Newsmax – Politics

Sen. Tom Udall announced Monday that he will not seek re-election in 2020, ending a long career of representing the state of New Mexico in the U.S. Congress.

"The worst thing anyone in public office can do is believe the office belongs to them, rather than to the people they represent. That’s why I’m announcing today that I won’t be seeking re-election next year,” Udall, 70, a Democrat, said in a statement.

Udall, a member of the Senate's Foreign Relations and Appropriations committees, has served in the chamber since 2009 and before that was in the House of Representatives for a decade. His uncle, Morris Udall, was a prominent member of the House of Representatives who ran unsuccessfully for president in 1976.

Democrats are hoping to capture majority control of the Senate in the November 2020 elections. Republicans hold 53 seats, Democrats have 45 and two independents align themselves with the Democrats.

Republicans will be defending 21 of their seats next year, while Democrats will have 12 up for grabs.

So far, two Republicans, Lamar Alexander of Tennessee and Pat Roberts of Kansas, have announced their retirements.

Democrats are thought to have a strong chance of holding Udall's seat in New Mexico.

In his announcement, Udall said "there will be more chapters in my public service," but he did say whether he plans to run for another elective office.

Source: NewsMax

Democratic House committee chairmen who want to keep looking into claims of collusion and obstruction on the part of President Donald Trump and his 2016 campaign will not find anything that special counsel Robert Mueller was not able to find over the course of his lengthy investigation, Rep. John Ratcliffe, R-Texas, said Monday.

"Bob Mueller, who had unlimited time, unlimited money, unlimited resources, 40 FBI agents working with 20 federal prosecutors couldn't find any evidence of any crimes," the Texas Republican, a member of the House Intelligence and Judiciary committees, told Fox News' "America's Newsroom." "What in the name of God's green Earth makes anyone think that Adam Schiff, Jerry Nadler, and Elijah Cummings could find what Bob Mueller couldn't?"

Ratcliff noted that in the Senate, where Republicans control the Judiciary Committee, Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., has already agreed there are questions surrounding the push for the Mueller investigation.

He also called it "disappointing" so many people are saying the investigation is not over and said the House does not need to investigate what Mueller already has.

Ratcliffe said he has spoken with Inspector General Michael Horowitz, and learned he hopes to be finished with his own report on Trump by May or June.

Further, he said John Huber, the U.S. attorney in Utah, has "been dispatched" to look into the potential that "criminal aspects" might have come into play behind the Mueller probe.

"Between those investigations, the American people will hopefully get answers to those questions much sooner than later," Ratcliffe said.

Source: NewsMax

Special Counsel Robert Mueller informed top U.S. Justice Department officials three weeks ago that he would not be reaching a conclusion on whether President Donald Trump had obstructed justice during the probe into Russian interference in the 2016 election, a U.S. Justice official said Monday.

The decision by Mueller not to reach a determination was "unexpected," the person added, speaking anonymously in order to discuss private conversations involving U.S. Attorney General William Barr and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who received the news.

Source: NewsMax

Democrats in Congress have effectively shut out Republicans from the legislative process since taking control of the House, multiple members of the GOP told Politico on Monday.

Rep. Richard Hudson, R-N.C., told Politico that in the past two sessions of Congress, he and Rep. Bobby Rush, D-Ill., have cooperated on a bill that would boost workforce-training initiatives. This year, however, Rush “reintroduced it… added all this money to it, and didn’t consult” Hudson, according to the Republican.

“I don’t have thin skin about this, but when they were in charge, they had the rules,” said Rep. Mike Doyle, D-Pa., who’s served in the House for more than two decades. “Now we’re in charge, and maybe some of them don’t understand that yet.”

“Now that Rep. Rush is chairman, he decided to beef up the legislation by adding funding to make it easier for candidates who are going through training to receive wages while they are doing so,” a spokesperson for the congressman told Politico. “Chairman Rush continues to reach out to Republicans in hopes that they will finally agree to fund this jobs program.”

Florida GOP Rep. Mario Diaz-Balart added that he thought Democrats would approach him to work on legislation for Dreamers, which has been a key issue of his in recent years, but Democrats released their own plan without any Republican sponsors.

“I feared that this was going to be Democratic leadership’s strategy — not trying to actually work in a way to put bills on the floor to become law, but on the contrary, doing it in a way that it won’t become law, just to score political points,” Diaz-Balart told Politico.

Source: NewsMax

The Republican chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee said on Monday he wants Attorney General William Barr to appear before the panel in a public hearing to discuss the special counsel's report on Russian interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election.

"What's next, I hope, will be that he will come to the committee (and) release as much as possible of the Mueller report," Sen. Lindsey Graham said, referring to the report by Special Counsel Robert Mueller.

Source: NewsMax

There have been no conversations about President Donald Trump issuing pardons for any of his associates who have been charged or pleaded guilty as part of the U.S. Special Counsel Robert Mueller's Russia investigation, the White House said Monday.

There has been "no discussion that I'm aware of" regarding pardons, White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders told reporters. Fellow White House spokesman Hogan Gidley also told MSNBC in an interview that the White House has not had any conversations about such pardons.

Gidley said he did not know whether any lawyers for Trump's associates had approached the White House counsel about pardons.

Mueller's team finished up work on Friday and submitted its findings to U.S. Attorney General William Barr, who issued a four-page summary on Sunday. Barr said the Special Counsel's Office had found no evidence of criminal collusion between Trump's campaign and Russia in the 2016 election but had left open the issue of whether Trump had tried to obstruct justice.

Still, Mueller's investigation led to charges and guilty pleas against dozens of people, including a series of Russian nationals and companies as well as several top Trump advisers, such as former campaign chairman Paul Manafort, former White House national security adviser Michael Flynn and former adviser Roger Stone.

"We have a very rigorous process that relates to pardons," Gidley told MSNBC.

Source: NewsMax

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., has more "breathing room" on deciding whether to seek impeachment charges against President Donald Trump following the end of special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation, Politico reports.

Mueller delivered the results of his investigation into Russian election interference in the 2016 election to Attorney General William Barr last week. Barr later released a summary of his findings, and wrote Mueller did not find evidence of collusion.

Pelosi has repeatedly warned impeaching Trump would not be a quick or simple process, and called for Democrats to wait until the special counsel completed his report before deciding whether or not to seek Trump's impeachment.

"I think her instincts were correct, that we're putting way too much into the Mueller report, and what if it disappoints?" Rep. Gerry Connolly, D-Va., told Politico. "What did we really think Mueller was going to do?"

He added the report "exposes some of those early calls [for impeachment] for being premature and not based on the evidence at hand. And I think it sets that back. It doesn't let [Trump] off the hook, but you cried wolf way too early."

Rep. Marc Veasey, D-Texas, added "not only was Nancy wise, but because of her experience she was able to lead us and guide us in the right direction on this. It also takes a certain level of strength and character to be able to deal with this in today's [environment]."

Source: NewsMax

The Supreme Court is rejecting an appeal from a company owned by an unidentified foreign government that has refused to turn over information demanded by special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation.

The justices didn't comment Monday in turning away the company, which is racking up a fine of $50,000 a day for not complying with the grand jury subpoena for documents.

Mueller turned over his report to Attorney General William Barr on Friday, but the status of the grand jury is unclear.

Fines have been accruing since Jan. 15 and could total nearly $3.5 million. New daily fines stop once the grand jury is discharged.

Mueller found no evidence President Donald Trump's campaign "conspired or coordinated" with Russia to influence the 2016 presidential election but reached no conclusion on whether Trump obstructed justice. Trump claims vindication.

Source: NewsMax

Russia is reacting with an "I told you so" on Monday in state media after the conclusion of Special Counsel Robert Mueller's investigation into Moscow's involvement in the U.S. presidential election didn't find evidence of collusion.

