Republican convention in Cleveland. All these dots we’re now to believe don’t connect.”

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“Well, that’s the conclusion in front of us,” Dilanian told Matthews. “All of that stuff was suggestive, it didn’t prove anything.”

“Why was there never an interrogation of this president?” Matthews shot back. “We were told for weeks by experts, ‘You cannot deal with an obstruction-of-justice charge or investigation without getting the motive… How could they let Trump off the hook?… He will not be charged with obstruction of justice or collusion without having to sit down with the Special Counsel Mueller and answer his damn questions. How could that happen?”

Source: Fox News Politics

The submission of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report to the Justice Department prompted a wave of reaction from the political world.

Attorney General William Barr notified key congressional leaders that Mueller finished his investigation in a letter late Friday, saying he could have a summary of the probe’s findings as soon as this weekend.

Much of the reaction – from lawmakers, presidential candidates and Trump allies – was focused on the timing of Barr’s full summary. Many urged the attorney general to release as much as possible, as soon as possible, to the public.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky.: 

“The attorney general said he intends to provide as much information as possible. As I have said previously, I sincerely hope he will do so as soon as he can, and with as much openness and transparency as possible.”

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif.:

“It is imperative for Mr. Barr to make the full report public and provide its underlying documentation and findings to Congress,” the Democratic leadership said in a statement. “Attorney General Barr must not give President Trump, his lawyers or his staff any ‘sneak preview’ of Special Counsel Mueller’s findings or evidence, and the White House must not be allowed to interfere in decisions about what parts of those findings or evidence are made public.”

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y.:

“A.G. Barr has confirmed the completion of the special counsel investigation. We look forward to getting the full Mueller report and related materials. Transparency and the public interest demand nothing less. The need for public faith in the rule of law must be the priority.”

House Judiciary Committee Ranking Member Doug Collins, R-Ga.:

“I fully expect the Justice Department to release the special counsel’s report to this committee and to the public without delay and to the maximum extent permitted by law.”

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C.:

“I have always believed it was important that Mr. Mueller be allowed to do his job without interference; and that has been accomplished.”

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., said his panel would “subpoena Mueller” if they do not release evidence and a large majority of the report.

Senate Intelligence Committee Ranking Member Mark Warner, D-Va.: 

“It is also critical that all documents related to the special counsel’s investigation be preserved and made available to the appropriate committees.”

House Minority Whip Steve Scalise, R-La.:

“The reports that there will be no new indictments confirm what we’ve known all along: there was never any collusion with Russia.”

House Majority Whip Steny Hoyer, D-Md.: 

“I urge the attorney general to perform his duty to country and Constitution, ensure that this report is made available to a Congress and the public, and resist any attempt by the White House to interfere.”

Donald Trump Jr.: “#CollusionTruthers,” the president’s eldest son tweeted Friday.

Michael Avenatti:

“I am not at all surprised by the inquiry coming to a conclusion. And I have said all along that I believed the final report would be very anticlimactic.”

Source: Fox News Politics

A well-known and often polarizing figure in Washington political circles is being nominated to fill a vacancy on the Federal Reserve’s seven-member board, President Trump announced Friday.

Stephen Moore, a conservative economic analyst and frequent critic of the Fed, served as an adviser to Trump during the 2016 campaign. In that role, the loyalist helped draft Trump’s tax cut plan.

Trump can score points with his core supporters — and with the majority Republicans in the Senate — by embracing a conservative activist for a Fed role that would make him a watchdog over the economy.

“FreedomWorks is proud to see President Trump offer such a prestigious position to one of our own,” said Adam Brandon, president of that conservative advocacy group. “I have no doubt that Stephen Moore would make an excellent member of the Federal Reserve Board.”

MUELLER NOT RECOMMENDING FURTHER INDICTMENTS AFTER REPORT TURNOVER

A fervent advocate of tax cuts, Moore is close to Larry Kudlow, head of the White House National Economic Council. The two collaborated in shaping the tax overhaul that Trump signed into law at the end of 2017, leading to changes that largely favored tax cuts for corporations and wealthier individuals with the idea of spurring investment and growth.

Trump has been harshly critical of the Fed’s rate increases even after the central bank announced this week that it foresees no hikes this year. Moore, formerly chief economist for the conservative Heritage Foundation, also has been critical of the policies of Chairman Jerome Powell.

The Senate must confirm Moore’s nomination. Given his sharply partisan reputation, Moore could spark opposition among Democrats in the Senate.

Trump in his first two years in office has been able to reshape the central bank. He nominated four of the current five members. And he tapped Powell, who had been chosen for the Fed board by President Barack Obama, to succeed Janet Yellen as chairman. If confirmed by the Senate, Moore would fill one of two vacancies on the board.

The selection of Moore marks a deviation from Trump’s previous choices for the board, toward a more public figure who long has pushed conservative economic and political ideology.

With Trump as president, Moore became a sharp critic of Fed policies to shrink its balance sheet and return rates to what the central bank sees as a neutral level — neither stimulating nor hindering growth. He went so far as to suggest that Trump might consider trying to fire Powell for the rate hikes under his watch.

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Moore frequently has praised the administration, and he co-wrote the 2018 book “Trumponomics.” His partner on that book was Art Laffer, who pioneered the Republican doctrine that lower tax rates would accelerate economic growth in ways that could minimize debt.

But federal debt has jumped since Trump’s overhaul to the tax code, surging nearly 77 percent through the first four months of fiscal 2019 compared with the previous year.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Rep. Adam Schiff rejected reports that no more Mueller indictments are coming, and suggested he would call the special counsel before a House panel if necessary to learn what is in the report.

“If necessary, we will call Bob Mueller or others before our committee, I would imagine the judiciary committee may call the attorney general if necessary,” the California Democrat said during an interview on CNN.

“At the end of the day, the department is under a statutory obligation to provide our committee with any information regarding significant intelligence activities, including counterintelligence. And it’s hard to imagine anything more significant than what Bob Mueller has been investigating.

“We have a right to be informed, and we will demand to be informed about it.”

‘THIS IS A GRAND SLAM:’ TRUMP TEAM ‘CONFIDENT’ NO COLLUSION IN MUELLER REPORT

I think it’s entirely possible if not likely that there will be other indictments

— House Intelligence Committee Chairman Rep. Adam Schiff

Schiff was then asked if he would be satisfied if “the most sensitive information” obtained by Mueller was only shared with the so-called “gang of eight.”

“No, it would not suffice. Now, there may be a select sub-section of information they feel they can only share because of the very sensitive sources which derived the information, but he volumes of information that has been found needs to be shared with the whole committee so we can evaluate what steps have to be taken to protect the country.”

“We’re going to need to have the same sort of discovery that we saw during the last Congress, and indeed it may be far more extensive than that, to make sure that U.S. policy is driven by U.S. interest and not because the president or anyone around him is looking to make money from the Kremlin on a tower or anything else.

Schiff did not answer host Wolf Blitzer’s question as to whether or not any potential testimony would be public or behind closed doors.

MUELLER NOT RECOMMENDING FURTHER INDICTMENTS AFTER REPORT TURNOVER

In a separate interview with MSNBC, Schiff disagreed with reports there will be no more indictments forthcoming, saying instead it is “entirely possible, if not likely, that there will be” more.

“Well, what it means is that the office of the special counsel, which is essentially a contract attorney to the Justice Department, that that office won’t be bringing any further indictments,” he said.

“It doesn’t mean, of course, that main justice or the Seventh District of New York and the Eastern District or others may not bring indictments,”

“In fact, given the lengthy redactions in many of the pleadings of the special counsel eluding to other investigations, I think it’s entirely possible if not likely that there will be other indictments.

READ THE LETTER: AG BILL BARR’S LETTER TO LAWMAKERS ANNOUNCING HE RECEIVED MUELLER REPORT

“Now, how central or peripheral they’ll be to the core issues of potential conspiracy is yet to be determined.”

President Trump’s legal team projected confidence Friday that Special Counsel Robert Mueller did not find collusion connected to the president, as he turned over the results of his exhaustive probe into Russian meddling during the 2016 presidential election.

“This marks the end of the Russia investigation. We await a disclosure of the facts,” attorney Rudy Giuliani told Fox News late Friday. “We are confident that there is no finding of collusion by the president and this underscores what the president has been saying from the beginning — that he did nothing wrong.”

Giuliani’s statement comes after Mueller transmitted his report to Attorney General William Barr.

MSNBC HOST CHUCK TODD, PANEL HERALD ‘REMARKABLE’ MUELLER INVESTIGATION, SAY IT WILL ‘GO DOWN IN HISTORY’

The conclusions are not yet known, but Barr indicated he might be able to advise Congress of the main takeaways as early as this weekend.

That alone was cause for optimism in Trump world.

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“This is a grand slam for President Trump. If Barr says he can brief Congress by this weekend, that means he has nothing,” said Joe diGenova, a former U.S. attorney who has advised Trump on the probe.

Fox News’ Brooke Singman, John Roberts and Jake Gibson contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

The Democratic presidential contenders are uniformly calling for Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report on Russian tampering in the 2016 presidential election to be released publicly – while at least one high-profile candidate wants Attorney General Bill Barr to testify on the findings.

Minutes after the news broke Friday afternoon that the long-awaited report had been submitted to Barr, the White House hopefuls quickly fired off statements calling for the Trump administration to ensure the documents go public.

TRUMP TEAM CONFIDENT AFTER MUELLER REPORT DROP

“Attorney General Barr—release the Mueller report to the American public. Now,” Sen. Elizabeth Warren on Massachusetts tweeted.

“As Donald Trump said, ‘Let it come out.’ I call on the Trump administration to make Special Counsel Mueller’s full report public as soon as possible. No one, including the president, is above the law,” Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont wrote on Twitter.

Sen. Kamala Harris of California called for “total transparency” – then upped the ante by calling on Barr to testify.

“The Department of Justice launched the Special Counsel investigation to get to the bottom of foreign interference in the 2016 election and any other illegal actions. A declassified report must be made public immediately and Attorney General Barr must publicly testify under oath about the investigation and its findings, and provide all underlying materials to the appropriate Congressional committees,” the former California attorney general said in a statement.

Both Harris, Warren and Sen. Cory Booker of New Jersey have all started petitions to pressure the administration to release the report – though the White House has deferred to Barr on next steps. Booker also is using the report drop to raise money for his campaign.

“This report should be made public immediately,” he tweeted.

MUELLER NOT RECOMMENDING MORE INDICTMENTS: SOURCE

It was a similar sentiment on Twitter from former Rep. Beto O’Rourke of Texas.

“Release the Mueller report to the American people,” he wrote.

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York said, “report should be made public without any delay. The American people have a right to know its findings.”

And Sen. Amy Klobuchar tweeted “BREAKING: The Mueller report is complete. Attorney General Barr must release the full report to the public. The American people deserve to know the facts.”

Mueller was appointed nearly two years ago to investigate the election tampering and any possible collusion between Moscow and Trump’s 2016 campaign to swing the presidential election in the then-GOP nominee’s favor. Barr and his team are now reviewing the report and creating a summary document that will be sent to Congress, and possibly released.

Former San Antonio, Texas mayor and former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Julian Castro tweeted that the “American people deserve to know the full truth about Russia’s interference in our democracy. The Special Counsel report must be publicly released in its entirety.”

Former three-term Rep. John Delaney wrote the “patriotic action for the Attorney General is to release the entire Mueller Report to the American people. We paid for it and this moment requires transparency.”

Source: Fox News Politics

President Trump’s legal team projected confidence Friday that Special Counsel Robert Mueller did not find collusion connected to the president, as he turned over the results of his exhaustive probe into Russian meddling during the 2016 presidential election.

“This marks the end of the Russia investigation. We await a disclosure of the facts,” attorney Rudy Giuliani told Fox News late Friday. “We are confident that there is no finding of collusion by the president and this underscores what the president has been saying from the beginning — that he did nothing wrong.”

MUELLER NOT RECOMMENDING FURTHER INDICTMENTS AFTER REPORT TURNOVER

Giuliani’s statement comes after Mueller transmitted his report to Attorney General William Barr.

The conclusions are not yet known, but Barr indicated he might be able to advise Congress of the main takeaways as early as this weekend.

That alone was cause for optimism in Trump world.

