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Conservative commentator Ann Coulter said she could support Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-VT, in 2020 and even floated the idea of working in his administration if he returned to his earlier stance on immigration.

In a preview clip of PBS’s “Firing Line with Margaret Hoover” released Wednesday, host Margaret Hoover asked Coulter how she viewed the progressive senator. She asked whether she would support him if he campaign on “getting rid of low-skilled workers” to ensure higher wages.

FOX NEWS POLL: TRUMP APPROVAL STEADY SINCE MUELLER PROBE ENDED

“If he went back to his original position, which is the pro-blue-collar position. I mean, it totally makes sense with him,” she said. If he went back to that position, I’d vote for him. I might work for him. I don’t care about the rest of the socialist stuff. Just– can we do something for ordinary Americans?”

Coulter was apparently referencing Sanders’ policy position from 2007 where he opposed an immigration reform bill that he feared would drive down wages for lower-income workers. He co-authored a restrictive immigration amendment with Sen. Chuck Grassley, R-IA. The bill ultimately failed to pass the Senate.

Sanders rejected the idea of having open borders while speaking at a campaign event earlier this month.

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“What we need is comprehensive immigration reform. If you open the borders, my God, there’s a lot of poverty in this world, and you’re going to have people from all over the world. And I don’t think that’s something that we can do at this point. Can’t do it. So that is not my position,” Sanders said.

Coulter, who authored the book “In Trump We Trust” ahead of the 2016 election, was an early supporter of Donald Trump but has since become a vocal critic of the president for not keeping his campaign promise of building a wall at the southern border.

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Republican strategist Karl Rove doesn’t see Thursday’s Mueller report release as the end of a the Trump-Russia collusion narrative, he sees it as “the beginning of the next chapter”

“I wish I believed it was their last gasp. I think tomorrow is the beginning of the next chapter,” Rove said on “Hannity.”

Attorney General William Barr is set to hold a 9:30 a.m. news conference Thursday accompanied by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein ahead of the Justice Department’s planned release of a redacted version of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election

FEDERALIST EDITOR SAYS MUELLER REPORT ORIGINS DEMAND INVESTIGATION

“I think it is going to be first and foremost focusing on…  they want the entire document and that’s going lead then to charges that he obstructed justice and then it’s going to be ‘Katie bar the door.’”

Rove added, “It’s going to be months and months in my opinion of demanding a completely unredacted copy of it.”

President Trump has reportedly prepared a retort and Democrats including Rep. Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi are unhappy with roll out.

“AG Barr has thrown out his credibility & the DOJ’s independence with his single-minded effort to protect @realDonaldTrump above all else. The American people deserve the truth, not a sanitized version of the Mueller Report approved by the Trump Admin,” Nancy Pelosi tweeted Wednesday.

TRUMP LEGAL TEAM PREPARES MUELLER COUNTER-REPORT ON OBSTRUCTION ALLEGATIONS

Rove noted that Democrats will not be satisfied with tomorrow’s redacted report and will continue to promote their narrative.

“People like Adam Schiff and Jerry Nadler are going to be calling for the immediate and total release of everything. You see it in the language of Nancy Pelosi who says that Barr is usurping the responsibility of Congress. Congress is supposed to be the judge and jury, not our legal system,” Rove told Sean Hannity.

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Former Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe revealed Wednesday he will not be entering the 2020 White House race, saying Virginians want him back in the commonwealth to tackle various “problems” on a state level.

McAuliffe still insisted he could beat President Trump “like a rented mule” but despite his strong desire to run, he told CNN anchor Chris Cuomo that “we’ve got issues in Virginia.” He said his state has seen “a lot of problems” since February, an apparent reference to the controversies surrounding current Gov. Ralph Northam involving his use of blackface decades ago, and Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax facing multiple accusations of sexual assault.

“Why are you in politics- to help people. Where can you have the biggest impact on people? And, the leadership in Virginia has been reaching out to me in the last two-and-a-half months. I spent ’til four o’clock in the morning on Saturday morning with the state party chair all night talking. I’ve invested a lot in that state and I love that state,” McAuliffe explained. “We’ve got to win the House and Senate because we can change it, we can take it to the next level. So I’ve listened to the Virginians and I’m gonna help Virginians for the next six months.”