Wrapping up 22 months of the investigation, Mueller's report that was delivered over the weekend found no evidence that U.S. President Donald Trump's campaign conspired with Russian officials to influence the 2016 election.

The released summary, however, didn't clear the president of improper behavior regarding Russia but didn't establish that "he was involved in an underlying crime related to Russian election interference," Mueller said in a passage from the report quoted by U.S. Attorney General William Barr.

Russian officials and state media who have vehemently denied that the Kremlin wanted Trump to win and was helping him in the campaign on Monday relished the news.

"The results of Mueller's investigation are a disgrace for the U.S. and its political elites," Alexei Pushkov, chairman of the information committee at the Federation Council, tweeted on Monday. "All of the accusations were proved to be trumped up."

Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov had a more muted reaction on Monday, saying that Russia has never interfered in elections in other countries and "doesn't intend to do so."

"It's hard to find a black cat in a dark room, especially if it isn't there," he said.

Thirty-four people, including six Trump aides and advisers, were charged in the investigation. Twenty-five are Russians accused of election interference either through hacking into Democratic accounts or orchestrating a social media campaign to spread disinformation on the internet.

Russian authorities over the past months portrayed the Mueller probe as a witch hunt against Trump and a tool of the Democratic Party to fan the flames of the anti-Russian sentiment in the U.S.

Konstantin Kosachev, chairman of the foreign affairs committee at the Federation Council, on Monday described the probe and the discussions around it as "two years of incessant lies."

State-owned Channel One on its morning news show suggested that U.S. media had been consciously whipping up the hysteria about possible collusion in order to sway the public opinion against Russia.

"There were so many fake scoops: the one about the non-existent back channel between Washington and Moscow, the one about the so-called Russia Dossier with the Kremlin's alleged compromising information on Trump," Channel One's U.S. correspondent said. "But will the viewers hear the rebuttals now?"

The conclusions of the probe led some to believe that Trump will have a free hand now to improve ties with Russia.

"There's an opportunity to reset out relations but the question is whether Trump will take the risk," Kosachev said.

Source: NewsMax

The summary of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report “raises as many questions as it answers," and thus the full document should be released to the public, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer said in a joint statement on Sunday, The Hill reported.

"The fact that Special Counsel Mueller’s report does not exonerate the president on a charge as serious as obstruction of justice demonstrates how urgent it is that the full report and underlying documentation be made public without any further delay," the Democratic Party leaders said.

They issued the statement after Barr sent a letter to Congress summarizing the key findings of Mueller's investigation into the Trump campaign's ties with Russia.

Barr stated in the letter that Mueller found no conclusive evidence that the Trump campaign conspired with the Russian government to interfere in the 2016 election. However, on the issue of obstruction of justice, the attorney general wrote that “while this report does not conclude the president committed a crime, it does not exonerate him.”

Several Democratic presidential candidates emphasized that point to press for a full release of the report.

New Jersey Sen. Cory Booker tweeted that "The American public deserves the full report and findings from the Mueller investigation immediately – not just the in-house summary from a Trump Administration official." 

Source: NewsMax

Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s final report sounds like a “law school exam,” where he shirked his job and didn’t have “the guts” to make a decision on whether President Donald Trump obstructed justice, Harvard Law professor emeritus Alan Dershowitz said Sunday during an appearance on Fox News where he also slammed CNN personalities and guests who “misinformed the American public.”

Mueller turned in his final report Friday, and Attorney General William Barr on Sunday in a letter to Congress said the investigation concluded there was no collusion between the Russian government and the Trump campaign during the 2016 presidential election.

On the topic of potential obstruction of justice on the part of President Donald Trump, the special counsel referred the question of criminality to the attorney general.

“I thought it was a cop out for him to say there was not enough evidence to indict, but it’s not an exoneration, and we’re going to put a report out,” Dershowitz told anchor Shannon Bream “… It sounds like a law school exam. That’s not the job of the prosecutor. The job of the prosecutor is to decide yes or no. Make a decision.”

The TV personalities and guests on CNN who predicted Mueller’s probe would result in indictments for collusion and obstruction “should be hanging their heads in shame,” Dershowitz added.

“I have to tell you, they should be hanging their head in shame when you think about how many people went out on a limb and predicted there would be indictments for obstruction, there would be indictments for collusion, there would be indictments for this and for that,” he.

“They made it seem like it was an open and shut case, and they misinformed the American public, and they have to have some public accountability when you say things that turn out not to be true.”

Source: NewsMax

The text of Attorney General William Barr's letter to congressional lawmakers outlining the principal conclusions reached by the special counsel in the Russia probe (with footnotes below):

March 24, 2019

Dear Chairman Graham, Chairman Nadler, Ranking Member Feinstein, and Ranking Member Collins:

As a supplement to the notification provided on Friday, March 22, 2019, I am writing today to advise you of the principal conclusions reached by Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III and to inform you about the status of my initial review of the report he has prepared.

THE SPECIAL COUNSEL'S REPORT

On Friday, the Special Counsel submitted to me a "confidential report explaining the prosecution or declination decisions" he has reached, as required by 28 C.F.R. 600.8(c). This report is entitled "Report on the Investigation into Russian Interference in the 2016 Presidential Election." Although my review is ongoing, I believe that it is in the public interest to describe the report and to summarize the principal conclusions reached by the Special Counsel and the results of his investigation.

The report explains that the Special Counsel and his staff thoroughly investigated allegations that members of the presidential campaign of Donald J. Trump, and others associated with it, conspired with the Russian government in its efforts to interfere in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, or sought to obstruct the related federal investigations. In the report, the Special Counsel noted that, in completing his investigation, he employed 19 lawyers who were assisted by a team of approximately 40 FBI agents, intelligence analysts, forensic accountants, and other professional staff. The Special Counsel issued more than 2,800 subpoenas, executed nearly 500 search warrants, obtained more than 230 orders for communication records, issued almost 50 orders authorizing use of pen registers, made 13 requests to foreign governments for evidence, and interviewed approximately 500 witnesses.

The Special Counsel obtained a number of indictments and convictions of individuals and entities in connection with his investigation, all of which have been publicly disclosed. During the course of his investigation, the Special Counsel also referred several matters to other offices for further action. The report does not recommend any further indictments, nor did the Special Counsel obtain any sealed indictments that have yet to be made public. Below, I summarize the principal conclusions set out in the Special Counsel's report.

Russian Interference in the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election. The Special Counsel's report is divided into two parts. The first describes the results of the Special Counsel's investigation into Russia's interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. The report outlines the Russian effort to influence the election and documents crimes committed by persons associated with the Russian government in connection with those efforts. The report further explains that a primary consideration for the Special Counsel's investigation was whether any Americans – including individuals associated with the Trump campaign – joined the Russian conspiracies to influence the election, which would be a federal crime. The Special Counsel's investigation did not find that the Trump campaign or anyone associated with it conspired or coordinated with Russia in its efforts to influence the 2016 U.S. presidential election. As the report states: "(T)he investigation did not establish that members of the Trump Campaign conspired or coordinated with the Russian government in its election interference activities." (1)

The Special Counsel's investigation determined that there were two main Russian efforts to influence the 2016 election. The first involved attempts by a Russian organization, the Internet Research Agency (IRA), to conduct disinformation and social media operations in the United States designed to sow social discord, eventually with the aim of interfering with the election. As noted above, the Special Counsel did not find that any U.S. person or Trump campaign official or associate conspired or knowingly coordinated with the IRA in its efforts, although the Special Counsel brought criminal charges against a number of Russian nationals and entities in connection with these activities.