“This is a grand slam for President Trump. If Barr says he can brief Congress by this weekend, that means he has nothing,” said Joe diGenova, a former U.S. attorney who has advised Trump on the probe.

Giuliani and Trump attorney Jay Sekulow also told Fox News on Friday that they are "pleased that the Office of Special Counsel has delivered its report,” noting: "Attorney General Barr will determine the appropriate next steps."

Concluding an investigation that has been tight-lipped from the start, Barr quietly sent a letter to Republican and Democratic members of the House and Senate Judiciary Committees late Friday alerting them to the probe’s completion.

"Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III has concluded his investigation of the Russian interference in the 2016 election and related matters," Barr’s letter to House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y.; Ranking Member Doug Collins, R-Ga.; Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C.; and Ranking Member Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., read.

MUELLER REPORT DELIVERED

"Separately, I intend to consult with Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and Special Counsel Mueller to determine what other information from the report can be released to Congress and the public consistent with law, including the Special Counsel regulations, and the Department’s long-standing practices and policies."

Barr also said in the letter that he "may be in a position to advise you of the Special Counsel’s principal conclusions as soon as this weekend."

Despite the fact that the investigation has come to a close, after almost two years, Mueller still remains special counsel, according to Justice Department officials.

In a statement on Friday, Collins said that he looked forward to reviewing Barr’s report "carefully."

"I fully expect the Justice Department to release the special counsel’s report to this committee and to the public without delay and to the maximum extent permitted by law," Collins said.

Nadler weighed in on Twitter calling for transparency.

"A.G. Barr has confirmed the completion of the Special Counsel investigation. We look forward to getting the full Mueller report and related materials. Transparency and the public interest demand nothing less. The need for public faith in the rule of law must be the priority," Nadler tweeted Friday.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., released a joint statement calling for the release of the report.

“It is imperative for Mr. Barr to make the full report public and provide its underlying documentation and findings to Congress," they said in a statement.

"Attorney General Barr must not give President Trump, his lawyers or his staff any ‘sneak preview’ of Special Counsel Mueller’s findings or evidence, and the White House must not be allowed to interfere in decisions about what parts of those findings or evidence are made public."

Fox News’ Doug McKelway and Jake Gibson contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Special Counsel Robert Mueller is not recommending any further indictments as part of his sweeping Russia investigation which effectively ended Friday, according to a senior Justice Department official.

Mueller transmitted to the Justice Department the report on his team’s probe into Russian meddling and potential collusion with Trump campaign associates during the 2016 presidential election. While the probe’s conclusions are not yet known, the investigation already has led to indictments, convictions or guilty pleas for nearly three-dozen people and three companies.

But a senior DOJ official told Fox News Mueller is “not recommending any further indictments.”

Information about the contents of the report could start to emerge in the coming days.

There has been speculation for the entirety of the investigation, lasting nearly two years, on whether President Trump or his family members could face criminal consequences.

Trump’s attorney Rudy Giuliani told Fox News on Friday that the Trump legal team is “confident” in the results of the report.

“This marks the end of the investigation. We await a disclosure of the facts,” Giuliani said. “We are confident that there is no finding of collusion by the President and this underscores what the President has been saying from the beginning – that he did nothing wrong.”

The president has repeatedly blasted the investigation as a “witch hunt” and has maintained his innocence, stating since May 2017 that there was “no collusion” between himself, or members of his campaign, with Russia during the 2016 presidential election.

Mueller has charged 26 Russian nationals while three Russian companies have been charged with interfering in the 2016 presidential election.

But none of the Trump associates connected to Trump have been charged with crimes related to collusion, though Mueller’s team charged former Trump associate Roger Stone in January with lying about his communications with WikiLeaks, which published hacked Democratic emails during the election.

Other convictions include: former national security adviser Michael Flynn and former campaign adviser George Papadopoulos, who both pleaded guilty to making false statements in 2017.

Former campaign adviser Rick Gates in 2018 pleaded guilty and former campaign chairman Paul Manafort was convicted and later pleaded guilty in a separate financial crimes case dating back before the 2016 election.

Former Trump lawyer Michael Cohen pleaded guilty to making false statements in a case brought by Mueller in November.

Alex van der Zwaan, a London-based lawyer, pleaded guilty to making false statements this year, and Richard Pinedo, a California man, pleaded guilty to identity fraud in 2018.

Fox News’ John Roberts and Alex Pappas contributed to this report. 

Source: Fox News Politics

Special Counsel Robert Mueller submitted his long-awaited report on the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential race and possible collusion with Trump associates on Friday, March 22.

Almost immediately, Democratic leaders reiterated their calls for the report to be made public as soon as possible.

The report was submitted to Attorney General Bill Barr, but the specific contents have not yet been revealed. Mueller is, however, not expected to recommend any further indictments.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., released a joint statement on the report after the early-evening disclosure on the submission.

“Now that Special Counsel Mueller has submitted his report to the Attorney General, it is imperative for Mr. Barr to make the full report public and provide its underlying documentation and findings to Congress," the statement said. "Attorney General Barr must not give President Trump, his lawyers or his staff any ‘sneak preview’ of Special Counsel Mueller’s findings or evidence, and the White House must not be allowed to interfere in decisions about what parts of those findings or evidence are made public."

“The Special Counsel’s investigation focused on questions that go to the integrity of our democracy itself: whether foreign powers corruptly interfered in our elections, and whether unlawful means were used to hinder that investigation," the statement continued. "The American people have a right to the truth. The watchword is transparency.”

Presidential candidates Senator Cory Booker, D-N.J. and Senator Kamala Harris, D-Cal. also joined in on Twitter with similar insistent demands that the report be public.

This is a developing story. Please check back for updates.

Fox News’ Elizabeth Zwirz, Alex Pappas and Jake Gibson contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Attorney General Bill Barr has delivered a letter to Capitol Hill announcing he has received Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential race and possible collusion with Trump associates.

Mueller’s report was delivered earlier Friday afternoon to the Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein’s office and it was delivered to Barr’s office within minutes, a senior DOJ official told Fox News. The White House was notified that the DOJ had received the report around 4:45 p.m., before lawmakers on Capitol Hill were informed.

MUELLER SUBMITS LONG-AWAITED RUSSIA PROBE REPORT TO JUSTICE DEPARTMENT

READ THE FULL LETTER BELOW:

Dear Chairman Graham, Chairman Nadler, Ranking Member Feinstein, and Ranking Member Collins:

        I write to notify you pursuant to 28 C.F.R. 600.9(a)(3) that Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III has concluded his investigation of Russian interference in the 2016 election and related matters. In addition to this notification, the Special Counsel regulations require that I provide you with a "description and explanation of instances (if any) in which the Attorney General" or acting Attorney General "concluded that a proposed action by a Special Counsel was so in appropriate or unwarranted under established Departmental practices that it should not be pursued." 28 C.F.R. 600.9(a)(3). 

There were no such instances during the Special Counsel’s investigation.

The Special Counsel has submitted to me today a "confidential report explaining the prosecution or declination decisions" he has reached, as required by 28 C.F.R. 600.8(c). I am reviewing the report and anticipate that I may be in a position to advise you of the Special Counsel’s principal conclusions as soon as this weekend.

Separately, I intend to consult with Deputy Attorney General Rosenstein and Special Counsel Mueller to determine what other information from the report can be released to Congress and the public consistent with the law, including the Special Counsel regulations, and the Department’s long-standing practices and policies.  I remain committed to as much transparency as possible, and I will keep you informed as to the status of my review.  

Finally, the Special Counsel regulations provide that “the Attorney General may determine that public release of” this notification “would be in the public interest.” 28 C.F.R. 600.9 (c).  I have so determined, and I will disclose this letter to the public after delivering it to you.

Sincerely, 

William P. Barr
Attorney General

Source: Fox News Politics

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On the roster: Mueller submits long-awaited Russia probe report – Poll: Winning is focus for Dems, not ideology in 2020 – House Dems’ campaign arm seeks primary truce - Audible: Everybody’s gone gaga – He was just trying to get to Electric Avenue 

MUELLER SUBMITS LONG-AWAITED RUSSIA PROBE REPORT
Fox News: “Special Counsel Robert Mueller has submitted to Attorney General Bill Barr his long-awaited report on the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential race and possible collusion with Trump associates — marking the end of the politically explosive probe and the beginning of a new battle over its contents and implications. The report was delivered earlier Friday afternoon to the Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein’s office and it was delivered to Barr’s office within minutes, a senior DOJ official told Fox News. The White House was notified that the DOJ had received the report around 4:45 p.m., before lawmakers on Capitol Hill were informed. Both Barr and Rosenstein have seen the report, according to a senior DOJ official. White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders tweeted following the report’s drop. ‘The next steps are up to Attorney General Barr, and we look forward to the process taking its course,’ she said. ‘The White House has not received or been briefed on the Special Counsel’s report.’ Several lawmakers, including Sens. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C. and Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., received a letter about the report’s drop.”

THE RULEBOOK: PROOF IS IN THE PUDDING
“Could any further proof be required of the republican complexion of this system, the most decisive one might be found in its absolute prohibition of titles of nobility, both under the federal and the State governments; and in its express guaranty of the republican form to each of the latter.” – James Madison, Federalist No. 39

TIME OUT: A DIFFERENT PRESIDENTIAL RECORD  
AJC: “When Jimmy Carter left office in 1981 … a friend pointed out that Carter, at the tender age of 56, could expect to live at least until 80-years-old. … March 22, 2019, marks yet another milestone. While it is not his birthday, Carter becomes the oldest living former president in United States history. At the age of 94 years and 172 days, he passes George H.W. Bush, who was 94 years, 171 days when he died last November. ‘We at the Carter Center sure are rooting for him and are grateful for his long life of service that has benefited millions of the world’s poorest people,’ the center said in a statement. … Already, Carter had set for presidential record for living the longest number of years out of office, at 38 plus. But then again, he started the job young. When he was elected in 1976, Carter was only 52-years-old, making him the 17th youngest elected president in history.”

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SCOREBOARD
Trump job performance 
Average approval: 
42.4 percent
Average disapproval: 52.8 percent
Net Score: -10.4 points
Change from one week ago: up 1.8 points 
[Average includes: USA Today/Suffolk: 48% approve – 49% disapprove; CNN: 43% approve – 51% disapprove; Gallup: 39% approve – 57% disapprove; Monmouth University: 44% approve – 52% disapprove; Quinnipiac University: 38% approve – 55% disapprove.]

POLL: WINNING IS FOCUS FOR DEMS, NOT IDEOLOGY IN 2020
USA Today: “As the 2020 presidential field takes shape, Democratic voters by double digits say they are more interested in nominating a candidate who can defeat President Trump than one they agree with most on the issues, a new USA TODAY/Suffolk University Poll finds. By 55-35 percent, the Democrats surveyed endorse electability over ideological purity even though they also embrace progressive priorities such as the Green New Deal. They are even inclined to be open to a nominee who espouses socialism. The debate over balancing policy positions with electoral appeal is always part of the calculation in campaigns. Almost a year before the Iowa caucuses open the nominating contests, it has taken on particular intensity as a sprawling field jockeys to challenge a Republican president who inflames the opposition. … Among Democratic and independent voters combined, sentiment was more closely divided: 48 percent say they want the Democratic Party to nominate ‘a candidate who can win, even if different from my priorities,’ while 38 percent prefer ‘a candidate in line with my priorities, even if it is harder to win.’”

Trump is ready, revealing his ‘dream’ 2020 rival - Fox News: “President Trump, in an extensive interview with Fox Business Network’s Maria Bartiromo, accused Democrats embracing ideas like court-packing and the Green New Deal of becoming ‘radicalized’ — while voicing confidence as he sized up the ever-expanding field of potential 2020 opponents. The president mocked the Democratic contenders for ‘saying a lot of weird things,’ calling the Green New Deal ‘the most preposterous thing’ and blasting Beto O’Rourke’s idea of taking down sections of border wall. But asked which candidate in the massive field he’d truly like to run against in 2020, Trump threw out a few names: ‘I mean, I’d love to have [Joe] Biden. I’d love to have Bernie [Sanders], I’d love to have Beto,’ he said, adding: ‘I mean, Beto seems to be the one the press has chosen. The press seems to have chosen Beto. … When I watch Beto, I say we could dream about that.’”