When asked what he thought of the 2020 field of Democrats, he insisted that “most of them” could beat Trump, but suggested that former Vice President Joe Biden had the best chance.

The Democrat expressed that he didn’t want Virginians to feel that he had “abandoned” them and thought he could make a “real difference” much faster in his home state than if he joined an already crowded field of presidential candidates.

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McAuliffe, however, did not rule out another run for the governorship in Virginia.

“I’m still a young man. You’ll see what happens,” McAuliffe continued, “but this is a real opportunity. I’ve started it. I need to finish it.”

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The Five” spent time on Wednesday discussing what to expect from Democrats and the news media as Attorney General William Barr releases a redacted version of the Mueller report — a happening set for Thursday.

We already know the top-line conclusion. There was no collusion, matter of fact there was no effort at collusion, and the Russians tried to collude and the Trump team said no,” co-host Dan Bongino said.

“My question going forward, what the heck was Bob Mueller doing for 675 days?”

TRUMP LEGAL TEAM PREPARES MUELLER COUNTER-REPORT ON OBSTRUCTION ALLEGATIONS

Co-host and liberal commentator Marie Harf believes President Trump is trying to get ahead of the report and speculated he may be “embarrassed” on Thursday.

“It seems a little bit like he’s trying to pre-empt what he knows will not be a uniformly good report for him. There will be things in this report that are embarrassing, that all of us sitting around this table would say I never would’ve done that if I worked on a presidential campaign. I think Trump knows that and is trying to get ahead of it,” Harf said.

Co-host Jesse Watters said negative information is expected when it comes to a comprehensive report.

“There’s going to be some derogatory information in there. Because this was a very brutally intrusive exam into the administration and the campaign. You’re going to find some flaws and this was undertaken by kind of ferocious and — not sinister but angry partisan Democrats with a lot of liberal pedigree. They are going to find some things, but overall no obstruction, no collusion,” Watters said.

WOW: CHELSEA HANDLER SAYS SHE HAS ‘FEELINGS’ FOR ROBERT MUELLER

Watters and co-host Greg Gutfeld specifically called out CNN and other key players in the mainstream media for their relentless focus on the Mueller report.

“I just don’t know how CNN is going to handle it because this last week they had the lowest-rated week of all of 2019,” Watters said. “They have a choice to make. Are they going to now report real news about Spygate, or are they going to continue to push fake news? They lost to the Food Network last week, which means people would rather watch a pot boil then watch CNN.”

“It’s really about the Russians and how they manipulated the media, not the voters. The collusion was Russia playing the media for suckers,” Gutfeld said.

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Mollie Hemingway, senior editor at The Federalist, says that though many think it’s important to move on from the Mueller report following Thursday’s expected release, one aspect that calls for further exploration is how it all began.

“People talk about moving on. That’s important because there are serious policy issues that fixing our border and other things Congress needs to work on — but how did the investigation ever start?” Hemingway said on “Special Report with Bret Baier” on Wednesday.

MUELLER’S QUESTIONS FOR TRUMP

“It was used, not just during the campaign but in the interim, before he [Trump] became president and for the first two years of his administration, to undermine him,” she said. “It affected foreign policy and his ability to get things done.”

Hemingway emphasized that answers were needed in order to avoid a recurrence of the circumstances behind the inquiry.

“People need to make sure the report is put into context. It is not just there was a legitimate reason to look into Russia collusion and there were no indictments … for Russia collusion or obstruction, but a story about how people weaponized information and used it to go after political opponents,” Hemingway told Baier.

“That absolutely must be looked into. We absolutely need to get answers so that it doesn’t happen again and the people who did it are held accountable.”

Barr will release a redacted version of Mueller’s full investigative report on Thursday morning.

Democrats are expected to file subpoenas to see what’s behind the redactions.

Wall Street Journal columnist Jason Riley said Democrats will continue to second-guess the report, but its findings will stand.