The second element involved the Russian government's efforts to conduct computer hacking operations designed to gather and disseminate information to influence the election. The Special Counsel found that Russian government actors successfully hacked into computers and obtained emails from persons affiliated with the Clinton campaign and Democratic Party organizations, and publicly disseminated those materials through various intermediaries, including WikiLeaks. Based on these activities, the Special Counsel brought criminal charges against a number of Russian military officers for conspiring to hack into computers in the United States for purposes of influencing the election. But as noted above, the Special Counsel did not find that the Trump campaign, or anyone associated with it, conspired or coordinated with the Russian government in these efforts, despite multiple offers from Russian-affiliated individuals to assist the Trump campaign.

Obstruction of Justice. The report's second part addresses a number of actions by the President – most of which have been the subject of public reporting – that the Special Counsel investigated as potentially raising obstruction-of-justice concerns. After making a "thorough factual investigation" into these matters, the Special Counsel considered whether to evaluate the conduct under Department standards governing prosecution and declination decisions but ultimately determined not to make a traditional prosecutorial judgment. The Special Counsel therefore did not draw a conclusion – one way or the other – as to whether the examined conduct constituted obstruction. Instead, for each of the relevant actions investigated, the report sets out evidence on both sides of the question and leaves unresolved what the Special Counsel views as "difficult issues" of law and fact concerning whether the President's actions and intent could be viewed as obstruction. The Special Counsel states that "while this report does not conclude that the President committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him."

The Special Counsel's decision to describe the facts of his obstruction investigation without reaching any legal conclusions leaves it to the Attorney General to determine whether the conduct described in the report constitutes a crime. Over the course of the investigation, the Special Counsel's office engaged in discussions with certain Department officials regarding many of the legal and factual matters at issue in the Special Counsel's obstruction investigation. After reviewing the Special Counsel's final report on these issues; consulting with Department officials, including the Office of Legal Counsel; and applying the principles of federal prosecution that guide our charging decisions, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and I have concluded that the evidence developed during the Special Counsel's investigation is not sufficient to establish that the President committed an obstruction-of-justice offense. Our determination was made without regard to, and is not based on, the constitutional considerations that surround the indictment and criminal prosecution of a sitting president. (2)

In making this determination, we noted that the Special Counsel recognized that "the evidence does not establish that the President was involved in an underlying crime related to Russian election interference," and that, while not determinative, the absence of such evidence bears upon the President's intent with respect to obstruction. Generally speaking, to obtain and sustain an obstruction conviction, the government would need to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that a person, acting with corrupt intent, engaged in obstructive conduct with a sufficient nexus to a pending or contemplated proceeding. In cataloguing the President's actions, many of which took place in public view, the report identifies no actions that, in our judgment, constitute obstructive conduct, had a nexus to a pending or contemplated proceeding, and were done with corrupt intent, each of which, under the Department's principles of federal prosecution guiding charging decisions, would need to be proven beyond a reasonable doubt to establish an obstruction-of- justice offense.

STATUS OF THE DEPARTMENT'S REVIEW

The relevant regulations contemplate that the Special Counsel's report will be a "confidential report" to the Attorney General. See Office of Special Counsel, 64 Fed. Reg. 37,038,37,040-41 (July 9,1999). As I have previously stated, however, I am mindful of the public interest in this matter. For that reason, my goal and intent is to release as much of the Special Counsel's report as I can consistent with applicable law, regulations, and Departmental policies.

Based on my discussions with the Special Counsel and my initial review, it is apparent that the report contains material that is or could be subject to Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 6(e), which imposes restrictions on the use and disclosure of information relating to "matter(s) occurring before (a) grand jury." Fed. R. Crim. P. 6(e)(2)(B). Rule 6(e) generally limits disclosure of certain grand jury information in a criminal investigation and prosecution. Id. Disclosure of 6(e) material beyond the strict limits set forth in the rule is a crime in certain circumstances. See, e.g., 18 U.S.C. 401(3). This restriction protects the integrity of grand jury proceedings and ensures that the unique and invaluable investigative powers of a grand jury are used strictly for their intended criminal justice function.

Given these restrictions, the schedule for processing the report depends in part on how quickly the Department can identify the 6(e) material that by law cannot be made public. I have requested the assistance of the Special Counsel in identifying all 6(e) information contained in the report as quickly as possible. Separately, I also must identify any information that could impact other ongoing matters, including those that the Special Counsel has referred to other offices. As soon as that process is complete, I will be in a position to move forward expeditiously in determining what can be released in light of applicable law, regulations, and Departmental policies.

***

As I observed in my initial notification, the Special Counsel regulations provide that "the Attorney General may determine that public release of' notifications to your respective Committees "would be in the public interest." 28 C.F.R. 600.9(c). I have so determined, and I will disclose this letter to the public after delivering it to you.

Sincerely,

William P. Barr

Attorney General

(1) In assessing potential conspiracy charges, the Special Counsel also considered whether members of the Trump campaign "coordinated" with Russian election interference activities. The Special Counsel defined "coordination" as an "agreement_tacit or express_between the Trump Campaign and the Russian government on election interference."

(2) See A Sitting President's Amenability to Indictment and Criminal Prosecution, 24 Op. O.L.C. 222 (2000).

Source: NewsMax

The text of Attorney General William Barr's letter to congressional lawmakers outlining the principal conclusions reached by the special counsel in the Russia probe (with footnotes below):

March 24, 2019

Dear Chairman Graham, Chairman Nadler, Ranking Member Feinstein, and Ranking Member Collins:

As a supplement to the notification provided on Friday, March 22, 2019, I am writing today to advise you of the principal conclusions reached by Special Counsel Robert S. Mueller III and to inform you about the status of my initial review of the report he has prepared.

THE SPECIAL COUNSEL'S REPORT

On Friday, the Special Counsel submitted to me a "confidential report explaining the prosecution or declination decisions" he has reached, as required by 28 C.F.R. 600.8(c). This report is entitled "Report on the Investigation into Russian Interference in the 2016 Presidential Election." Although my review is ongoing, I believe that it is in the public interest to describe the report and to summarize the principal conclusions reached by the Special Counsel and the results of his investigation.

The report explains that the Special Counsel and his staff thoroughly investigated allegations that members of the presidential campaign of Donald J. Trump, and others associated with it, conspired with the Russian government in its efforts to interfere in the 2016 U.S. presidential election, or sought to obstruct the related federal investigations. In the report, the Special Counsel noted that, in completing his investigation, he employed 19 lawyers who were assisted by a team of approximately 40 FBI agents, intelligence analysts, forensic accountants, and other professional staff. The Special Counsel issued more than 2,800 subpoenas, executed nearly 500 search warrants, obtained more than 230 orders for communication records, issued almost 50 orders authorizing use of pen registers, made 13 requests to foreign governments for evidence, and interviewed approximately 500 witnesses.

The Special Counsel obtained a number of indictments and convictions of individuals and entities in connection with his investigation, all of which have been publicly disclosed. During the course of his investigation, the Special Counsel also referred several matters to other offices for further action. The report does not recommend any further indictments, nor did the Special Counsel obtain any sealed indictments that have yet to be made public. Below, I summarize the principal conclusions set out in the Special Counsel's report.

Russian Interference in the 2016 U.S. Presidential Election. The Special Counsel's report is divided into two parts. The first describes the results of the Special Counsel's investigation into Russia's interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election. The report outlines the Russian effort to influence the election and documents crimes committed by persons associated with the Russian government in connection with those efforts. The report further explains that a primary consideration for the Special Counsel's investigation was whether any Americans – including individuals associated with the Trump campaign – joined the Russian conspiracies to influence the election, which would be a federal crime. The Special Counsel's investigation did not find that the Trump campaign or anyone associated with it conspired or coordinated with Russia in its efforts to influence the 2016 U.S. presidential election. As the report states: "(T)he investigation did not establish that members of the Trump Campaign conspired or coordinated with the Russian government in its election interference activities." (1)

The Special Counsel's investigation determined that there were two main Russian efforts to influence the 2016 election. The first involved attempts by a Russian organization, the Internet Research Agency (IRA), to conduct disinformation and social media operations in the United States designed to sow social discord, eventually with the aim of interfering with the election. As noted above, the Special Counsel did not find that any U.S. person or Trump campaign official or associate conspired or knowingly coordinated with the IRA in its efforts, although the Special Counsel brought criminal charges against a number of Russian nationals and entities in connection with these activities.