Drucker: ‘Republicans resigned to Trump losing 2020 popular vote’ – WashEx: “Senior Republicans are resigned to President Trump losing the popular vote in 2020, conceding the limits of the flamboyant incumbent’s political appeal and revealing just how central the Electoral College has become to the party’s White House prospects. Some Republicans say the problem is Trump’s populist brand of partisan grievance. It’s an attitude tailor-made for the Electoral College in the current era of regionally Balkanized politics, but anathema to attracting a broad, national coalition that can win the most votes, as past presidents did when seeking re-election amid a booming economy. Others argue that neither Trump, nor possibly any Republican, could win the popular vote when most big states are overwhelmingly liberal. … If Trump wins a second term without the popular vote, it would mark the first time in American history that the candidate who finished second in overall votes won consecutive presidential elections.”

What’s Beto all about? - WaPo: “In his first blitz as a candidate for president, O’Rourke has dealt with nagging questions — Is a failed Senate candidate ready for the presidency? Is he serious about policy? — with real-time prose. Other candidates talk in applause lines, while O’Rourke speaks in paragraphs, with lots of asides and emphasis and aphorisms. The result (so far) is the first Democratic campaign to really shake up this race since Kamala Harris’s enormous early crowds surprised her rivals and boosted her in public polls. It is not like any other campaign — by design. He’s still figuring this whole thing out. More than any other candidate for the presidency, O’Rourke admits that he does not have all the answers and will get things wrong. He thanks crowds for telling him what he did not know. He thanks reporters for being patient with him — after some complaints about access in Iowa, he began to hold 10- to 15-minute news conferences after nearly every event.”

Donors shy from Biden - CNBC: “Several top Democratic donors have told former Vice President Joe Biden that they won’t help him raise funds in the early stages of the party’s 2020 presidential primary, CNBC has learned. Their reason: skepticism that Biden actually can win the Democratic primary. Biden, who has yet to announce whether he will run, has reached out to leading financiers over the past week to see whether they will help him raise money for a presidential run. … However, during those calls, some high-profile donors told Biden that they will not commit to bundling for him, at least in the early stages of the primary, said the people, who declined to be named. The donors told Biden they’re not yet convinced he can overtake the younger, more diverse and progressive field, and that they are going to wait to see how he competes in the race, the people added.”

Many 2020 Dems will not attend AIPAC summit – AP: “Multiple Democratic presidential candidates said Thursday that they won’t attend the American Israel Public Affairs Committee’s annual conference in Washington next week. Sen. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, Sen. Bernie Sanders of Vermont, former U.S. Rep. Beto O’Rourke of Texas, Sen. Kamala Harris of California and Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, are among the 2020 contenders who have decided not to attend. Former Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz, who is considering an independent bid for president, will also avoid the AIPAC conference. It comes as the liberal advocacy group MoveOn has called on Democratic presidential candidates to skip this year’s policy conference, saying AIPAC had tried to thwart the Iran nuclear deal and had employed ‘anti-Muslim and anti-Arab rhetoric.’ By not attending, the Democratic candidates can demonstrate their progressive bona fides in an increasingly crowded 2020 field.”

HOUSE DEMS’ CAMPAIGN ARM SEEKS PRIMARY TRUCE 
National Journal: “The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee is making an early move to deter primary challenges against sitting incumbents in the caucus with a new policy aimed in part at protecting the new majority. The campaign arm on Friday sent out a list of hiring standards to more than 100 political firms, including one provision that made clear it will neither contract with nor recommend to House candidates any political vendors that work to oust sitting members of Congress. That offers key protection to the caucus’s moderate members in battleground seats, where House control will be won or lost. It is intended to help stymie attempts by insurgent progressive groups who plan to primary incumbents deemed insufficiently liberal on key issues, but also to shield members of the party’s ascendant liberal wing who represent safe Democratic territory and could face intraparty challenges of their own.”

PLAY-BY-PLAY
Marine Corps commandant: Border deployments an ‘unacceptable risk’ - LAT

As Washington awaits Mueller, a look at how Trump has performed under pressure before - Politico

Cornyn, Joaquin Castro already locking horns ahead of potential 2020 Senate race Dallas Morning News

Meet the legislative linebackers from the NFL Roll Call

Charles Lane: ‘Red America and blue America depend on each other. That’s how it should be.’ - WaPo

Dems want Trump’s business tax filings as well as his personal tax returns - Politico

AUDIBLE: EVERYBODY’S GONE GAGA 
“It’s like waiting for a baby… If the report is good, I’ll give out cigars.” – Rudy Giuliani talking about the wait for the Mueller report to the WaPo in a phone interview on Friday. 

ANY GIVEN SUNDAY
This weekend Mr. Sunday will sit down with Rep. Jim Himes, D-Conn. Watch “Fox News Sunday with Chris Wallace.” Check local listings for broadcast times in your area.

#mediabuzz - Host Howard Kurtz has the latest take on the week’s media coverage. Watch #mediabuzz Sundays at 11 a.m. ET.

FROM THE BLEACHERS
“It would be very helpful, given all the talk about eliminating the Electoral College, if you could enlighten us regarding what would be required to change it. Most of the angst about this situation seems to stem from the perception of ‘the unfairness’ of it all, when I believe the original purpose was to ensure that all states got an appropriate voice. The ‘popular’ vote for Hillary came from a few very populous places and was not representative of the country as a whole. In addition, as a number of states have passed legislation to assign all their delegates to the popular vote as an ‘end run’, as it were, around the Constitution, I would guess that would be challengeable legally and ultimately end up going through the constitutional process I initially requested that you elucidate.” – Michael McEvoy, Houston

[Ed. note: The way to eliminate or alter the Electoral College is straight forward but hard: Amend the Constitution. A number of Democratic leaning states, however, have a plan to attack the Constitution and eliminate the Electoral College without putting the matter before all 50 states. Thirteen states have joined a compact in which they have agreed to award their electoral votes to whichever candidate wins the national popular vote, regardless of how their citizens cast their ballots. This deal would kick in once the states with the combined total of 270 electoral votes have joined the compact. Much that is lost in the discussion about the Electoral College is its actual purpose. We tend to see it as a practical, political matter: Something that is good for Republicans and bad for Democrats. The Electoral College, though, is more about the balance of power than it is about partisan control. Taking away the value of states as individual political units would further decrease their ability to counterbalance the national government. Remember Madison’s belief that ambition must be made to counteract ambition. There is very little left in the way of the federal government’s ambitions, regardless of who is in power.]

“I am a long time and very satisfied subscriber to ‘Halftime Report’ and was recently traveling in the New Zealand and Australia area and at times, WiFi was spotty or nonexistent and thus it was difficult to keep up with our news.  Consequently, I have an even greater appreciation for the daily content of your ‘note’ as I was able to stay current with our political news and thus, indirectly with other happenings… I looked forward to each opportunity to receive emails and sit back and catchup. One of our guides in Australia told us about their mandated voting laws which I found to be very interesting… the voting age is 18 and if a person neglects to vote, they are fined and possibly face a day in court.  The fine for a first offense is $20.00 which is not an exorbitant amount of money but reports have noted that it does seem to be enough of an incentive to achieve a very high percentage of voter turnout at election time. I also subscribe to the ‘Halftime Report’ on Fox Nation and never fail to pick up an ‘I didn’t know or realize that’ not to mention the comfortable and fun conversation between you while ‘Brainstorming with Stirewalt’!” – Patricia White, North Myrtle Beach, S.C.

[Ed. note: In the spirit of full disclosure, Ms. White, I think our readers should know that you are the grandmother of our own dear Brianna. But that’s a bias I can definitely allow here! Many Americans have observed approvingly of Australia’s compulsory voting regime. If you think what’s wrong with our politics is that not enough people are participating, then one can see why. I look at it a little differently. The voting franchise is an extraordinary privilege, one that history would rightly regard as unusual. In the United States, we have had universal suffrage since the 1920s by law and the 1960s in reality. It’s extraordinary compared to most of history and much of the world today. If you cannot be bothered to exercise so great a privilege, why on earth would I want you to vote? I think the problem that we have traces its roots to a lack of civics education in which too few Americans understand the value of their votes and an increasingly jumbled political calendar. I have long advocated for making Election Day a federal and national holiday while also curtailing the ever-extending early voting calendar and mail-in balloting. I would like to see a return to a communitarian ethic for American elections. Thank you for your thoughtful question, your high praise and for helping to make such a fine colleague as your granddaughter.]

Share your color commentary: Email us at [email protected] and please make sure to include your name and hometown.

HE WAS JUST TRYING TO GET TO ELECTRIC AVENUE 
KABC: “A slow-speed chase through the San Fernando Valley ended with the suspect breakdancing as officers held him at gunpoint. The chase began in Calabasas when California Highway Patrol officers said a reckless driver failed to yield to commands to stop. The driver led officers on a chase over the 101 Freeway through the San Fernando Valley, north on the 405 Freeway and east onto the 118 Freeway. The suspect mostly drove at speeds under 60 mph, making no evasive maneuvers to escape the officers but also declining to pull over. He slowed to about 20 mph on the 118 and then exited on Laurel Canyon Boulevard. Officers followed closely behind and were finally able to spin out his vehicle with a PIT maneuver in the Pacoima area. He got out of the car and complied with officers’ orders, but then at one point began breakdancing.” 

AND NOW, A WORD FROM CHARLES…
“The conventional perception, incessantly repeated by Democrats and the media, is that Washington dysfunction is the work of the Party of No.” – Charles Krauthammer (1950-2018) writing in the Washington Post on Nov. 6, 2014. 

Chris Stirewalt is the politics editor for Fox News. Brianna McClelland contributed to this report. Want FOX News Halftime Report in your inbox every day? Sign up here.

Source: Fox News Politics

Special Counsel Robert Mueller on Friday submitted to Attorney General Bill Barr his long-awaited report on the investigation into Russian meddling in the 2016 presidential race and possible collusion with Trump associates.

Several lawmakers, including Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., received a letter about the report’s drop

“Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III has concluded his investigation of the Russian interference in the 2016 election and related matters," the letter said.

Barr also said that he “may be in a position to advise you of the Special Counsel’s principal conclusions as soon as this weekend.”

It’s not clear how much, if any, of the report will be made public or provided to Congress. None of Mueller’s findings were immediately released.

The president has repeatedly decried Mueller’s probe as a “witch hunt,” emphatically denying he or his campaign colluded with Russia to undermine Democrat Hillary Clinton’s chances in the 2016 race. The president has alleged a slew of internal “conflicts of interest” from Mueller’s team and has previously said his legal team is drafting a “major counter report” in response to its findings.

Mueller’s investigation, which was initially ordered to look into the 2016 election in May of 2017, has gone on for almost two years. It has expanded to probe financial crimes of Trump associates before the election, conversations Trump’s national security adviser had with the Russians during the transition and whether Trump obstructed justice with his comments and actions related to the probe.

Mueller, the former director of the FBI under Presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama, was appointed special counsel by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein in May of 2017. In his order, Rosenstein directed Mueller to investigate any links or coordination between the Russian government and individuals associated with the Trump campaign, as well any other matters that arose from the investigation.

“If the Special Counsel believes it is necessary and appropriate, the Special Counsel is authorized to prosecute federal crimes arising from the investigation of these matters,” Rosenstein wrote to Mueller.

Since then, Mueller’s team has indicted, convicted, or won guilty pleas from 34 people and three companies as part of an investigation that has also probed issues unrelated to the 2016 campaign.

Twenty six Russian nationals and three Russian companies have been charged with interfering in the 2016 presidential election.

But none of the Trump associates connected to Trump have been charged with crimes related to collusion, though Mueller’s team charged former Trump associate Roger Stone in January with lying about his communications with WikiLeaks, which published hacked Democratic emails during the election.

Other convictions include: former national security adviser Michael Flynn and former campaign adviser George Papadopoulos, who both pleaded guilty to making false statements in 2017.

Former campaign adviser Rick Gates in 2018 pleaded guilty and former campaign chairman Paul Manafort was convicted and later pleaded guilty in a separate financial crimes case dating back before the 2016 election.

Former Trump lawyer Michael Cohen pleaded guilty to making false statements in a case brought by Mueller in November.