“Clearly the Democrats are very upset by this finding. I think what we are going to see is them combing through this report second-guessing Mueller’s findings on no collusion, second-guessing the Justice Department decision that there was no obstruction of justice because there was no underlying crime, and you will see Trump’s team push back and say pick it apart all you want,” Riley said.

“Doesn’t change the central conclusions, no collusion and no obstruction.”

TRUMP LEGAL TEAM PREPARES MUELLER COUNTER-REPORT ON OBSTRUCTION ALLEGATIONS

Amy Walter, national editor of the Cook Political Report, added that no matter what the report says Thursday, it will have no bearing on how the public views President Trump. “His approval ratings, disapproval ratings haven’t moved much given the many things that have happened over the last two years.”

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At least two Democrats have reimbursed the campaign contributions made by Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., who has been at the center of numerous controversies since she was sworn in as a freshman congresswoman last January.

North Carolina’s 9th congressional district candidate Dan McCready refunded $2,000 to Omar in March after she donated to his campaign last November ahead of the 2018 midterms, WSOC reported Wednesday.

A spokesman for McCready told the news station he’d refunded Omar’s contribution because “he believes there is no place for divisiveness in politics, and McCready did not feel it is appropriate to accept the donation.”

A winner still has not been declared in the 9th congressional district race, which became ensnared in accusations of absentee ballot fraud after Election Day.

Rep. Lucy McBath, D-Ga., also rejected Omar’s $2,000 donation that was made March 27.

The Washington Free Beacon initially reported McBath was one of two Democrats in Congress who did not disclose the contributions made by the Minnesota congresswoman in their quarterly fundraising reports. Members of McBath’s campaign, however, told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution they didn’t disclose the donation because they’d decided to reject it.

DOZENS OF DEMS VOTE 95 PERCENT OF THE TIME WITH AOC DESPITE PELOSI’S CLAIMS

The other Democrat who did not disclose the donation was Connecticut Rep. Jahana Hayes, whose campaign told the Free Beacon that Omar’s contribution would be included in its next fundraising report. The campaign said it was “absolutely not” an effort to keep it hidden.

The Minnesota lawmaker had been condemned for what critics have called anti-Semitic remarks about supporters of Israel.

More recently, she took heat — including from President Trump — for a line in a speech she gave to the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR). She said, in her defense of the organization, that CAIR was founded after Sept. 11, 2001, “because they recognized that some people did something and that all of us were starting to lose access to our civil liberties.” CAIR formed in 1994.

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Critics said her line “some people did something” was insulting to victims of the terrorist attacks.

Fox News did not receive an immediate response from McCready or McBath’s campaigns.

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A top Democrat in Congress on Wednesday challenged White House aide Stephen Miller to testify before the House Oversight and Reform Committee and defend the hardline immigration policies he has championed and, in some cases, engineered.

The offer by the chairman of the panel, Rep. Elijah Cummings, D-Md., appeared designed to appeal to the 33-year-old senior White House adviser’s propensity for spirited debate. A video of Miller’s contentious immigration showdown with CNN anchor Wolf Blitzer earlier in the year went viral.

The offer came days after Rep. Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., on Sunday said Miller, “who seems to be the boss of everybody on immigration,” should appear in front of Congress and try to explain the president’s recently revived idea to send migrants from the border to sanctuary cities. Nadler told CNN that he learned from “whistleblowers” that Miller was behind the proposal.

The combative Miller is one of the White House’s most conservative and influential voices in pushing other moves that Trump has taken to curb immigration, including the administration’s travel ban on several Muslim-majority nations that was ultimately upheld by the Supreme Court.

WHITE HOUSE CONFIRMS PLAN TO SEND ILLEGAL IMMIGRANTS TO SANCTUARY CITIES IS UNDER ACTIVE THOROUGH REVIEW

The White House did not immediately respond to a request for comment. Past administrations have often refused to send White House aides to testify before Congress, though there have been exceptions.

Should such a session occur, it would be bound to ignite fireworks over an issue that has repeatedly produced heated clashes between Trump and congressional Democrats. Trump has made an immigration crackdown a cornerstone of his appeal to conservative voters, while Democrats — led by liberal and Hispanic lawmakers — have been just as adamant in opposing his moves.