The second element involved the Russian government's efforts to conduct computer hacking operations designed to gather and disseminate information to influence the election. The Special Counsel found that Russian government actors successfully hacked into computers and obtained emails from persons affiliated with the Clinton campaign and Democratic Party organizations, and publicly disseminated those materials through various intermediaries, including WikiLeaks. Based on these activities, the Special Counsel brought criminal charges against a number of Russian military officers for conspiring to hack into computers in the United States for purposes of influencing the election. But as noted above, the Special Counsel did not find that the Trump campaign, or anyone associated with it, conspired or coordinated with the Russian government in these efforts, despite multiple offers from Russian-affiliated individuals to assist the Trump campaign.

Obstruction of Justice. The report's second part addresses a number of actions by the President – most of which have been the subject of public reporting – that the Special Counsel investigated as potentially raising obstruction-of-justice concerns. After making a "thorough factual investigation" into these matters, the Special Counsel considered whether to evaluate the conduct under Department standards governing prosecution and declination decisions but ultimately determined not to make a traditional prosecutorial judgment. The Special Counsel therefore did not draw a conclusion – one way or the other – as to whether the examined conduct constituted obstruction. Instead, for each of the relevant actions investigated, the report sets out evidence on both sides of the question and leaves unresolved what the Special Counsel views as "difficult issues" of law and fact concerning whether the President's actions and intent could be viewed as obstruction. The Special Counsel states that "while this report does not conclude that the President committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him."

The Special Counsel's decision to describe the facts of his obstruction investigation without reaching any legal conclusions leaves it to the Attorney General to determine whether the conduct described in the report constitutes a crime. Over the course of the investigation, the Special Counsel's office engaged in discussions with certain Department officials regarding many of the legal and factual matters at issue in the Special Counsel's obstruction investigation. After reviewing the Special Counsel's final report on these issues; consulting with Department officials, including the Office of Legal Counsel; and applying the principles of federal prosecution that guide our charging decisions, Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and I have concluded that the evidence developed during the Special Counsel's investigation is not sufficient to establish that the President committed an obstruction-of-justice offense. Our determination was made without regard to, and is not based on, the constitutional considerations that surround the indictment and criminal prosecution of a sitting president. (2)

In making this determination, we noted that the Special Counsel recognized that "the evidence does not establish that the President was involved in an underlying crime related to Russian election interference," and that, while not determinative, the absence of such evidence bears upon the President's intent with respect to obstruction. Generally speaking, to obtain and sustain an obstruction conviction, the government would need to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that a person, acting with corrupt intent, engaged in obstructive conduct with a sufficient nexus to a pending or contemplated proceeding. In cataloguing the President's actions, many of which took place in public view, the report identifies no actions that, in our judgment, constitute obstructive conduct, had a nexus to a pending or contemplated proceeding, and were done with corrupt intent, each of which, under the Department's principles of federal prosecution guiding charging decisions, would need to be proven beyond a reasonable doubt to establish an obstruction-of- justice offense.

STATUS OF THE DEPARTMENT'S REVIEW

The relevant regulations contemplate that the Special Counsel's report will be a "confidential report" to the Attorney General. See Office of Special Counsel, 64 Fed. Reg. 37,038,37,040-41 (July 9,1999). As I have previously stated, however, I am mindful of the public interest in this matter. For that reason, my goal and intent is to release as much of the Special Counsel's report as I can consistent with applicable law, regulations, and Departmental policies.

Based on my discussions with the Special Counsel and my initial review, it is apparent that the report contains material that is or could be subject to Federal Rule of Criminal Procedure 6(e), which imposes restrictions on the use and disclosure of information relating to "matter(s) occurring before (a) grand jury." Fed. R. Crim. P. 6(e)(2)(B). Rule 6(e) generally limits disclosure of certain grand jury information in a criminal investigation and prosecution. Id. Disclosure of 6(e) material beyond the strict limits set forth in the rule is a crime in certain circumstances. See, e.g., 18 U.S.C. 401(3). This restriction protects the integrity of grand jury proceedings and ensures that the unique and invaluable investigative powers of a grand jury are used strictly for their intended criminal justice function.

Given these restrictions, the schedule for processing the report depends in part on how quickly the Department can identify the 6(e) material that by law cannot be made public. I have requested the assistance of the Special Counsel in identifying all 6(e) information contained in the report as quickly as possible. Separately, I also must identify any information that could impact other ongoing matters, including those that the Special Counsel has referred to other offices. As soon as that process is complete, I will be in a position to move forward expeditiously in determining what can be released in light of applicable law, regulations, and Departmental policies.

***

As I observed in my initial notification, the Special Counsel regulations provide that "the Attorney General may determine that public release of' notifications to your respective Committees "would be in the public interest." 28 C.F.R. 600.9(c). I have so determined, and I will disclose this letter to the public after delivering it to you.

Sincerely,

William P. Barr

Attorney General

(1) In assessing potential conspiracy charges, the Special Counsel also considered whether members of the Trump campaign "coordinated" with Russian election interference activities. The Special Counsel defined "coordination" as an "agreement_tacit or express_between the Trump Campaign and the Russian government on election interference."

(2) See A Sitting President's Amenability to Indictment and Criminal Prosecution, 24 Op. O.L.C. 222 (2000).

Source: NewsMax

Former FBI Director James Comey on Sunday tweeted a quixotic photo of himself gazing up into trees along with a caption that said, “so many questions,” following reports that special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation found no collusion between the Russian government and the Trump campaign.

The post came after Attorney General William Barr submitted to Congress his summary of the main conclusions from Mueller’s investigation.

Mueller did not find Trump’s campaign or associates conspired with Russia, Barr wrote, and did the special counsel did not have sufficient evidence to prosecute obstruction of justice.

“In cataloguing the President’s actions, many of which took place in public view, the (Mueller) report identifies no actions that, in our judgment, constitute obstructive conduct, had a nexus to a pending or contemplated proceeding, and were done with corrupt intent, each of which, under the Department’s principles of federal prosecution guiding charging decisions, would need to be proven beyond a reasonable doubt to establish an obstruction-of-justice offense,” Barr wrote.

Mueller, though, did not exonerate the president.

Trump, though, said the findings exonerated him.

This was an illegal takedown that failed and hopefully somebody's going to be looking at the other side," Trump told reporters on Sunday.

Mueller’s probe started in May 2017 after Trump’s sudden decision to dismiss Comey.

Source: NewsMax

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell says President Donald Trump was right about the Russia investigation.

McConnell says Attorney General William Barr's summary of special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation confirms Trump's account that there was "no effort" by his campaign "to conspire or coordinate with Russia" to influence the 2016 election.

The Republican leader said he appreciates Barr's goal of "producing as much information as possible" from Mueller's investigation. But McConnell declined to call for the report's full release, as many Democrats want.

McConnell also warned Russia's ongoing efforts to interfere in U.S. institutions "are dangerous and disturbing."

Source: NewsMax

California Sen. Kamala Harris sent a signal to the old guard of Democratic politics that every era has its end.

At an Atlanta church service Sunday, the presidential candidate compared leadership to a relay race in which each generation must ask themselves "what do we do during that period of time when we carry that baton."

Then she added with a smile that for "the older leaders, it also becomes a question of let's also know when to pass the baton."

At 54 years old, Harris is one of the younger contenders for the White House in 2020. While former Vice President Joe Biden has not said whether he will run, both the 76-year-old and 77-year-old Bernie Sanders have previously run for the White House and fallen short.