Alex van der Zwaan, a London-based lawyer, pleaded guilty to making false statements this year, and Richard Pinedo, a California man, pleaded guilty to identity fraud in 2018.

Mueller has also looked at actions taken by Trump after sworn in as president, like his firing of FBI director James Comey and his ousting of Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

Sessions, once one of President Trump’s most loyal and trusted advisers infuriated Trump over his recusal from the Russia investigation. In March 2017, Sessions announced his plans to recuse himself after reports surfaced detailing undisclosed conversations with Russian ambassador Sergey Kislyak during the campaign.

At the time of his recusal, Sessions said he met with the “relevant senior career department officials” to discuss the issue.

“Having concluded those meetings today, I have decided to recuse myself from any existing or future investigations of any matters related in any way to the campaigns for president of the United States,” Sessions said.

Rosenstein, Sessions’ number two at the Justice Department, then took control of the investigation and decided to appoint Mueller to take over the probe – an investigation Trump has repeatedly lambasted as a “phony witch hunt.”

Rosenstein said at the time, “What I have determined is that based upon the unique circumstances the public interest requires me to place this investigation under the authority of a person who exercises a degree of independence from the normal chain of command.”

Mueller said in a statement, upon his appointment: “I accept this responsibility and will discharge it to the best of my ability.’’

Rosenstein later ceded oversight to then-acting Attorney General Matthew Whitaker when he took over for Sessions. But the report was submitted to Barr, who was confirmed in February by the Senate as attorney general.

This is a developing story. Please check back for updates.

Fox News’ Jake Gibson contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

The chairman of the House Democratic Caucus says that Democrats still support Israel despite numerous Democratic presidential candidates declining to appear at next week’s American Israel Public Affairs Committee’s (AIPAC) annual policy conference.

“I can’t speak for the presidential candidates, but what I can speak for is the House Democratic Caucus who clearly are strongly pro-Israel,” Rep. Hakeem Jeffries, D-N.Y., told “America’s Newsroom” Friday.

“I’ve been to Israel three times, I recognize that there’s shared values, shared strategic interests that are important.  And I think that is the perspective of the overwhelming majority in the House of Representatives.”

FAR-LEFT MOVEON.ORG ASKS 2020 PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES TO SKIP PRO-ISRAEL AIPAC CONFERENCE

Sens. Bernie Sanders, Kamala Harris, Elizabeth Warren, former Rep. Beto O’Rourke and many others have said they won’t be attending the AIPAC conference.

MoveOn.org called on the 2020 Democratic candidates to skip the conference, even though in the past all presidential candidates viewed the AIPAC conference as a crucial campaign stop.

Jeffries, who will speak at AIPAC said that a two-state solution supported by AIPAC was also in the best interest of Israel, Palestine and the United States.

“As far as I’m concerned, AIPAC’s position as I understand it remains to robustly support a two-state solution. I think that’s the right approach,” Jeffries said. “That’s in Israel’s best interest, that’s in the best interest of the democratic aspirations of the Palestinian people, that’s in the best interest for America.”

The Democratic congressman also commented on the importance of the Mueller report and said any talk of President Trump’s impeachment was “premature.”

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“Whether the report exonerates the president, implicates the president or somewhere in between, the American people deserve transparency,” Jeffries said.

“The case should be compelling, the evidence should be overwhelming and the consensus in terms of public sentiment around impeachment should be bipartisan in nature. That’s a strong standard, that’s the right standard, that’s the standard that I agree with.”

Fox News’ Lukas Mikelionis contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

As it attempts to hold and possibly expand upon its newly won congressional majority, the House Democrats’ campaign arm is planting an early marker in hopes of preventing primary challenges against sitting incumbents.

The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) – in a letter sent Friday to more than 100 political firms – clearly stated that it won’t work with, or recommend to House Democratic candidates, any vendors who help to oust incumbents.

MODERATE DEMS FUME OVER OCASIO-CORTEZ INCUMBENT HIT LIST

“The core mission of the DCCC Is electing House Democrats, which includes supporting and protecting incumbents. To that end, the DCCC will not conduct business with, nor recommend to any of its targeted campaigns, any consultant that works with an opponent of a sitting Member of the House Democratic Caucus,” the committee spelled out in a memo obtained by Fox News.

It’s common practice for both the Democratic and Republican House and Senate re-election arms to protect incumbents running for re-election. But the DCCC’s memo, sent extremely early in the election cycle, is a clear signal to Democratic political firms that the millions in contracts dished out each election by the party committee’s independent-expenditure arm will be off limits to them if they work with insurgent candidates. And that could put a big dent in a primary challenger’s ability to take on an incumbent lawmaker.

The move could help moderate Democrats running for re-election in crucial swing districts, and even some controversial liberal lawmakers.

Among those behind the memo were moderate Rep. Henry Cuellar of Texas and progressive firebrand Rep. Ilhan Omar of Minnesota, according to National Journal. Both lawmakers could face 2020 primary challenges.

In 2018 primaries, then-Rep. Michael Capuano of Massachusetts lost his bid for an 11th term in Congress to now-Rep. Ayanna Pressley. And socially conservative Democratic Rep. Dan Lipinski nearly lost in his primary to progressive challenger Marie Newman. Both Newman and Pressley were helped in their bids by well-known political shops.

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez of New York, who’s become a nationally known progressive leader, defeated then-House Democratic Caucus Chairman Joseph Crowley running a low-budget campaign. She could face a primary challenge of her own in 2020. But she’s teaming up with a liberal group that helped her topple Crowley to now suggest a new round of primary challenges in 2020 against establishment House Democrats.

There’s a history of party committees warning political shops to stay away from primary challengers. Most recently, the House and Senate Republican re-election arms in 2014 cut off Jamestown Associates after the firm targeted GOP incumbents.

Source: Fox News Politics

She may have been a top supporter of firebrand Sen. Bernie Sanders in the 2016 Democratic presidential primary, but Hawaii Rep. Tulsi Gabbard is on the fence these days when it comes to a series of far-reaching and controversial proposals being embraced by her 2020 Democratic rivals.

The four-term Hawaii Democrat, national guard officer and Iraq War veteran appeared to push back both on calls to eliminate the Electoral College and scrap the Senate’s filibuster rule – two longstanding political traditions and institutions – in an interview Friday.

TULSI GABBARD JUMPS INTO 2020 WHITE HOUSE RACE

At the same time, Gabbard highlighted her support for reparations for descendants of slaves.

Asked about the Electoral College, Gabbard said “there are reforms that need to take place to make it so that our votes are being cast and counted and represented in the outcome of our elections. I think there are pro and cons to the existing Electoral College and to getting rid of it. What I would think would be important is for us to have a conversation about how we can best move forward.”

But Gabbard seemed to jab at fellow Democrats, saying, “I think it’s unfortunate that too often these calls for changes come about by the side that has lost or suffered as a result of the Electoral College.”

An increasing number of Gabbard’s rivals for the nomination have been supportive of scrapping the Electoral College and having the national popular vote determine the winner of presidential elections.

Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton topped then-Republican nominee Donald Trump by nearly 3 million votes in the 2016 election, but Trump won the presidency thanks to his convincing margin in the Electoral College.

2020 DEMOCRATS TAKE AIM AT THE SENATE FILIBUSTER

Gabbard also is not sold on scrapping the filibuster, the longstanding Senate tradition requiring 60 votes in the 100-member chamber to advance a bill, effectively allowing the minority party to block legislation.

“This is a conversation I think that’s important for the American people to have,” she said.

Gabbard added that it’s “important for us to look at how we solve this or make changes that are not based on partisanship. Often it is the party that is in the minority that is calling for bringing about those changes and then once they get into the majority, they say ‘no, absolutely not. We’re not going to change this.’”

At the moment, the filibuster is actually helping Senate Democrats, enabling its members to slow or stall legislation that the GOP Senate majority and Trump White House might support. The president himself has called for an end to the filibuster, only to be met with opposition from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell.

Democrats hoping to pass a sweeping progressive agenda if they win back the White House are concerned their proposals could get bottlenecked in the Senate, where the Democrats have a shot at winning back control — but have little chance of grabbing a 60-member, filibuster-proof majority.

While Gabbard has reservations about eliminating the Electoral College and the Senate’s filibuster, she’s on board with another controversial idea being pushed by some primary rivals – financial reparations for descendants of slaves.

“I’ve actually co-sponsored a bill – HR40 in the House of Representatives – that would put together a commission that would look at the damage that has occurred because of our country’s dark history with slavery and to figure out what is the best way to bring about those reparations,” she told Fox News. “I think we need to bring about reparations, it’s really a question of what is the right way and how.”

Gabbard was interviewed during a jam-packed three-day swing through New Hampshire, the state that holds the first primary in the race for the White House.

The Granite State was Sanders country in the 2016 Democratic primary. The independent senator from neighboring Vermont crushed Hillary Clinton in the state’s primary, launching him into a marathon battle with the eventual Democratic presidential nominee.

Asked how she could compete in New Hampshire for Sanders supporters, Gabbard quickly answered that “this is about something … much bigger than just one person.”

Source: Fox News Politics

President Trump abruptly announced Friday that he was withdrawing sanctions on North Korea, immediately after his own Treasury Department imposed them.

“It was announced today by the U.S. Treasury that additional large scale Sanctions would be added to those already existing Sanctions on North Korea. I have today ordered the withdrawal of those additional Sanctions!” Trump tweeted Friday afternoon.

This was an apparent reference to sanctions the Treasury Department had announced Thursday on Chinese shipping companies doing business with North Korea. Those sanctions prompted swift pushback from the Chinese and North Korea governments.

TRUMP ADMINISTRATION SLAPS NEW SANCTIONS ON IRAN

When asked about the president’s tweet, White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders said: “President Trump likes Chairman Kim and he doesn’t think these sanctions will be necessary.”

The Treasury Department did not immediately respond to Fox News’ request for comment.

The president’s unusual move comes after his second summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, held last month in Hanoi, Vietnam. Trump walked out of that summit after refusing to agree to the North’s demands of lifting all sanctions.

In what had been a move to ratchet up pressure further, the Treasury Department on Thursday had imposed the sanctions on two Chinese-based companies to highlight “the deceptive methods that the North Korean regime uses to circumvent international and U.S. sanctions, as well as the U.S. Government’s commitment to implement existing UN Security Council resolutions.”

“The United States and our like-minded partners remain committed to achieving the final, fully verified denuclearization of North Korea and believe that the full implementation of North Korea-related UN Security Council resolutions is crucial to a successful outcome,” said Treasury Secretary Steven T. Mnuchin said in a statement Thursday. “Treasury will continue to enforce our sanctions, and we are making it explicitly clear that shipping companies employing deceptive tactics to mask illicit trade with North Korea expose themselves to great risk.”

KIM JONG UN WILLING TO SIT DOWN WITH TRUMP AGAIN, NORTH KOREA STATE MEDIA SAYS

On Friday, the Chinese foreign ministry pushed back on the sanctions, saying that they “resolutely oppose any country imposing unilateral sanctions and long-armed jurisdiction over Chinese entities under its own domestic laws.”

“We have made solemn complaints with the U.S. on this matter, urging the U.S. to immediately stop such mistakes, so as not to affect the cooperation between the two sides on relevant issues,” the Chinese Foreign Ministry said, adding that any Chinese enterprises and individuals would be investigated according to China’s laws.

Fox News’ Kellianne Jones, Kristin Brown and David Nath contributed to this report. 

Source: Fox News Politics

The Democratic field of candidates have President Donald Trump running scared — or at least that’s what the director of communications for the Democratic National Committee believes.

“I think Donald Trump has a lot of thoughts about the Democratic Party because frankly, he’s scared about who he is going to potentially face,” Xochitl Hinojosa told “America’s Newsroom” Friday.

Hinojosa defended the ideas expressed by the Democratic Party’s candidates and accused the president of trying to instill “fear in the communities.”

“It’s okay to come forward with bold progressive ideas and have the voters decide who they want as the Democratic nominee,” Hinojosa told co-host Sandra Smith. “So, we’re going to see this process play out but we’re out there talking about the issues while Donald Trump is out there trying to instill fear in the communities.”