WASHINGTON, DC - MAY 17: House Oversight and Government Reform Committee ranking member Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD) speaks during a news conference at the U.S. Capitol May 17, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

WASHINGTON, DC – MAY 17: House Oversight and Government Reform Committee ranking member Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-MD) speaks during a news conference at the U.S. Capitol May 17, 2017 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

“I understand that you may not want to submit yourself to rigorous questioning,” Cummings said in his letter to Miller requesting his appearance.

“I want to make clear that I am inviting you to appear voluntarily,” Cummings wrote. “I am offering you an opportunity to make your case to the committee and the American people about why you — and presumably President Trump — believe it is good policy for the Trump administration to take the actions it has.”

Cummings cited the separation of migrant children from detained parents, a policy Trump withdrew under fire last year; Trump’s threat to move detained migrants to “sanctuary cities,” communities that limit cooperation with federal immigration authorities and that are mostly in Democratic areas; and the removal of top Homeland Security officials, including Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen.

Cummings said he wanted Miller to testify to his committee on May 1 and gave him until April 24 to respond.

Meanwhile, Senate Homeland Security Chairman Ron Johnson said he is working on legislation to help stem the flow of migrants at the U.S.-Mexico border.

Johnson, R-Wis., said he wants to toughen the initial standard for asylum seekers to “more than a probable chance” they’ll experience violence or persecution in their home countries. Right now, if people can demonstrate “credible fear,” they’re allowed to stay in the U.S. as their cases progress.

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Johnson said in an interview that asylum cases must be adjudicated faster and that asylum seekers should be detained while they wait.

Johnson visited this week with migrants in Border Patrol custody on the southwestern border. He said most were seeking a better life and said that while he’s sympathetic to their circumstances, that doesn’t mean they should be granted asylum.

Fox News’ Edmund DeMarche and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Democrats in Congress attacked Attorney General William Barr Wednesday evening ahead of the Justice Department’s planned release of a redacted version of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s report on Russian interference in the 2016 presidential election and allegations of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russian officials.

Barr is set to hold a 9:30 a.m. news conference Thursday accompanied by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who oversaw the Mueller investigation after the special counsel’s appointment in May 2017. Neither Mueller nor other members of his team will attend, according to special counsel spokesman Peter Carr. Democrats have criticized the timing of the news conference, saying that Barr would get to present his interpretation of the Mueller report before Congress and the public see it.

At a news conference Wednesday evening, House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., said the panel was expected to receive a copy of the report between 11 a.m. and noon, “well after the attorney general’s 9:30 a.m. press conference. This is wrong.”

“The attorney general appears to be waging a media campaign on behalf of President Trump, the very subject of the investigation at the heart of the Mueller report,” Nadler told reporters. “Rather than letting the facts of the report speak for themselves, the attorney general has taken unprecedented steps to spin Mueller’s nearly two-year investigation.”

Hakeem Jeffries, another member of the Judiciary Committee and the chairman of the House Democratic Caucus, accused Barr — whom Jeffries dubbed the “so-called Attorney General” of “presiding over a dog and pony show.

“Here is a thought,” Jeffries added. “Release the Mueller report tomorrow morning and keep your mouth shut. You have ZERO credibility.”

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., tweeted that Barr “has thrown out his credibility & the DOJ’s independence with his single-minded effort to protect ⁦‪@realDonaldTrump⁩ above all else. The American people deserve the truth, not a sanitized version of the Mueller Report approved by the Trump Admin.”

Senate Minority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., said, “The process is poisoned before the report is even released.”

“Barr shouldn’t be spinning the report at all, but it’s doubly outrageous he’s doing it before America is given a chance to read it,” Schumer added.

Democrats were further angered Wednesday by a New York Times report which said Justice Department officials have had “numerous conversations with White House lawyers” about Mueller’s conclusions, which have aided the president’s legal team as it prepares a rebuttal to the special counsel’s report. The Times report has not been independently confirmed by Fox News.