Biden and Sanders are seen as strong contenders for the Democratic nomination, though other candidates and some voters have emphasized the need for a more youthful approach to try and beat President Donald Trump in the general election. Several other candidates in the race, including two governor, are also in their late sixties.

Other highlights of Sunday campaigning:

KIRSTEN GILLIBRAND

Democratic presidential candidate Kirsten Gillibrand assailed President Donald Trump as a coward who is "tearing apart the moral fabric of the vulnerable," as she officially started her campaign for president.

The senator spoke in New York Sunday, feet away from one of Trump's signature properties, the Trump International Hotel and Tower.

She said that instead of building walls as Trump wants to do along the U.S.-Mexico border, Americans build bridges, community and hope.

Gillibrand also called for full release of special counsel Robert Mueller's report in the Russia investigation. Attorney General William Barr released a summary Sunday afternoon, but Democrats want to see the full details.

Gillibrand is trying to position herself in the crowded field of Democrats seeking the party's nomination. While some hopefuls have shied away from mentioning Trump, Gillibrand has not hesitated to do so.

ELIZABETH WARREN

Sen. Elizabeth Warren said Sunday the National Rifle Association is holding "Congress hostage" when it comes to stemming gun violence.

The Massachusetts senator and Democratic presidential candidate tells a campaign rally that if seven children were dying from a mysterious virus, "we'd pull out all the stops till we figured out what was wrong." But in terms of gun violence, she said the NRA "keeps calling the shots in Washington."

Warren finished a two-day campaign trip to New Hampshire with an event at a middle school in Conway Sunday afternoon.

Warren focused much of her speech on her approach to economics, but paid special attention to unions Sunday. She said more power needs to be put back in the hands of workers.

BETO O'ROURKE

Democratic presidential candidate Beto O'Rourke told voters in Las Vegas Sunday that President Donald Trump bears blame for the separation of families at the U.S.-Mexico border but responsibility lies with everyone in the country to fix the situation.

O'Rourke spoke Sunday to more than 200 people packed into and snaking around a taco shop on the city's north end. He said immigrant families are leaving their home countries and journeying on foot because they have no other choice.

The former Texas congressman said desperate families were broken up in the U.S. when they were at their most vulnerable and desperate moments, and what happened to them "is on every single one of us."

Source: NewsMax

California Sen. Kamala Harris sent a signal to the old guard of Democratic politics that every era has its end.

At an Atlanta church service Sunday, the presidential candidate compared leadership to a relay race in which each generation must ask themselves "what do we do during that period of time when we carry that baton."

Then she added with a smile that for "the older leaders, it also becomes a question of let's also know when to pass the baton."

At 54 years old, Harris is one of the younger contenders for the White House in 2020. While former Vice President Joe Biden has not said whether he will run, both the 76-year-old and 77-year-old Bernie Sanders have previously run for the White House and fallen short.

Biden and Sanders are seen as strong contenders for the Democratic nomination, though other candidates and some voters have emphasized the need for a more youthful approach to try and beat President Donald Trump in the general election. Several other candidates in the race, including two governor, are also in their late sixties.

Other highlights of Sunday campaigning:

KIRSTEN GILLIBRAND

Democratic presidential candidate Kirsten Gillibrand assailed President Donald Trump as a coward who is "tearing apart the moral fabric of the vulnerable," as she officially started her campaign for president.

The senator spoke in New York Sunday, feet away from one of Trump's signature properties, the Trump International Hotel and Tower.

She said that instead of building walls as Trump wants to do along the U.S.-Mexico border, Americans build bridges, community and hope.

Gillibrand also called for full release of special counsel Robert Mueller's report in the Russia investigation. Attorney General William Barr released a summary Sunday afternoon, but Democrats want to see the full details.

Gillibrand is trying to position herself in the crowded field of Democrats seeking the party's nomination. While some hopefuls have shied away from mentioning Trump, Gillibrand has not hesitated to do so.

ELIZABETH WARREN

Sen. Elizabeth Warren said Sunday the National Rifle Association is holding "Congress hostage" when it comes to stemming gun violence.

The Massachusetts senator and Democratic presidential candidate tells a campaign rally that if seven children were dying from a mysterious virus, "we'd pull out all the stops till we figured out what was wrong." But in terms of gun violence, she said the NRA "keeps calling the shots in Washington."

Warren finished a two-day campaign trip to New Hampshire with an event at a middle school in Conway Sunday afternoon.

Warren focused much of her speech on her approach to economics, but paid special attention to unions Sunday. She said more power needs to be put back in the hands of workers.

BETO O'ROURKE

Democratic presidential candidate Beto O'Rourke told voters in Las Vegas Sunday that President Donald Trump bears blame for the separation of families at the U.S.-Mexico border but responsibility lies with everyone in the country to fix the situation.

O'Rourke spoke Sunday to more than 200 people packed into and snaking around a taco shop on the city's north end. He said immigrant families are leaving their home countries and journeying on foot because they have no other choice.

The former Texas congressman said desperate families were broken up in the U.S. when they were at their most vulnerable and desperate moments, and what happened to them "is on every single one of us."

Source: NewsMax

President Donald Trump has every right to be angry he was "being investigated for a crime that never happened" by "people who hate him," the president's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani said Sunday.

In remarks on Fox News' "America's News HQ," Giuliani called for an investigation now "to figure out where did the charge emanate?"

"I can see why he would be upset and the president has told me numerous times no other president should ever have to go through this," Giuliani said. "I think there has to be a full and complete investigation to figure out where did the charge emanate, who started it and who paid for it?"

According to Giuliani, the Mueller report summary released by Attorney General William Barr on Sunday "was [a] far better report than I expected."

He also directed a message to Democrats in the wake of special counsel Robert Mueller's determination there was no collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

"I would just say to them, please think about the country no matter how much you like or dislike the president, agree or disagree with policies," he said. "He has been unfairly treated with regard to collusion, certainly they have to see that and all what they are trying to do now is completely political and I hope some of them, I put out a tweet saying I hope that [Rep. Adam] Schiff [D-Calif.] and a couple of others apologize."

In an interview with CNN, Giuliani called for the public release of Mueller's full report.

"Sure," he said when asked about releasing the full report. "We would all like it to happen, because if it doesn't happen, somebody is going to say there is something in there."

Source: NewsMax

President Donald Trump has every right to be angry he was "being investigated for a crime that never happened" by "people who hate him," the president's personal lawyer Rudy Giuliani said Sunday.

In remarks on Fox News' "America's News HQ," Giuliani called for an investigation now "to figure out where did the charge emanate?"

"I can see why he would be upset and the president has told me numerous times no other president should ever have to go through this," Giuliani said. "I think there has to be a full and complete investigation to figure out where did the charge emanate, who started it and who paid for it?"

According to Giuliani, the Mueller report summary released by Attorney General William Barr on Sunday "was [a] far better report than I expected."

He also directed a message to Democrats in the wake of special counsel Robert Mueller's determination there was no collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

"I would just say to them, please think about the country no matter how much you like or dislike the president, agree or disagree with policies," he said. "He has been unfairly treated with regard to collusion, certainly they have to see that and all what they are trying to do now is completely political and I hope some of them, I put out a tweet saying I hope that [Rep. Adam] Schiff [D-Calif.] and a couple of others apologize."

In an interview with CNN, Giuliani called for the public release of Mueller's full report.

"Sure," he said when asked about releasing the full report. "We would all like it to happen, because if it doesn't happen, somebody is going to say there is something in there."

Source: NewsMax

Democrats are jumping on Attorney General William Barr's summary of the Mueller report in a letter to Congress that its findings were inconclusive on whether President Donald Trump obstructed justice as justification to proceed with their own investigation, Politico reported Sunday.

"This letter leaves more questions than answers; a sanitized summary from Trump's handpicked bodyguard is not acceptable," Rep. Bill Pascrell, D-N.J., said. "Barr has his finger on the scale to protect Trump. The full report should be released immediately."