SEN. GILLIBRAND PROPOSES GIVING SOCIAL SECURITY TO ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS

President Donald Trump talks with reporters before boarding Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House, Friday, March 22, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

President Donald Trump talks with reporters before boarding Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House, Friday, March 22, 2019, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

She added: “There will be other issues we bring up during the primary and it’ll be up to other voters to decide whether or not they like those ideas.”

The DNC communications director said Democrats were focused on the issues of healthcare and the economy.

Hinojosa also downplayed presidential candidate Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand’s, D-N.Y., comments this week calling for the expansion of Social Security payments to potentially include people living in the country illegally.

“If you are in this country now, you must have the right to pay into Social Security, to pay your taxes, to pay into your local school system, and to have a pathway to citizenship. That must happen,” Gillibrand said.

FAR-LEFT MOVEON.ORG ASKS 2020 PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES TO SKIP PRO-ISRAEL AIPAC CONFERENCE

“We know that our immigration system is broken, I think Republicans can agree with us on that. But they believe our solution is a border wall and we believe it’s comprehensive immigration reform,” Hinojosa said.

Hinojosa also emphasized Democratic support of Israel even as many Democratic candidates declined invitations to attend the American Israel Public Affairs Committee’s annual Policy (AIPAC) conference next week.

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“I don’t speak for each of those candidates but I will say as a whole, as the Democratic Party we will never waver in our support for Israel,” Hinojosa said.

Source: Fox News Politics

George Conway fired another shot Friday at President Trump in their seemingly endless feud.

Conway, the husband of White House adviser Kellyanne Conway, again questioned Trump’s mental fitness for office before suggesting there is a sinister motive driving the president’s bid to win re-election in 2020.

“THINK about the fact that we don’t just have a mentally unstable president—but a president who thinks he needs to be re-elected to avoid being indicted. (At least in that one respect his thinking is clear),” Conway tweeted.

Conway was responding to a tweet from New York Times’ reporter Maggie Haberman speculating that some people close to the president believe that to be one of his motivations for running again.

KELLYANNE CONWAY CALLS HUSBAND’S ATTACKS ON TRUMP ‘UNUSUAL,’ THANKS PRESIDENT FOR DEFENDING HER

The Front Lawn of the White House with American Flag in Washington, DC.

The Front Lawn of the White House with American Flag in Washington, DC.

TRUMP GOES NUCLEAR ON KELLYANNE SPOUSE GEORGE CONWAY: ‘HUSBAND FROM HELL!’

Later in the morning, Conway fired off some other tweets questioning whether or not Trump has “narcissistic personality disorder.”

The tweets came after Kellyanne Conway herself weighed in on the feud between her husband and her boss. Kellyanne called her spouse’s criticism of her boss "unusual" while thanking Trump for defending her from what “he thinks is unfairness.”

“My husband has been very critical of the president publicly, which is unlike him because he’s usually a very private person,” she told Maria Bartiromo during an interview on Fox Business Network’s “Mornings with Maria."

KELLYANNE CONWAY’S HUSBAND RIPS TRUMP AGAIN, SAYS CONDITION GETTING WORSE

The interview was preceded by Trump calling George Conway a “stone cold LOSER & husband from hell!”

“George Conway, often referred to as Mr. Kellyanne Conway by those who know him, is VERY jealous of his wife’s success & angry that I, with her help, didn’t give him the job he so desperately wanted. I barely know him but just take a look, a stone cold LOSER & husband from hell!” Trump tweeted Wednesday morning.

In one of the more bizarre feuds of the Trump era, George Conway has repeatedly questioned the president’s mental health on social media, all while his wife continues to work at the White House. He responded to the latest salvo by tweeting: "You. Are. Nuts."

This is not the first time a Trump administration official has been put in an awkward spot due to the president’s disagreements with their spouse. In 2017, Transportation Secretary Elaine Chao was in a similar situation when Trump criticized her husband, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, for lack of action on health care.

GEORGE CONWAY RAMPS UP TRUMP ATTACKS AS KELLYANNE DEFENDS BOSS

"I stand by my man — both of them," she said at the time.

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Fox News’ Brooke Singman and Adam Shaw contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Former Navy SEAL-turned-politician Dan Crenshaw is taking aim at political correctness.

Rep. Crenshaw, R-Texas, said Friday that identity politics is a problem in America that will have dire consequences for the military and the country.

“It’s certainly a problem in America at-large. What is identity politics? It’s this temptation to divide us up into different groups. Whether that be based on race, gender, or some other category and then pit those groups against each other and compete for power accordingly,” Crenshaw said on “Fox & Friends.

DEMOCRATS TURN ON EACH OTHER USING IDENTITY POLITICS

“The way America should be is the only colors that matter are red, white, and blue. And that we compete according to our competency, that we compete according to a meritocracy which is really a fundamental element to the military. If you take that away from the military… the military will eventually fail and our country at-large will fail.”

Crenshaw was reacting to comments from retired U.S. Army Lt. Gen. Sean MacFarland who Monday called identity politics a “cancer” and said it was getting harder to get everybody “playing for the same team.”

The way America should be is the only colors that matter are red, white, and blue.

— Rep. Dan Crenshaw

REP. DAN CRENSHAW SEEN AS THE FUTURE OF THE GOP

"Is it getting harder in the U.S. military to assimilate everybody and get everybody on the same — playing for the same team? Yeah, it is. Identity politics is a cancer,” MacFarland said at an event hosted by the American Enterprise Institute.

Crenshaw agreed with MacFarland and was critical of America’s colleges for their role in promoting identity politics.

“It’s sort of this postmodern mentality… on college campuses especially, there’s this real temptation to tear down everything this country was built on to tear down these enlightenment ideals of equality,” he told "Fox & Friends."

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“They have different ideas of what equality means, right. They think quality means egalitarianism.  They think it means everybody should have the exact same thing and… that there’s injustices all around them.

"But the reality is that we’re supposed to compete in a free society as free individuals and part of that competition is a meritocracy and that’s what our country was founded on. And I think people are forgetting that.”

Source: Fox News Politics

The Democratic Socialists of America, whose membership ballooned after the 2016 candidacy of allied Sen. Bernie Sanders, announced its endorsement this week of the Vermont lawmaker in his second bid for the Democratic presidential nomination.

“Sanders is the only Democratic Socialist running for president in 2020, and the only socialist in American history with a serious chance of winning the presidency,” said the DSA in a press release. “Sanders’s platform — Green New Deal, Medicare for All, College for All, ending cash bail, strengthening unions, and a living wage — would transform American society by ending the worst forms of poverty and inequality while empowering workers to fight for even more.”

TOP 5 FAILED SOCIALIST PROMISES: FROM LENIN TO CHAVEZ 

While the endorsement comes as little surprise, some democratic socialists had raised concerns that Sanders is not socialist enough.

“Sanders 2016 revived the progressive left and turned DSA into the largest socialist organization in America in seventy years,” former Sanders campaign worker Dan La Botz wrote on the DSA website in opposition to a Sanders endorsement. “Flooded with young people angry at the Democratic Party, DSA became a radical, activist organization projecting the need for a total socialist transformation of America.”

“Sanders 2020 will not have the same effect,” La Botz wrote. “Bernie will not appear to be much different than other progressive Democrats and his campaign threatens to lead DSA deep into the Democratic Party.”

About a quarter of some 13,000 DSA members responding to the organization’s poll before the decision to back the senator said they did not support the endorsement of Sanders.

But other DSA followers, who have debated among themselves whether they should seek to gain influence within the Democratic Party or on their own under the socialist banner, see Sanders as their ticket to growth.

An apparent DSA member identified only as “Neal M.” wrote on the organization’s website: “DSA benefited hugely from being the only socialist organization to actively endorse Sanders in 2016. If we enthusiastically support Sanders in 2020, DSA could become a 100,000 member organization, with significantly greater capacity and resources.”

“The number one lesson we should learn from 2016 is that small socialist organizations must participate in the big movements that dominate national politics.”

Sanders is a self-described democratic socialist. He announced his Democratic presidential bid last month, saying his campaign is about “creating a government based on the principles of economic, social, racial and environmental justice.”

Sanders spoke to striking university workers in Los Angeles this week and complained about “a war being waged against the working people.”

The DSA puts its membership at more than 56,000 as of March. Its long-term mission is to run candidates as socialists, and not under the Democratic Party banner.

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks as he kicks off his second presidential campaign, Saturday, March 2, 2019, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Sanders pledged to fight for "economic justice, social justice, racial justice and environmental justice." (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)

Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., speaks as he kicks off his second presidential campaign, Saturday, March 2, 2019, in the Brooklyn borough of New York. Sanders pledged to fight for "economic justice, social justice, racial justice and environmental justice." (AP Photo/Craig Ruttle)

Ella Mahony of the DSA’s national political committee said in recent days that democratic socialists have a unique spotlight right now to further their anti-capitalist agenda and convert more Americans to socialism. Not backing Sanders, she said on the DSA website, would mean losing an opportunity to push their message on a national stage.

“The combination of the Sanders campaign and the teachers’ strike wave has made our job as socialists so much easier,” Mahony said. “Now, we can go into our campuses or workplaces and find people willing to identify not just as union activists or as socially conscious but as Democratic Socialists.”

Jon Torsch, center, wears a t-shirt promoting democratic socialism during a gathering of the Southern Maine Democratic Socialists of America at City Hall in Portland, Maine, Monday, July 16, 2018. On the ground in dozens of states, there is new evidence that democratic socialism is taking hold as a significant force in Democratic politics. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa)

Jon Torsch, center, wears a t-shirt promoting democratic socialism during a gathering of the Southern Maine Democratic Socialists of America at City Hall in Portland, Maine, Monday, July 16, 2018. On the ground in dozens of states, there is new evidence that democratic socialism is taking hold as a significant force in Democratic politics. (AP Photo/Charles Krupa) (Copyright 2018 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.)

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“It is our duty to take full advantage of this moment and run out the radicalizing processes happening in the formal political sphere, in labor, and in society as far as they can go, she added. “Whatever the details of his program may mean to us, to the rest of the world, the Bernie Sanders campaign will be a referendum on socialist politics in the United States.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Freshman Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y., compared President Trump to a worm during an interview on “Late Night with Seth Meyers” on Thursday — but you’d need your dictionary to know that.

The 29-year-old congresswoman used an obscure term to take a swipe at Trump toward the end of her appearance, when Meyers asked her about winning the second-place prize as a teen in her high school science competition.

AOC DEFENDS GREEN NEW DEAL, SAYS NARRATIVE BEING ‘MANIPULATED’ BY TRUMP, OTHER CRITICS

“Science was my first passion,” said Ocasio-Cortez. “I studied microbiology and the impacts of antioxidants on a model organism known as the C. elegan, which is of the nematode family.”

Meyers compared Ocasio-Cortez’s interest in science to that of Trump, interjecting “I think he did that, too.”

“Because he’s a nematode?” she retorted while the crowd roared in laughter, comparing the president to the roundworms found as parasites in animals and plants.

Ocasio-Cortez also vehemently defended her Green New Deal during her time on the show, claiming Trump and other critics are manipulating the narrative around her proposal for climate change reform.

“They’re trying to say that the Green New Deal is about what we have to give up, what we have to cut back on, when in fact the Green New Deal itself is a resolution to be more expansive,” Ocasio-Cortez said.

The massive climate change investment has been criticized for being too overreaching and too expensive.

The self-proclaimed democratic socialist became the youngest woman ever elected to Congress after defeating 10-term Democratic incumbent Joe Crowley in the primary and then winning in the November general election.

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The politician turned bartender is a leader of the Democratic Party’s progressive wing and has managed to gain endorsements for her Green New Deal bill from Democratic 2020 hopefuls.

Fox News’ Joseph A Wulfsohn contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

The Trump administration announced Friday that it is slapping new sanctions on more than two dozen Iranian individuals involved in the country’s nuclear and missile research programs, as Secretary of State Mike Pompeo denounced Iran’s growing influence.

The Treasury Department said the sanctions target 31 Iranian scientists, technicians and companies affiliated with Iran’s Organization for Defense Innovation and Research, which is known to have been at the forefront of Iran’s nuclear weapons program.

“Individuals working for Iran’s proliferation-related programs—including scientists, procurement agents, and technical experts—should be aware of the reputational and financial risk they expose themselves to by working for Iran’s nuclear program,” the State Department said in a statement on Friday.