Late Wednesday, Nadler and four other Democratic committee chairs released a joint statement calling on Barr to cancel the Thursday morning news conference, calling it “unnecessary and inappropriate.”

“He [Barr] should let the full report speak for itself, read the statement from Nadler, Adam Schiff, D-Calif., Elijah Cummings, D-Md., Maxine Waters, D-Calif., and Eliot Engel, D-N.Y. “The Attorney General should cancel the press conference and provide the full report to Congress, as we have requested. With the Special Counsel’s fact-gathering work concluded, it is now Congress’ responsibility to assess the findings and evidence and proceed accordingly.”

In court filings in the case against Roger Stone on Wednesday, the Justice Department also said it planned to provide a “limited number” of members of Congress and their staff access to a copy of the Mueller report with fewer redactions than the public version. Nadler claimed Wednesday evening that the Judiciary Committee “has no knowledge of this and this should not be read as any agreement or knowledge or assent on our part.”

Nadler added that he would “probably find it useful” to call Mueller and members of his team to testify after reading the version of the report Barr releases.

The report is expected to reveal what Mueller uncovered about ties between the Trump campaign and Russia that fell short of criminal conduct. And, it likely will lay out the special counsel’s conclusions about formative episodes in Trump’s presidency, including his firing of FBI Director James Comey; his request of Comey to end an investigation into Trump’s first national security adviser, Michael Flynn; his relentless badgering of former Attorney General Jeff Sessions over his recusal from the Russia investigation; and his role in drafting an explanation about a meeting his oldest son took at Trump Tower with a Kremlin-connected lawyer.

The report is not expected to place the president in legal jeopardy, as Barr made his own decision that Trump shouldn’t be prosecuted for obstruction. But it is likely to contain unflattering details about the president’s efforts to control the Russia investigation

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Overall, Mueller brought charges against 34 people — including six Trump aides and advisers — and revealed a sophisticated, wide-ranging Russian effort to influence the 2016 presidential election. Twenty-five of those charged were Russians accused either in the hacking of Democratic email accounts or of a hidden but powerful social media effort to spread disinformation online.

Five former Trump aides or advisers pleaded guilty and agreed to cooperate in Mueller’s investigation, including former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort, former national security adviser Michael Flynn and his former personal lawyer, Michael Cohen. Stone is awaiting trial on charges including false statements and obstruction.

Fox News’ Jake Gibson, Chad Pergram and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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Nearly two years of fevered speculation surrounding Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia probe will come to a head in a dramatic television finale-like moment on Thursday morning at 9:30 a.m. ET, when Attorney General William Barr and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein are set to hold a press conference to discuss the Mueller report’s public release.

It was not immediately clear exactly when on Thursday the DOJ would release the redacted version of the nearly 400-page investigation into Russian election meddling. But with just hours to go until that moment, hopes for finality amid a deep national divide — and persistent accusations of far-flung conspiracies — are all but certain to remain unrealized.

Although Barr has already revealed that Mueller’s report absolved the Trump team of illegally colluding with Russia, Democrats have signaled that the release will be just the beginning of a no-holds-barred showdown with the Trump administration over the extent of report redactions, as well as whether the president obstructed justice during the Russia investigation.

FOX NEWS POLL: TRUMP POPULARITY HOLDING STEADY AFTER MUELLER SUMMARY RELEASE

Trump’s legal team is preparing to issue a comprehensive rebuttal report on Thursday, to challenge any allegations of obstruction against the president, Fox News has learned.

The lawyers originally laid out their rebuttal in response to written questions asked by Mueller’s team of the president last year, according to a source close to Trump’s legal team.

Special Counsel Robert Mueller drives away from his Washington home on Wednesday. Outstanding questions about the special counsel's Russia investigation have not stopped President Donald Trump and his allies from declaring victory. (AP Photo/Kevin Wolf)

Special Counsel Robert Mueller drives away from his Washington home on Wednesday. Outstanding questions about the special counsel’s Russia investigation have not stopped President Donald Trump and his allies from declaring victory. (AP Photo/Kevin Wolf)

Barr has said redactions in the report’s release are legally mandated.to protect four broad areas of concern: sensitive grand jury-related matters, classified information, ongoing investigations and the privacy or reputation of uncharged “peripheral” people.