His Democratic colleague in the House, Rep. David Cicilline, D-R.I., added "according to the Attorney General's letter, he described a pattern of evidence suggesting the president engaged in obstruction of justice," Politico reported

Barr wrote in his letter to the Congress that "The report sets out evidence on both sides of the question and leaves unresolved what the special counsel views as 'difficult issues' of law and fact concerning whether the president's actions and intent could be viewed as obstruction."

Barr added Mueller stated in his final report that "while this report does not conclude that the president committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him."

Source: NewsMax

President Donald Trump sent out a tweet claiming "total exoneration" Sunday immediately after Attorney General William Barr sent a letter to Congress saying special counsel Robert Mueller did not uncover evidence the Trump campaign conspired or coordinated with the Russian government to interfere in the 2016 presidential election.

"No Collusion, No Obstruction, Complete and Total EXONERATION. KEEP AMERICA GREAT!," the president wrote.

Quoting the official Mueller report, Barr wrote to Congress that "The special counsel did not establish that members of the Trump campaign conspired or coordinated with the Russian government in its election interference activities."

On the topic of potential obstruction of justice on the part of Trump, Mueller referred the question of criminality to the attorney general.

"While this report does not conclude the president committed a crime, it does not exonerate him," Barr wrote, quoting the report.

Source: NewsMax

While spending the weekend with President Donald Trump at Mar-a-Lago, Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., celebrated the results of special counsel Robert Mueller's report with a series of tweets, saying it was a "bad day for those hoping [the report] would take President Trump down."

"I have just received topline findings from Attorney General [William] Barr. Good day for the rule of law. Great day for President Trump and his team. No collusion and no obstruction. The cloud hanging over President Trump has been removed by this report.

"Bad day for those hoping the Mueller investigation would take President Trump down.

"Great job by Mr. Mueller and his team to thoroughly examine all things Russia. Now it is time to move on, govern the country, and get ready to combat Russia and other foreign actors ahead of 2020."

Source: NewsMax

Celebrating "no collusion and no obstruction" as reported by Attorney General William Barr's summary of special counsel Robert Mueller's report, President Donald Trump claimed "complete and total exoneration."

"Collusion, the most ridiculous thing I have ever heard," President Trump told the media before boarding Air Force One, leaving Florida's Mar-a-Lago during a weekend away from the White House. "No collusion and no obstruction.

"Complete and total exoneration." 

President Trump called the witch hunt of his administration and campaign "an illegal takedown that failed."

"It's a shame our country has had to go through this," he said. "It is a shame your president had to go through this."

President Trump also expressed hope "the other side of this" will be investigated, suggesting potential investigative abuses of FISA warrants and investigating the political opposition.

"The president was totally vindicated," Trump attorney Rudy Giuliani told Fox News after Trump's statement to the media. "And investigation by people who hate him."

Source: NewsMax

Democrat commentator Donna Brazile said Sunday that U.S. voters should "celebrate" that special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation determined "the Russians had no help from Americans” during the 2016 election.

In remarks on Fox News regarding Attorney General William Barr's release Sunday of a summary of the Mueller probe, Brazile, who has served as chair of the National Democratic Committee and now works as a Fox commentator, said she hopes, however, Americans will take time to "absorb" the news.

"We have to evaluate," she said.

"We were told just a few minutes ago what was in the report, we have not seen any of the summaries," she cautioned. "I mean, I want to believe when I heard . . . the Russians had no help from Americans. I want to believe that because I understand Mr. Mueller interviewed 500 people, had 2,900 subpoenas, I want to believe that that occurred.

"And I trust the fact because I have never spent one day on air criticizing the Justice Department, the president has," she continued.

"All I'm asking is give the American people opportunity to absorb the information."

She also said "democracy today is still on trial."

"As our president, [Donald Trump] needs to understand that this rises above just himself and his party but it calls upon us as Americans to look at ourselves and say, 'OK, the Russians were at it, they did not get us.'

"But the president of the United States now needs to understand that our democracy must be protected, if he's able to do that, then the victory, his victory, it is our victory because we have to protect our country."

Source: NewsMax

Democrat commentator Donna Brazile said Sunday that U.S. voters should "celebrate" that special counsel Robert Mueller's investigation determined "the Russians had no help from Americans” during the 2016 election.

In remarks on Fox News regarding Attorney General William Barr's release Sunday of a summary of the Mueller probe, Brazile, who has served as chair of the National Democratic Committee and now works as a Fox commentator, said she hopes, however, Americans will take time to "absorb" the news.

"We have to evaluate," she said.

"We were told just a few minutes ago what was in the report, we have not seen any of the summaries," she cautioned. "I mean, I want to believe when I heard . . . the Russians had no help from Americans. I want to believe that because I understand Mr. Mueller interviewed 500 people, had 2,900 subpoenas, I want to believe that that occurred.

"And I trust the fact because I have never spent one day on air criticizing the Justice Department, the president has," she continued.

"All I'm asking is give the American people opportunity to absorb the information."

She also said "democracy today is still on trial."

"As our president, [Donald Trump] needs to understand that this rises above just himself and his party but it calls upon us as Americans to look at ourselves and say, 'OK, the Russians were at it, they did not get us.'

"But the president of the United States now needs to understand that our democracy must be protected, if he's able to do that, then the victory, his victory, it is our victory because we have to protect our country."

Source: NewsMax

The chairman of the U.S. House of Representatives Judiciary Committee, Jerry Nadler, said on Sunday his panel would call Attorney General William Barr to testify shortly, citing concerns over Barr's conclusions from Special Counsel Robert Mueller's Russia probe report.

"In light of the very concerning discrepancies and final decision making at the Justice Department following the Special Counsel report, where Mueller did not exonerate the President, we will be calling Attorney General Barr in to testify before @HouseJudiciary in the near future," Nadler said on Twitter.

Source: NewsMax

White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said on Sunday the Department of Justice's findings on the probe into Russian interference in the 2016 election were a "total and complete exoneration of the President of the United States."

Special Counsel Robert Mueller, who spent nearly two years investigating allegations that Russia meddled in the presidential election to help Donald Trump win, found no evidence that any member of Trump's election campaign conspired with Russia during the election.

Source: NewsMax

If special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation found no collusion between President Donald Trump’s campaign and Russia, House Democrats won’t either, a former campaign adviser said Sunday.

In an interview on CNN’s “State of the Union,” Michael Caputo, who served as a political adviser to Trump’s campaign in late 2015 and early 2016, said he’s “relieved” the Mueller probe is now over.

“I’m one of dozens of witnesses who have gone through this and as just a witness, I’m going to be able to press play as soon as this is all out there,” he declared.

Caputo, who angrily called for “an investigation of the investigators” last year, lamented Sunday his family “had our lives on pause for two years” — and added that he lost both his home and business.

He added that his testimony before congressional committees was nothing in comparison to with working with the Mueller’s investigators, whom he called “the most impressive array of investigatory talent the American government has assembled in the 21st century.”

“I don’t care what the House Democrats want to go after from here forward, if Mueller can’t find it, they’re not going to find it,” he said.

Source: NewsMax

President Donald Trump's tweet on withdrawal of North Korea sanctions was unprecedented and "shouldn't have happened that way," according to Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla.

"I've never seen that before from this or any administration, so something happened here," Sen. Rubio told NBC's "Meet the Press" on Sunday.

Undoing sanctions requires "a long interagency process," Rubio told host Chuck Todd, adding President Trump acting unilaterally is "unusual" and unprecedented.

"Frankly, look, I think people around the world would look at it and say from now on, when they hear about sanctions, they're going to ask for a double confirmation from the White House," Rubio told Todd.

"So, look, I wish it hadn't happened that way, and it shouldn't have happened that way."