The administration’s move to impose sanctions is unusual, because they are not focused on what the individuals are currently doing, but rather because of their past work in nuclear weapons development, and the potential that they could attempt to restart the nuclear activities.

The officials targeted continue to work in Iran’s defense sector and are part of a core group of experts who could reinstate the nuclear program. The sanctions cover 14 people, including the head of the organization, and 17 subsidiary operations.

The sanctions freeze assets that those targeted may have in the U.S., and bar any Americans from any transactions with them. Officials said the move will make those targeted “radioactive internationally,” and would make anyone who does business with them subject to further U.S. sanctions.

Iran pledged not to continue work on atomic weapons under the 2015 nuclear deal. The United Nations’ nuclear watchdog has said that Iran continues to comply with that agreement, which the U.S. pulled out of last year, calling it fatally flawed.

The Trump administration has re-imposed U.S. sanctions that were eased under the terms of the agreement, and it continuing to impose new ones as part of a pressure campaign to force Iran to agree to renegotiate the agreement.

The announcement came as Pompeo was in Beirut warning Lebanese officials to curb the influence of the Iran-backed Hezbollah movement. He says Hezbollah is a terrorist organization and should not be allowed to set policies or wield power despite its presence in Lebanon’s parliament and government.

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

Source: Fox News Politics

Just nine days before the FBI applied for a Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act (FISA) warrant to surveil a top Trump campaign aide, bureau officials were battling with a senior Justice Department official who had "continued concerns" about the "possible bias" of a source pivotal to the application, according to internal text messages obtained by Fox News.

The 2016 messages, sent between former FBI lawyer Lisa Page and then-FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe, also reveal that bureau brass circulated at least two anti-Trump blog articles, including a Lawfare blog post sent shortly after Election Day that called Trump possibly "among the major threats to the security of the country."

COMEY ADMITS FBI ’DIDN’T KNOW WHETHER WE HAD ANYTHING’ ON TRUMP WHEN HE WAS FIRED AS FBI DIRECTOR IN 2017

Another article, sent by Page in July 2016 as the FBI’s counterintelligence probe into Russian election interference was kicking off, flatly called Trump a "useful idiot" for Russian President Vladimir Putin. Page told McCabe that then-FBI Director James Comey had "surely" read that piece. Both articles were authored in whole or part by Benjamin Wittes, a Comey friend.

Further, the texts show that on Sept. 12, 2016, Page forwarded to McCabe some "unsolicited comments" calling then-House GOP Oversight Committee Chairman Trey Gowdy a "total d–k." Gowdy, at the time, was grilling FBI congressional affairs director Jason Herring at a hearing on the FBI’s handling of the Clinton email investigation.

But perhaps the most significant Page-McCabe communications made plain the DOJ’s worries that the FISA application to surveil Trump aide Carter Page was based on a potentially biased source — and underscored the FBI’s desire to press on.

Fox News is told the texts were connected to the ultimately successful Page application, which relied in part on information from British ex-spy Christopher Steele – whose anti-Trump views are now well-documented – and cited Page’s suspected Russia ties. In its warrant application, the FBI assured the FISA court on numerous occasions that other sources independently corroborated Steele’s claims but did not clearly state that Steele worked for a firm hired by Hillary Clinton’s campaign.

One-time advisor to President Trump Carter Page addresses the audience during a presentation in Moscow, Russia, December 12, 2016. REUTERS/Sergei Karpukhin - RC165B503FF0

One-time advisor to President Trump Carter Page addresses the audience during a presentation in Moscow, Russia, December 12, 2016. REUTERS/Sergei Karpukhin – RC165B503FF0

Carter Page has not been charged with any wrongdoing despite more than a year of federal surveillance, and he has since sued numerous actors — including the Democratic National Committee (DNC) — for defamation related to claims that he worked with Russia.

"OI [Office of Intelligence] now has a robust explanation re any possible bias of the chs [confidential human source] in the package," Lisa Page wrote to McCabe on Oct. 12, 2016. "Don’t know what the holdup is now, other than Stu’s continued concerns."

It’s unclear whether the confidential source in question was Steele or another individual. "Stu" was an apparent reference to Stuart Evans, then the DOJ’s National Security Division deputy assistant attorney general. In one previously unearthed and since-unredacted text message, former FBI Special Agent Peter Strzok texted Lisa Page that he was "Currently fighting with Stu for this FISA" in late 2016.

(In text messages above, "incoming" refers to texts from McCabe; "outgoing" refers to texts from Page)

"Strong operational need to have in place before Monday if at all possible, which means to ct tomorrow," Page added. "I communicated you and boss’s green light to Stu earlier, and just sent an email to Stu asking where things stood. This might take a high-level push. Will keep you posted."

STRZOK: DOJ REACHED SECRET AGREEMENT WITH CLINTON LAWYERS TO BLOCK FBI ACCESS TO CLINTON FOUNDATION EMAILS

Minutes later, Page sent another urgent text to McCabe: "If I have not heard back from Stu in an hour, I will invoke your name to say you want to know where things are, so long as that is okay with you."

On Oct. 14, 2016, Page again wrote to McCabe, this time concerning a meeting with the White House.

“Just called," Page said to McCabe. "Apparently the DAG [Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates] now wants to be there, and WH wants DOJ to host.  So we are setting that up now.  … We will very much need to get Cohen’s view before we meet with her.  Better, have him weigh in with her before the meeting. We need to speak with one voice, if that is in fact the case.” ("Cohen" is likely then-Deputy CIA Director David Cohen.)

McCabe responded within the hour: "Thanks. I will reach out to David." On Oct. 19, Page wrote to McCabe that the "meeting with WH counsel is finally set up."

Neither Lisa Page nor McCabe responded to Fox News’ inquiries as to whether the meeting was designed to brief the White House on the FISA application or some other matter. Page and McCabe also did not reply to Fox News’ inquiries about the DOJ’s concerns over the FISA application, or dispute that the texts related to the Carter Page warrant application. Fox News has also reached out to the FBI and DOJ for comment.

Former FBI lawyer Lisa Page arrives for a closed door interview with the House Judiciary and House Oversight and Government Reform committees, Friday, July 13, 2018, on Capitol Hill in Washington.

Former FBI lawyer Lisa Page arrives for a closed door interview with the House Judiciary and House Oversight and Government Reform committees, Friday, July 13, 2018, on Capitol Hill in Washington. (Associated Press)

The FISA application eventually filed by the FBI on Oct. 21, 2016 stated, "The F.B.I. believes [Carter] Page has been the subject of targeted recruitment by the Russian government."

The FBI went on to allege that Carter Page "has established relationships with Russian government officials, including Russian intelligence officers," and that the FBI believed "the Russian government’s efforts are being coordinated with [Carter] Page and perhaps other individuals associated with” Trump’s campaign. Page, the FBI told the FISA court, “has been collaborating and conspiring with the Russian government.”

Source: Fox News Politics

2020 candidate and Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren had a tough time Thursday describing what direction the Democratic Party should be heading in for the next presidential election.

Appearing on MSNBC, Warren dismissed the notion by critics that she was “anti-capitalist” for going after Wall Street, saying she “believes” in markets but stressed that “rules” are needed to oversee them and a “level playing field” for consumers.

BETO O’ROURKE DOES NOT SUPPORT WARREN’S BIG TECH BREAKUP PLAN

MSNBC host Ali Velshi noted how socialism was being embraced by some in her party, pointing to self-described democratic socialist Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and confronted the 2020 candidate about the direction of Democrats.

“So what do you say privately — pretend that we’re not on TV, about people who worry about the direction in which the Democratic Party may be going?” Velshi asked. “Some of the party wants it to be more liberal and others want the candidates to be more moderate.”

Warren didn’t respond directly to the question, putting emphasis on the “grassroots” of the party.

ELIZABETH WARREN PITCHES POLICIES TOTALING $100 TRILLION AT TOWN HALL: ESTIMATES

“Let me give you a different way of looking at it; I want our party to be more grassroots. I want our party to be more connected all across this country. And I’ll tell you how I look at it: I look at that in terms of money,” Warren told Velshi. “I don’t take PAC money of any kind. I don’t take Washington lobbyist money of any kind. And I’ve made the decision that I’m going to spend my time with grassroots all around this country trying to build a movement. Now, that’s a different way to try to power a campaign, to power a presidential campaign.”

“I think as a Democratic Party, we have this extraordinary opportunity during a primary to actually make our case to people at the grassroots, to engage them, and to revitalize our democracy,” Warren continued. “This shouldn’t just be about going to places where we can scoop lots of money and then run lots of TV ads, this should be about building the on-the-ground movement that’s gonna help us win in 2020, that’s gonna help us win not just the White House but Congress, the state houses, the governor’s mansions, and that’s gonna help us have the power to be able to start making real changes come January 2021.”

Source: Fox News Politics

President Trump accused House Democrats on Friday of “wasting everyone’s time” with their numerous investigations into his administration, businesses and campaign, calling them a “continuation of the same nonsense.”

Those investigations have ramped up as Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation is widely expected to be winding down. As he departed the White House on Friday for Mar-a-Lago, the president said: “It’s just a continuation of the same witch hunt. They know it, and behind closed doors, they laugh at it.”

WHITE HOUSE REJECTS HOUSE DEMS’ REQUEST FOR DOCUMENTS ON TRUMP-PUTIN TALKS

He continued, “It’s just a continuation of the same nonsense.”

The president said Democrats “ought to go to work” and “do infrastructure” and “get a lot of other things done instead of wasting people’s time.”

The president’s comments come amid mounting speculation that Mueller’s report will be transmitted soon to Attorney General William Barr. Barr will ultimately decide what, if anything, in the report can be made public.

“It’s going to be very interesting,” Trump said when asked about the Mueller report. “We’ll see what happens. There was no collusion, no obstruction.”

TOP DEM’S TRUMP PROBE TARGETS MISS DEADLINE IN SWEEPING DOCUMENT REQUEST

He added: “It’s all a big hoax. Everyone knows it. I know the Attorney General—he is highly respected—ultimately will make a decision.”

No matter when and how the investigation ends, House Democrats are aggressively ramping up on their own Trump-related investigations that will include a network of committee probes and high-profile hearings that are likely to last well into the 2020 election year.

Trump’s comments also come after the White House on Thursday rejected a call by House Democrats for documents relating to the private conversations between the U.S. president and Russian President Vladimir Putin.

White House Counsel Pat Cipollone penned a letter to House Intelligence Chairman Adam Schiff, D-Calif., Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Eliot Engel, D-N.Y., and Oversight Committee Chairman Elijah Cummings, D-Md., on Thursday, claiming that there is “no legal authority” for another branch of government to “force the president to disclose diplomatic communications with foreign leaders.”

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., is also leading an investigation into “alleged obstruction of justice, public corruption, and other abuses of power by President Trump,” which he announced earlier this month. Nadler requested documents and records from 81 individuals and entities connected, in some way, to the president. Thus far, only a fraction of those targeted in the probe have responded or complied with the document requests by the Nadler-imposed deadline of March 18.

Fox News’ Andrew O’Reilly contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

In some of his most revealing comments on why he decided against running for president, moderate former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg cited his age — but also took aim at the progressive wing of the Democratic Party.

"To start a four-year job, or maybe an eight-year job, at age 79 may not be the smartest thing to do. But if I think if I thought I could win, I would have,” the 77-year-old billionaire media mogul explained.

SCHULTZ SAYS NO ROOM FOR CENTRISTS IN EITHER MAJOR PARTY

“I just couldn’t see a path to where I could get the nomination,” Bloomberg said Thursday while speaking at the Bermuda Executive Forum in New York City. “It’s just not going to happen on a national level for somebody like me starting where I am unless I was willing to change all my views and go on what CNN called ‘an apology tour.’”

While he’s poured millions of his own money into combating climate change and battling gun violence, the Democrat turned Republican turned independent who last year re-registered as a Democrat suggested that he was simply more moderate than the ever-growing field of 2020 Democratic presidential contenders, many of whom are increasingly moving to the left.

Pointing to 76-year-old former Vice President Joe Biden, who’s likely to jump into the White House race next month, Bloomberg said, "Joe Biden went out and apologized for being male, over 50, white.”