Those individuals, Barr said, did not include Trump. “No, I’m talking about people in private life, not public officeholders,” the attorney general said at a hearing last week.

ANTI-TRUMP FBI AGENT PETER STRZOK’S PHONE TOTALLY WIPED AFTER HE WAS FIRED FROM MUELLER TEAM

In a filing in the ongoing Roger Stone prosecution on Wednesday, the DOJ revealed that certain members of Congress will be able to see the Mueller report “without certain redactions” in a secure setting. Stone, a longtime confidant of the president, is awaiting trial on charges including giving false statements and obstructing justice.

Barr and Rosenstein are expected to take questions at the Thursday press conference, which was first announced in a radio interview by Trump and confirmed by the DOJ, and they’ll likely be pressed on the precise nature of the final redactions.

The chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, Democrat New York Rep. Jerrold Nadler, has said he is prepared to issue subpoenas “very quickly” for the full report if it is released with blacked-out sections, likely setting in motion a major legal battle.

NUNES’ CRIMINAL REFERRALS OVER MISCONDUCT DURING RUSSIA PROBE COULD INVOLVE ‘TWO DOZEN’ INDIVIDUALS

Grand jury information, including witness interviews, is normally off limits but can be obtained in court. Some records were eventually released in the Whitewater investigation into former President Bill Clinton and an investigation into President Richard Nixon before he resigned.

Attorney General William Barr reacts as he appears before a Senate Appropriations subcommittee to make his Justice Department budget request, Wednesday, April 10, 2019, in Washington. Barr said Wednesday that he was reviewing the origins of the Trump-Russia investigation. He said he believed the president's campaign had been spied on and he was concerned about possible abuses of government power. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Attorney General William Barr reacts as he appears before a Senate Appropriations subcommittee to make his Justice Department budget request, Wednesday, April 10, 2019, in Washington. Barr said Wednesday that he was reviewing the origins of the Trump-Russia investigation. He said he believed the president’s campaign had been spied on and he was concerned about possible abuses of government power. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Both of those cases were under somewhat different circumstances, including that the House Judiciary Committee had initiated impeachment proceedings. Federal court rules state that a court may order disclosure “preliminary to or in connection with a judicial proceeding,” but prominent Democrats — including House Speaker Nancy Pelosi — have dismissed suggestions that Trump should face impeachment.

Another major area of scrutiny will be Barr’s decision, along with Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, that Mueller had not uncovered sufficient evidence to prosecute Trump for obstruction of justice.

In his four-page summary of Mueller’s findings released late last month, Barr stated definitively that Mueller did not establish evidence that Trump’s team or any associates of the Trump campaign had conspired with Russia to sway the 2016 election — “despite multiple offers from Russian-affiliated individuals to assist the Trump campaign.”

But on obstruction, Barr wrote that Mueller had laid out evidence on “both sides” of the issue, even as he acknowledged that it would be more difficult to prosecute an obstruction case without evidence of any underlying crime. That evidence, on Thursday, will go under the microscope.

FBI MADE 11 PAYMENTS TO AUTHOR OF DISCREDITED DOSSIER USED TO JUSTIFY SURVEILLANCE OF TRUMP AIDE

The report may also contain unflattering details about the president’s efforts to exert control over the Russia investigation. And it may paint the Trump campaign as eager to exploit Russian aid and emails stolen from Democrats and Hillary Clinton’s campaign.

The report’s release will also be a test of Barr’s credibility, as the public and Congress judge the veracity of a letter he released relaying what were purported to be Mueller’s principal conclusions.

Barr, who was unanimously confirmed by the Senate to the role of attorney general in 1991 before reclaiming the role in February, has endured withering criticism from Democrats who say he is covering for the president.

Mueller is known to have investigated multiple efforts by the president over the last two years to influence the Russia probe or shape public perception of it.

In addition to examining former FBI Director James Comey’s firing, Mueller scrutinized the president’s reported request that Comey end an investigation into Trump’s first national security adviser; his relentless attacks on former Attorney General Jeff Sessions over his recusal from the Russia investigation; and his role in drafting an incomplete explanation about a meeting his oldest son took at Trump Tower with a Kremlin-connected lawyer.