The Treasury Department announced large scale sanctions against North Korea for their nuclear weapons program, but President Trump quickly tweeted a revocation of them shortly after Friday:

"It was announced today by the U.S. Treasury that additional large scale sanctions would be added to those already existing sanctions on North Korea. I have today ordered the withdrawal of those additional sanctions!"

Rubio's rejection of President Trump's work to denuclearize North Korea, negotiating with Kim Jong Un is based on skepticism on the part of Kim, not any doubt about Trump. 

"I would love for Kim Jong Un to give up his weapons and everything else," Rubio said. "And I don't criticize the president for trying. I just never believed he would. I don't believe he ever will.

"I'm not skeptical because I want it to fail; I'm skeptical because I believe it will fail."

Source: NewsMax

Long a critic of Democratic investigations and special counsel Robert Mueller, Rep. Devin Nunes, R-Calif., does not care about the impending report, "just burn it up," he said.

"I don't really care what the Mueller report says, because the Mueller special counsel should have never been appointed," Nunes told Fox News' "Fox & Friends" on Sunday. "And I say that and we can take any part of this investigation and we can show you how fraudulent it is."

Nunes, the former chairman of the House Intelligencer Committee when Republicans were in leadership, rejected the search for 2016 election meddling collusion between Russia and President Donald Trump's campaign as "all a lie and a myth."

"You know, we can just burn it up," he said. "I mean, it is a partisan document, so there is going to be a lot of calls for that."

Nunes also ripped Democrats for obstruction in the House investigations into the political witch hunt of the Republican president on the basis of Democratic partisanship in Obama Justice Department.

"What we really need to see is what was the FBI's involvement with Fusion GPS," Nunes said. "I don't want to gloss over this for the viewers but Fusion GPS was essentially the Hillary Clinton campaign. They were hired by the Clinton campaign, so we need to see all of that and need the FISA fully disclosed.

"We need everyone that Mueller talked to, including his interactions with Jerome Corsi who you just had on the show."

Nunes' point with Corsi was investigators were leveraging a member of the media who was supportive of the president, and had no actual campaign ties. Regardless of whether he had spoken with WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange, it was not a crime.

Stifling the opposing political party supporters is not rooting out collusion, but violating free speech, Nunes said.

Source: NewsMax

Executive privilege cannot be used to hide wrongdoing and any attempt by the White House and President Donald Trump to block parts of special counsel Robert Mueller's report from Congress or the public would not be "right" nor "successful," according to House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y.

"The president must personally assert executive privilege, and I do not believe it exists here at all because, as we learned from the [former President Richard] Nixon tapes case, executive privilege cannot be used to hide wrongdoing," Nadler told NBC's "Meet the Press."

". . . The president may try to assert it, may try to hide things behind it, but I don't think that's right or [would] be successful."

Rep. Nadler referred to the unanimous 1974 Supreme Court ruling on the Nixon tapes that rejected executive privilege overriding the judicial process.

President Trump has reportedly weighed using executive privilege to review classified material not related to any indictment legal proceeding, merely the public release of potentially politicized material that is not used in review criminality.

"Congress must get all the information and the evidence that the Department of Justice may have in order to exercise our function of being able to hold the president accountable," Nadler told host Chuck Todd. "If we don't do that, if we can't do that the president is effectively above the law."

Source: NewsMax

Rep. Adam Schiff, D-Calif., on Sunday did not rule out an impeachment of President Donald Trump — but said it would depend on “overwhelming evidence of criminality.”

In an interview on ABC News’ "This Week," Schiff, the chairman of the House Intelligence Committee, qualified his remarks to the San Francisco Chronicle that if there’s no bombshell in the final report of special counsel Robert Mueller report, there’d be no impeachment.

"Not necessarily,” Schiff said Sunday.  “Because… [the Department of Justice]  can't indict the president. That's their policy. And therefore there could be overwhelming evidence on the obstruction issue [in the Mueller report]. And I don't know if that's the case, but if there were overwhelming evidence of criminality on the president's part, then the Congress would need to consider that remedy if indictment is foreclosed."

Schiff also pushed back at GOP claims saying declarations of vindication for Trump in the completed Mueller probe are wrong.

Trump’s allies have “been saying with each indictment that it's a vindication,” he said. “About six people close to the president have been indicted. That hardly looks like vindication to me.”

He also called it a “mistake” for Mueller to have not interviewed the president before ending the investigation.

“It was a mistake to rely on written responses by the president,” he said.That is generally more what the lawyer has to say than what the individual has to say. I can certainly understand why the lawyers like [Rudy] Giuliani were fighting this, because the president is someone who seems pathologically incapable of telling the truth for long periods of time.

Related Stories:

Source: NewsMax

Congressional Democrats “intend to impeach” President Donald Trump — and “don’t care about the evidence,” Sen. Ted Cruz, R-Texas, said Sunday.

In an interview on CNN’s “State of the Union,” Cruz, though critical of the now-completed investigation of special counsel Robert Mueller, said House Democrats  have another agenda.

What they are basically saying is they are going to impeach the president for being Donald Trump. And they don't care about the evidence,” he said.

Cruz said if it remains true that “not a single person was indicted for colluding with the Russians to influence the 2016 election — that’s goodness for the American people.”

“I'm concerned that it may have become a fishing expedition,” he said of the Mueller probe.

“Bob Mueller made a serious mistake when he brought together the team of investigators and lawyers and selected so many partisan Democrats who had been longtime Democratic donors,” he said. “I think that was unfortunate because by doing that, it undermined the credibility and impartiality of the special counsel's office.”

Related Stories:

Source: NewsMax

In an early look at hypothetical 2020 presidential election fields, both former Vice President Joe Biden and Sen. Bernie Sanders, I-Vt., lead President Donald Trump head-to-head, according to Fox News.

Biden leads President Trump in a hypothetical by 7 percentage points (47-40 percent), the voters polled leading candidate. The only other Democrat to lead President Trump in a hypothetic campaign was Sen. Sanders (3 percentage points, 44-4 percent), according to the other poll results.

The poll's leading candidates to win the Democratic primary:

  1. Biden – 31 percent.
  2. Sanders – 23 percent.
  3. Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif. – 8 percent.
  4. Former Rep. Beto O'Rourke, D-Texas – 8 percent.
  5. Sen. Cory Booker, D-N.J. – 4 percent.
  6. Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass. – 4 percent.
  7. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y. – 2 percent.
  8. All other candidates are 1 percent or less.

Among the candidates above, only Biden has yet to officially announce his candidacy.

The Fox News poll surveyed 1,002 registered voters – including 403 Democratic primary voters – from March 17-20 with a margin of error of plus or minus 3 percentage points.

Source: NewsMax

Democrats are pressing for full disclosure of special counsel Robert Mueller's report on the Russia investigation and vowing to use subpoena powers and other legal means if necessary to get it.

Attorney General William Barr was expected to release his first summary of Mueller's findings on Sunday, people familiar with the process said, on what lawmakers anticipated could be a day of reckoning in the two-year probe into President Donald Trump and Russian efforts to elect him. Since receiving the report Friday, Barr has been deciding how much of it Congress and the public will see.

Democrats are on a hair trigger over the prospect that some information may be withheld.

"I suspect that we'll find those words of transparency to prove hollow, that in fact they will fight to make sure that Congress doesn't get this underlying evidence," Rep. Adam Schiff of California, chairman of the House intelligence committee, said on ABC's "This Week."

His plan: Ask for information and if that's denied, "subpoena. If subpoenas are denied, we will haul people before the Congress. And yes, we will prosecute in court as necessary to get this information."

At his resort in Florida, Trump stirred from an unusual, nearly two-day silence on Twitter with the anodyne tweet Sunday morning: "Good Morning, Have a Great Day!" Then followed up: "MAKE AMERICA GREAT AGAIN!"