“He apologized for the one piece of legislation which is actually a pretty good anti-crime bill, which if the liberals ever read it, most of the things they like would be in that bill. They should have loved that. But they didn’t even bother to read it. You’re anti-crime, you must be anti-populist,” Bloomberg added as he took a shot at progressives.

IT’S BIDEN, SANDERS, HARRIS, AND O’ROURKE IN 2020 POLL

And he also jabbed at former Rep. Beto O’Rourke of Texas, who last week declared his candidacy for the Democratic nomination and quickly raised an eye-popping $6.1 million in his first 24 hours as a candidate.

"And so everybody else, Beto, whatever his name is, he’s apologized for being born,” said Bloomberg, which brought laughter from the audience. “I mean, I don’t mean to be unkind. And a lot of people love him and say he’s a smart guy, and some day if he wins I’d certainly support him."

Bloomberg seriously considered launching a presidential bid, and earlier this year he made campaign-style swings through the early voting primary and caucus states. But he announced on March 5 that he would not run for the White House.

Source: Fox News Politics

In some of his most revealing comments on why he decided against running for president, moderate former New York City Mayor Mike Bloomberg cited his age — but also took aim at the progressive wing of the Democratic Party.

"To start a four-year job, or maybe an eight-year job, at age 79 may not be the smartest thing to do. But if I think if I thought I could win, I would have,” the 77-year-old billionaire media mogul explained.

SCHULTZ SAYS NO ROOM FOR CENTRISTS IN EITHER MAJOR PARTY

“I just couldn’t see a path to where I could get the nomination,” Bloomberg said Thursday while speaking at the Bermuda Executive Forum in New York City. “It’s just not going to happen on a national level for somebody like me starting where I am unless I was willing to change all my views and go on what CNN called ‘an apology tour.’”

While he’s poured millions of his own money into combating climate change and battling gun violence, the Democrat turned Republican turned independent who last year re-registered as a Democrat suggested that he was simply more moderate than the ever-growing field of 2020 Democratic presidential contenders, many of whom are increasingly moving to the left.

Pointing to 76-year-old former Vice President Joe Biden, who’s likely to jump into the White House race next month, Bloomberg said, "Joe Biden went out and apologized for being male, over 50, white.”

“He apologized for the one piece of legislation which is actually a pretty good anti-crime bill, which if the liberals ever read it, most of the things they like would be in that bill. They should have loved that. But they didn’t even bother to read it. You’re anti-crime, you must be anti-populist,” Bloomberg added as he took a shot at progressives.

IT’S BIDEN, SANDERS, HARRIS, AND O’ROURKE IN 2020 POLL

And he also jabbed at former Rep. Beto O’Rourke of Texas, who last week declared his candidacy for the Democratic nomination and quickly raised an eye-popping $6.1 million in his first 24 hours as a candidate.

"And so everybody else, Beto, whatever his name is, he’s apologized for being born,” said Bloomberg, which brought laughter from the audience. “I mean, I don’t mean to be unkind. And a lot of people love him and say he’s a smart guy, and some day if he wins I’d certainly support him."

Bloomberg seriously considered launching a presidential bid, and earlier this year he made campaign-style swings through the early voting primary and caucus states. But he announced on March 5 that he would not run for the White House.

Source: Fox News Politics

John McCain’s youngest daughter made a rare public statement hitting back at President Trump in the wake of his attacks on the late Arizona senator.

Bridget McCain tweeted at the president, speaking out on his recent comments about her father who died in August of brain cancer.

“Everyone doesn’t have to agree with my dad or like him, but I do ask you to be decent and respectful,” she wrote. “If you can’t do those two things, be mindful. We only said goodbye to him 7 months ago.”

In a second tweet, McCain delivered a stronger rebuke to Trump and referred to him as a “child.”

TRUMP SAYS JOHN MCCAIN ‘WAS HORRIBLE, WHAT HE DID WITH REPEAL AND REPLACE’

Bridget and Meghan McCain console each other after their father's death.

Bridget and Meghan McCain console each other after their father’s death. (Getty Images)

“Even if you were invited to my dad’s funeral, you would have only wanted to be there for the credit and not for any condolences. Unfortunately, you could not be counted on to be courteous, as you are a child in the most important role the world knows,” she wrote.

A few hours later, McCain’s sister, “The View” host Meghan McCain discussed her sister’s comments on the program.

“I think it’s very brave of her,” Meghan McCain said of her sister. “She’s very young and she does not speak publicly.”

The host went on to say that she doesn’t “expect decency and compassion from the Trump family.”

"I do want to thank the American public for all the decency and compassion they have given us,” she continued.

TRUMP RIPS INTO MCCAIN’S LEGACY, SUPPORT FOR IRAQ WAR DURING SPEECH TO OHIO PLANT WORKERS

Trump’s most recent attack on the late Republican senator came Wednesday when he said he gave the longtime lawmaker “the kind of funeral he wanted” and “didn’t get a thank you.”

At an event in Ohio, Trump repeated his complaint that McCain voted against his legislation to repeal former President Barack Obama’s health care law and argued the Vietnam War hero was not supportive of military veterans.

Trump said "I’ve never liked him much," adding that he "probably never will."

On Thursday, Trump told Fox Business Network’s “Morning with Maria” that he was “not a fan of John McCain, and that’s fine.”

Fox News’ Samuel Chamberlain and the Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

President Trump, in an extensive interview with Fox Business Network’s Maria Bartiromo, accused Democrats embracing ideas like court-packing and the Green New Deal of becoming "radicalized" — while voicing confidence as he sized up the ever-expanding field of potential 2020 opponents.

The president mocked the Democratic contenders for “saying a lot of weird things,” calling the Green New Deal “the most preposterous thing” and blasting Beto O’Rourke’s idea of taking down sections of border wall.

TRUMP AMASSING HUGE WAR CHEST FOR 2020

But asked which candidate in the massive field he’d truly like to run against in 2020, Trump threw out a few names:

"I mean, I’d love to have [Joe] Biden. I’d love to have Bernie [Sanders], I’d love to have Beto," he said, adding: "I mean, Beto seems to be the one the press has chosen. The press seems to have chosen Beto. … When I watch Beto, I say we could dream about that."

The comments amount to an early read from the president on which candidates he’d delight in tarring on the campaign trail, with the field growing every week and increasingly running to the left on issues ranging from immigration to taxes.

In the same interview, Trump alleged "the Democrats actually are becoming a far left party, I mean, they’re becoming a radical party. You look at what they want to do with the Supreme Court. You look at what they want to do with the voting age. Where did that come all of the sudden? The voting age at 16 — they’re becoming radical. They are radicalized."

He was referring to calls by Democrats, including 2020 candidates, to stack more justices onto the Supreme Court and lower the voting age to 16.

Trump discussed a range of other hot-button issues, including the economy and his controversial criticism of the late Sen. John McCain that has led to rebukes from his own party.

Bartiromo began by pointing out that while the U.S. economy has grown under Trump’s administration, the rest of the world seems to be slowing. Asked how he would keep the momentum, Trump said trade deals made during his presidency will continue to be enforced and expressed high hopes for an impending trade deal with China. He added that that tariffs on Chinese imports have already brought in billions in additional revenue.

US, CHINA CLOSE IN ON TRADE DEAL THAT WOULD REMOVE SANCTIONS ON CHINESE PRODUCTS: REPORT

“[I]f you look at technology and the first $50 billion of goods, we want to keep that … because we need that.”

Trump also lavished praised on the U.S.-Mexico-Canada Agreement (USMCA) as a remedy to the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) — or as he frequently calls it: “one of the worst deals I’ve ever seen.” He then blasted the European Union for what he regarded as a double standard. Countries like Germany, he said, are sending their cars virtually untaxed, while not accepting U.S.-made cars in return.

It’s hard to believe I won. If you think about it, I had Facebook, Google, Twitter, everybody against me … the media is almost totally against me.

— President Donald Trump

“The numbers are just smaller by a lot — but you know, we lost, over the course of the last five, six, seven years, $150 billion a year with European Union,” Trump said. “They don’t take our product. They tax us tremendously. They tariff us tremendously. Almost every country has taken advantage of the United States — and we’re straightening it out.”

Trump appeared unconcerned that slapping tariffs on auto imports might disrupt the global economy, insisting that the “end game” is for companies to “build their plants in the United States” with no tariffs.

CNN PANEL MOCKS DEVIN NUNES, CONSERVATIVES’ CLAIMS THAT TWITTER IS SHADOW-BANNING THEM AS ‘CONSPIRATORIAL LIE’

The interview touched on social media’s alleged censorship of conservative voices, like Rep. Devin Nunes, who earlier this week opened a lawsuit against Twitter. Asked what regulation he would like to see imposed on social media companies, Trump said he hates “the concept of regulation on media,” but claimed apparent “collusion between Democrats.”

“It’s hard to believe I won,” he said. “If you think about it, I had Facebook, Google, Twitter, everybody against me.  I have — the media is almost totally against me.  And yet I won. 306 to 223; people can’t even believe it. I won. Because I’m able to get the word out through my social media, because I have great social media — but I’ll tell you, it’s much tougher than it should be.”

Though not having the same inclination as Sen. Elizabeth Warren to break up these tech companies, he criticized them for being stricter on conservatives than Democrats – who, he added, are becoming increasingly radicalized.

ARNOLD SCHWARZENEGGER CALLS DONALD TRUMP’S ATTACKS ON JOHN MCCAIN ‘UNACCEPTABLE,’ MOCKS PRESIDENT’S PHYSIQUE

Trump also addressed the heat he’s taken this week for criticizing McCain — who died last August – during a speech to workers at an Army tank plant in Ohio, saying: “I never liked him much. I really probably never will."

Trump blasted McCain for voting against a bid to roll back ObamaCare, being involved in handing over the so-called Steele Dossier to the FBI, and supporting military intervention in Iraq.

“[W]hat he did to the Republican Party and to the nation and to sick people that could have had great health care, it’s not good. So I’m not a fan of John McCain, and that’s fine,” Trump said.

With the long-awaited Mueller report rumored to be wrapping up soon, Trump dismissed the notion that anything substantial would be revealed regarding supposed Russia collusion in the 2016 presidential election.

“If you look over the past two years, how many breaking news stories was there about me that turned out to be nonexistent?  So many of them,” he said.

Despite battling on multiple fronts, Trump was still optimistic that common ground could be reached with Democrats — who he suggested appear more invested in infrastructure than Republicans.

“I like, frankly, owning our own roads, owning our bridges. I don’t like selling them to other countries,” he said, adding: “I think it’s very feasible because I think [Democrats] want to do it. I mean, Nancy Pelosi told me very strongly they want to do infrastructure.”

HUNDREDS OF ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS RELEASED INTO US AMID OVERCROWDING AT DETENTION FACILITIES

He then shifted gears to immigration, which he derided as a “total disaster in this country.”

“We have laws that are so bad; people pouring in,” Trump said. He lavished praise on immigration officials but said that their working conditions would be remarkably improved with a wall – which he insisted he was committed to building.

“We’re building the wall and it’s going up fast, big, strong, looks good, not the horrible thing that they were building before I got here.  We’re building the wall now.  We’re going to have a lot of wall built pretty soon.  But if you don’t have that, you can’t have border security,” he said.

Source: Fox News Politics

President Trump, often criticized for his stance toward women, employs more women as senior advisers than former presidents Barack Obama, George W. Bush, and Bill Clinton did at the similar points in their presidencies.

Given the relative paucity of female senior presidential advisers prior to Clinton, Trump’s employment of women as key advisers at this early point in his presidency may be higher than any other president’s in history

At the beginning of the third year of his first term as president, Trump has seven female top advisers, as compared to five for Obama, three for Bush, and five for Clinton at that point. He had eight as of December 2018, when United Nations Ambassador Nikki Haley departed the administration.

The top advisers are White House press secretary Sarah Sanders, counselor to the president Kellyanne Conway; CIA Director Gina Haspel, Secretary of Homeland Security Kirstjen Nielsen, senior adviser Ivanka Trump, Director of Legislative Affairs Shahira Knight, and Director of Strategic Communications Mercedes Schlapp.

Trump reportedly will also nominate more women to powerful positions soon, such as U.S. Ambassador to Canada Kelly Craft for U.N. ambassador and U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia Jessie Liu for associate attorney general, a key post currently held by Rod Rosenstein.