But this week, Trump, who has long said that voicing his opinions about the “witch hunt” against him wasn’t a crime — showed no signs of backing down.

WHAT’S GOING TO BE INSIDE THE TRUMP TEAM’S MUELLER COUNTER-REPORT?

“Wow! FBI made 11 payments to Fake Dossier’s discredited author, Trump hater Christopher Steele,” Trump wrote on Wednesday. “The Witch Hunt has been a total fraud on your President and the American people! It was brought to you by Dirty Cops, Crooked Hillary and the DNC.

On Monday, he wrote: “Mueller, and the A.G. based on Mueller findings (and great intelligence), have already ruled No Collusion, No Obstruction. These were crimes committed by Crooked Hillary, the DNC, Dirty Cops and others! INVESTIGATE THE INVESTIGATORS!”

Republicans, including House Intelligence Committee ranking member Devin Nunes, have pushed aggressively for answers into the origins of the Mueller probe, which began shortly after Trump fired Comey in May 2017.

Trump cited several justifications for terminating Comey, including what the president called his mismanagement of the Hillary Clinton email probe, and Comey’s refusal to publicly announce that the president was not under investigation.

The former FBI head acknowledged in testimony in December that when the bureau initiated its counterintelligence probe into possible collusion between Trump campaign officials and the Russian government in July 2016, investigators “didn’t know whether we had anything.”

An op-ed in The Washington Post earlier in the week, entitled “Admit it: Fox News has been right all along,” pointed to the role in the media in spreading the Russia collusion narrative.

Justice Department legal opinions say that a sitting president cannot be indicted, but Barr said he did not take that into account when he decided the evidence was insufficient to establish obstruction.

That conclusion was perhaps not surprising given Barr’s own unsolicited memo to the Justice Department from last June in which he said a president could not obstruct justice by taking actions — like the firing of an FBI director — that he is legally empowered to take.

Overall, Mueller brought charges against 34 people — including six Trump aides and advisers — and revealed a Russian effort to influence the 2016 presidential election.

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Twenty-five of those charged were Russians accused either in the hacking of Democratic email accounts or of a hidden but powerful social media effort to spread disinformation online.

Five former Trump aides or advisers pleaded guilty to charges unrelated to collusion and agreed to cooperate in Mueller’s investigation, including former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort, former national security adviser Michael Flynn and his former personal lawyer, Michael Cohen.

Fox News’ Brooke Singman, Jake Gibson and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Former Massachusetts Gov. Bill Weld said the country is in grave peril, and he can no longer sit on the sidelines.

“Let the record reflect that I’m now in second place in the Republican primary,” he told the “Fox News Rundown” podcast Wednesday, discussing his decision to challenge Trump for the party nod in the 2020 race.

On Monday, he became the first Republican to challenge Trump in the party primaries. That makes Trump the first incumbent president since George H.W. Bush in 1992 to face a notable primary challenge.

TRUMP ALREADY AMASSING HUGE WAR CHEST FOR 2020 — CHALLENGERS BEWARE

Fiscally conservative but socially liberal, Weld is known for an unconventional, at times quirky, political style and a long history of friction with the party he now aspires to represent.

Weld, 73, said in announcing his candidacy on Monday that “it is time to return to the principles of Lincoln — equality, dignity and opportunity for all.”

“There is no greater cause on earth than to preserve what truly makes America great. I am ready to lead that fight.”

Weld has said that Trump’s “priorities are skewed toward promotion of himself rather than … the good of the country.”

About the daunting challenges ahead, Weld said: “It’s always uphill against an incumbent. And you know, I’m I think a poll I saw within the last few days had me at 8 percent nationally, which is where both Bernie Sanders and Donald Trump were at this stage four years ago.”

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While Trump’s overall approval ratings have been poor for much of his presidency, he remains popular with Republican voters. The Republican National Committee in January issued a nonbinding resolution to declare the party’s undivided support for Trump.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics


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