Click for more from Washington Examiner. 

Source: Fox News Politics

The Democrats’ dramatic, leftward turn is proof of how “sick” the party has become and why it is “the greatest threat to the constitution,” according to Fox News Channel’s Mark Levin.

Levin, a best-selling author whose daily broadcast is heard by more than 10 million listeners on nearly 400 stations and who also hosts Fox News’ “Life, Liberty & Levin,” delivered the explosive diagnosis during “Hannity” on Thursday night.

After Sean Hannity mentioned some of the recent pushes by Dems to scrap the Electoral College and stack the Supreme Court, Levin launched his attack.

“The greatest threat to our constitution and economic system isn’t any foreign power, it’s the Democrat party,” he said. “It’s the leftists within the Democrat party, because they use our liberty and our constitution to destroy our liberty and our constitution, and they’re very good at it. Look at this, you named some of them.”

CONSERVATIVE HOST MARK LEVIN CLAIMS ‘SILENT COUP’ WARNING JUSTIFIED BY McCABE, ROSENSTEIN REPORTS

Levin then turned his attention to Democratic presidential candidates who declined invitations to a key pro-Israel policy group’s conference next week, an annual meeting that has usually been a must-attend meeting for members of both parties, in what some see as a further sign of the party’s growing disdain for the Jewish state.

Sens. Bernie Sanders, Kamala Harris, Elizabeth Warren, former Rep. Beto O’Rourke and many others have said they won’t be attending the American Israel Public Affairs Committee’s annual Policy (AIPAC) conference, a move that coincides with a moneyed progressive advocacy group’s call to boycott the event.

“This is a sick party,” Levin said. “These are sick people running for president of the United States. There is no other explanation for this.”

TOP 2020 DEMOCRATS SNUB AIPAC CONFERENCE WITH LITTLE OR NO EXPLANATION

MoveOn.org, a group that spent around $3.5 million in the 2018 midterm elections, called on the 2020 Democratic candidates to skip the conference, even though in the past all presidential candidates viewed the AIPAC conference as a crucial campaign stop.

The three-day conference this year will be headlined by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Vice President Mike Pence, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, and Democratic House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer.

So far no Democrats who are officially running for president have issued a statement confirming their attendance at the conference.

Sanders’ aide Josh Orton told media outlets that the leading candidate among the Democrats won’t be attending because “he’s concerned about the platform AIPAC is providing for leaders who have expressed bigotry and oppose a two-state solution” in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

2020 DEMS TAKE AIM AT FILIBUSTER, SAY SENATE TRADITION SHOULD ‘GO THE WAY OF HISTORY’

Other candidates such as Kamala Harris or Elizabeth Warren, meanwhile, confirmed that they don’t plan to attend the conference, but provided no explanation for their decisions.

Harris addressed the AIPAC in 2017, saying it was “an honor” to speak there and praised the group’s leadership. “And I’m proud to say and be among the many voices represented here, the California delegation is the largest and hopefully the loudest. There you go,” she said.

O’Rourke criticized the embattled Israeli prime minister during a campaign stop earlier this week, saying Netanyahu “has openly sided with racists.”

“Right now, we don’t have the best-negotiating partners on either side. We have a prime minister in Israel who has openly sided with racists,” he charged.

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Other Democratic candidates who won’t be attending the conference are Julian Castro, Pete Buttigieg, and Rep. John Delaney, though the latter politician said he’s unable to attend due to scheduling conflicts.

AIPAC is a non-partisan organization that seeks to foster the relationship between the U.S. and Israel. The group, despite misleading portrayals on the far-left, supports a two-state solution and doesn’t endorse nor donate to political candidates.

Fox News’ Lukas Mikelionis contributed to this report

Source: Fox News Politics

Democratic presidential candidate Pete Buttigieg has branded the Trump administration “the porn star presidency” but once questioned whether Bill Clinton should have been impeached for his scandals, calling a sexual harassment lawsuit against Clinton “frivolous” and “instigated by his opponents.”

Buttigieg, a millennial Indiana town mayor and the rising star of the Democratic presidential primary who already has drawn comparisons to former President Barack Obama, is expected to appear at the party’s debates after getting donations from 65,000 donors.

Earlier this month Buttigieg received media coverage after he blasted Vice President Mike Pence, saying Pence became a “cheerleader for the porn star presidency” and questioning whether Pence “stopped believing in scripture” and started to believe in Trump.

PETE BUTTIGIEG SLAMS PENCE FOR WORK WITH TRUMP, ASKS HOW HE ‘BECAME A CHEERLEADER FOR THE PORN STAR PRESIDENCY’

But during his days as a columnist for a Harvard University student paper, Buttgieg urged Americans to ignore presidential scandals involving “sexual excitement” and went great lengths to defend Clinton.

“And, in a formative moment for us all, the nation’s political life ground to a halt while President Clinton was impeached for having obfuscated about his sexual activities to a lawyer in a frivolous sexual harassment suit instigated by his opponents,” Buttgieg wrote in a 2004 Harvard Crimson column.

"… President Clinton was impeached for having obfuscated about his sexual activities to a lawyer in a frivolous sexual harassment suit instigated by his opponents."

— Pete Buttigieg

He refers to a sexual harassment lawsuit brought by Paula Jones, then a government employee in Arkansas, who claimed that Clinton, then-governor of Arkansas, propositioned her for sex.

Clinton ended up paying Jones $850,000 in an out-of-court settlement so she drops her sexual harassment charges against him.

In an email to Fox News, Buttgieg’s spokeswoman, Elisabeth Smith, didn’t address the content of the columns and said that “even in college, Pete understood the moral hypocrisy of the far right and politicians like Mike Pence. That’s the point he made in 2004 and it’s the point that he made regarding Mike Pence’s support for Donald Trump.”

PETE BUTTIGIEG DEFENDS HIS EXPERIENCE, SAYS 2020 CALLS FOR CANDIDATE WITH ‘COMPLETELY DIFFERENT’ BACKGROUND

The 2020 candidate went on to write in 2004 that Republican scandals, unlike Democrats, are “devoid of sexual excitement” and instead “packed with violence” – giving the example of the Iran-Contra controversy.

Buttgieg, who after Harvard became a Rhodes scholar and later served a tour in Afghanistan in 2014, said that both the Left and Americans should pay less attention to sexual scandals.

“The Left needs to hope for — and, if possible, help — Americans to acknowledge that what happens in the war room (and, for that matter, the board room) is more important than what happens in the bedroom,” he wrote.

This wasn’t the only time Buttgieg questioned whether Democrats should have ostracized Clinton immediately after the impeachment. In a 2003 column, he compared Clinton’s behavior to former Rep. Dan Burton’s conspiracy theories surrounding the death of a White House staffer.

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“If Burton could be taken seriously after his watermelon episode, are we really sure the Democrats had no choice but to drop Bill Clinton like a political hot potato rather than use him in the 2000 campaign?” Buttgieg asked.

Source: Fox News Politics

Several Democratic presidential candidates are declining invitations to a key pro-Israel policy group’s conference next week, an annual meeting that has usually been a must-attend meeting for members of both parties, in what some see as a further sign of the party’s growing disdain for the Jewish state.

Sens. Bernie Sanders, Kamala Harris, Elizabeth Warren, former Rep. Beto O’Rourke and many others have said they won’t be attending the American Israel Public Affairs Committee’s annual Policy (AIPAC) conference, a move that coincides with a moneyed progressive advocacy group’s call to boycott the event.

MoveOn.org, a group that spent around $3.5 million in the 2018 midterm elections, called on the 2020 Democratic candidates to skip the conference, even though in the past all presidential candidates viewed the AIPAC conference as a crucial campaign stop.

FAR-LEFT MOVEON.ORG ASKS 2020 PRESIDENTIAL CANDIDATES TO SKIP PRO-ISRAEL AIPAC CONFERENCE

The three-day conference this year will be headlined by Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, Vice President Mike Pence, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, Secretary of State Mike Pompeo, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio, and Democratic House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer.

So far no Democrats who are officially running for president have issued a statement confirming their attendance at the conference.

Sanders’ aide Josh Orton told media outlets that the leading candidate among the Democrats won’t be attending because “he’s concerned about the platform AIPAC is providing for leaders who have expressed bigotry and oppose a two-state solution” in the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

Other candidates such as Kamala Harris or Elizabeth Warren, meanwhile, confirmed that they don’t plan to attend the conference, but provided no explanation for their decisions.

Harris addressed the AIPAC in 2017, saying it was “an honor” to speak there and praised the group’s leadership. “And I’m proud to say and be among the many voices represented here, the California delegation is the largest and hopefully the loudest. There you go,” she said.

TRUMP’S SUPPORT FOR ISRAEL’S SOVEREIGNTY OVER GOLAN HEIGHTS EXPECTED TO MAKE WAVES AT UN

O’Rourke criticized the embattled Israeli prime minister during a campaign stop earlier this week, saying Netanyahu “has openly sided with racists.”

“Right now, we don’t have the best negotiating partners on either side. We have a prime minister in Israel who has openly sided with racists,” he charged.

Other Democratic candidates who won’t be attending the conference are Julian Castro, Pete Buttigieg, and Rep. John Delaney, though the latter politician said he’s unable to attend due to scheduling conflicts.

AIPAC is a non-partisan organization that seeks to foster the relationship between the U.S. and Israel. The group, despite misleading portrayals on the far-left, supports a two-state solution and doesn’t endorse nor donate to political candidates.

Earlier this year, Democrats came to reckon with the split of views in the party after Minnesota Rep. Ilhan Omar prompted charges of anti-Semitism after she accused AIPAC of paying politicians to support Israel.

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Pelosi called on Omar to apologize for the use of “anti-Semitic tropes and prejudicial accusations about Israel’s supporters.” In response, Omar promised Pelosi, fellow lawmakers and voters that she is “listening and learning, but standing strong.”

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

New Mexico’s Democratic secretary of state on Thursday rejected a petition targeting the repeal of the state’s new measure to expand its background check requirement for gun sales.

Secretary of State Maggie Toulouse Oliver denied the state’s House Republicans’ call for a statewide referendum on Senate Bill 8 through a rarely used provision of the state constitution, the Santa Fe New Mexican reported.

NEW MEXICO COUNTY BECOMES ‘SECOND AMENDMENT SANCTUARY’ IN PROTEST OF GUN CONTROL LEGISLATION

Republicans cited from the state constitution that “the people reserve the power to disapprove, suspend and annul any law enacted by the Legislature.” But Toulouse Oliver said that exceptions were allowed on laws regarding “public peace, health, and safety,” according to the New Mexican.

New Mexico Secretary of State Maggie Toulouse Oliver denied the state’s House Republicans’ call for a statewide referendum on a new gun-control law. (State government website)

New Mexico Secretary of State Maggie Toulouse Oliver denied the state’s House Republicans’ call for a statewide referendum on a new gun-control law. (State government website)

The legislation, which Democratic Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham signed into law March 8, requires background checks for nearly all gun sales, including when buying from private citizens, the Albuquerque Journal reported. The measure is set to go into effect in July. State law already required licensed dealers to conduct the checks.

NORTH CAROLINA COUNTY PASSES SYMBOLIC RESOLUTION, DECLARING ITSELF A ‘GUN SANCTUARY’

State Republicans contended that voters have the right to have their voices heard on the law, and were considering legal action.

“To say they don’t have the right to vote on this, to voice their opinion, is not how we’re supposed to operate,” House Minority Leader James Townsend, R-Artesia, told the New Mexican. “People want to be included in this.”

Dozens of counties in the state have already declared themselves a “Second Amendment Sanctuary” in opposition to the Democratic-sponsored legislation. The New Mexico Sheriff’s Association previously called the laws unenforceable, saying they would punish law-abiding citizens.

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State Sen. Richard Martinez, D-Española, one of the bill’s sponsors, has said the measure was “about saving lives” and preventing criminals from getting guns. He told the New Mexican that a chance for a referendum was “just another shot in the dark.”

Only three referendums for repeal of a law have gone to public vote since New Mexico gained statehood in 1912 — each one falling short of overturning legislation, the New Mexican reported, citing the Legislative Council Service.

Source: Fox News Politics


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