Democratic Rep. Jerrold Nadler, chairman of the House Judiciary Committee, said Democrats won't be willing to wait long for the Justice Department to hand over full information on the probe into whether Trump's 2016 campaign coordinated with Russia to sway the election and whether the president later sought to obstruct the investigation.

"It won't be months," he said on CNN's "State of the Union."

Asked if he still believes Trump obstructed justice, he indicated there has been obstruction but "whether it's criminal is another question."

Barr and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who appointed Mueller and oversaw much of his work, analyzed the report on Saturday, laboring to condense it into a summary letter of main conclusions.

The Russia investigation has shadowed Trump for nearly two years and has ensnared his family and close advisers. And no matter the findings in Mueller's report, the probe already has illuminated Russia's assault on the American political system, painted the Trump campaign as eager to exploit the release of hacked Democratic emails to hurt Democrat Hillary Clinton and exposed lies by Trump aides aimed at covering up their Russia-related contacts.

Barr has said he wants to release as much as he can under the law. That decision will require him to weigh the Justice Department's longstanding protocol of not releasing negative information about people who aren't indicted against the extraordinary public interest in a criminal investigation into the president and his campaign.

Democrats are citing the department's recent precedent of norm-breaking disclosures, including during the Clinton email investigation, to argue that they're entitled to Mueller's entire report and the underlying evidence he collected.

Even with the details still under wraps, Friday's end to the 22-month probe without additional indictments by Mueller was welcome news to some in Trump's orbit who had feared a final round of charges could target more Trump associates or members of the president's family.

The White House sought to keep its distance, saying Sunday it had not been briefed on the report. Trump, who has relentlessly criticized Mueller's investigation as a "witch hunt," went golfing Saturday and was uncharacteristically quiet on Twitter. Not so one of his guests, musician Kid Rock, who posted a picture with the president and the tweet, "Another great day on the links!" He added: "What a great man, so down to earth and so fun to be with!!"

The conclusion of Mueller's investigation does not remove legal peril for the president.

He faces a separate Justice Department investigation in New York into hush money payments during the campaign to two women who say they had sex with him years before the election. He's also been implicated in a potential campaign finance violation by his former lawyer, Michael Cohen, who says Trump asked him to arrange the transactions. Federal prosecutors, also in New York, have been investigating foreign contributions made to the president's inaugural committee.

As for Mueller, absent the report's details it was not known whether he concluded the campaign colluded with the Kremlin to tip the election in favor of the celebrity businessman. A Justice Department official did confirm that Mueller was not recommending any further indictments, meaning the investigation had ended without any public charges of a criminal conspiracy, or of obstruction of justice by the president.

In a letter to the Republican and Democratic leaders of the congressional judiciary committees, Barr noted on Friday that the department had not denied any request from Mueller, something Barr would have been required to disclose to ensure there was no political interference. Trump was never interviewed in person by Mueller's team, but submitted answers to questions in writing.

In a conference call Saturday about next steps, Delaware Sen. Chris Coons, a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, issued a warning for his fellow Democrats, some of whom have pinned high political hopes on Mueller's findings: "Once we get the principal conclusions of the report, I think it's entirely possible that that will be a good day for the president and his core supporters."

A number of Trump associates and family members have been dogged by speculation of possible wrongdoing. Among them are Donald Trump Jr., who helped arrange a Trump Tower meeting at the height of the 2016 campaign with a Kremlin-linked lawyer, and Trump's son-in-law, Jared Kushner, who was interviewed at least twice by Mueller's prosecutors.

All told, Mueller charged 34 people, including the president's former campaign chairman, Paul Manafort, his first national security adviser, Michael Flynn, and three Russian companies. Twenty-five Russians were indicted on charges related to election interference, accused either of hacking Democratic email accounts during the campaign or of orchestrating a social media campaign that spread disinformation on the internet.

Five Trump aides pleaded guilty and agreed to cooperate with Mueller and a sixth, longtime confidant Roger Stone, is awaiting trial on charges that he lied to Congress and engaged in witness tampering.

Peter Carr, spokesman for the special counsel, said Saturday that the case of former Trump campaign aide Rick Gates will be handed off to the U.S. attorney for the District of Columbia. Gates was a key cooperator in Mueller's probe and court papers show he continues to help with several other federal investigations.

Justice Department legal opinions have held that sitting presidents may not be indicted. But many Democrats say Trump should not be immune from a public accounting of his behavior. Though the department typically does not disclose negative information about people who are not indicted, officials have at times broken from that protocol.

Former FBI Director James Comey famously held a July 2016 news conference in which he criticized Clinton as "extremely careless" in her use of a private email server but said the FBI would not recommend charges. The Justice Department also took the extraordinary step of making available to lawmakers the details of a secret surveillance warrant obtained on a Trump campaign aide in the early days of the Russia probe.

Source: NewsMax

House Democrats don’t think special counsel Robert Mueller’s final report is the “bombshell they anticipated” — and have pivoted to conducting their own probes of President Donald Trump, Rep. Jim Jordan, R-Ohio, said Sunday.

In an interview on ABC News’ “This Week,” Jordan said “we haven’t seen any” indication of the “central charge of the special counsel … to see if this was conspiracy, coordination, or collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia to impact the election.”

“They don't think this Mueller report is going to be the bombshell they anticipated,” he said of House Democrats. “Now they're launching other charges, other investigations.”

He also chided Democrats for clamoring for Mueller to head the nearly two year investigation.

“Remember, this is Bob Mueller — the guy the Democrats, the Republicans, everyone in town said, ‘this is the guy we need to pick. He can almost walk on water. He's right next to Jesus. This is the guy,’” he said.

“But all indications are that there is not going to be any finding of any collusion whatsoever,” he said.

Source: NewsMax

Democrats complaining about special counsel Robert Mueller's lack of authority to indict the president as the reason there are no more indictments coming are ignoring "the logical conclusion: There was no collusion," according to Rep. Doug Collins, R-Ga.

"At this point the president has been proved right," Rep. Collins, the ranking member of the House Judiciary Committee, told "Fox News Sunday" of "no collusion" and "witch hunt" claims by President Donald Trump. "I think he was obviously frustrated during this time, and rightfully so, as this report seems to show."

Democrats have long argued the special counsel would get to the bottom of 2016 election meddling after President Trump's victory, which has been delegitimized in the eyes of some Democrats. But continuing House Democrat investigations post-special counsel suggest it was never going to be enough to vindicate the president in their partisan view.

"In their main core of the collusion or investigation of obstruction, they're seemingly coming to the point that the president and those around him had nothing to do with this," Collins told host Chris Wallace. "That is the core finding at least in what we’re seeing so far."

As far as Democrats trying to "paint the president" by pointing to the indictments delivered thus far by Mueller's team – including Paul Manafort, Roger Stone, Michael Flynn – they also prove nothing, according to Collins.

"I just think it shows you've got three people who chose to lie to investigators when nobody told them to lie to investigators as far as anything has been pointed out," Collins told Wallace. "If this report comes back – as it seems to be coming back – that there was no collusion on the president or the part of the campaign, then that is the part that we need to take and move from here.

"Why people lie, Chris, that’s a discussion for them and their lawyers and why they chose to do that."

Source: NewsMax

Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla., said Sunday he wants to "see all" of special counsel Robert Mueller’s report on Trump campaign collusion, including what was behind the FBI’s "extraordinary use of government surveillance power."

In an interview on NBC News’ "Meet the Press," Rubio, a member of the Senate Intelligence Committee, said "we want to learn as much as we possible can that’s allowed and permissible" under Justice Department policy and "of course, the law."

"I want to see all of it, what was the underlying criminal predicate for the entire investigation," he said. "Let's see the [Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act] investigations because this is an extraordinary use of government surveillance power…. Show us what those were."

"Let's see all of that and put all of that out there so we can pass judgment about how the investigation was conducted or at least the predicate for the investigation was conducted during the Obama years," he added.

According to Rubio, the completion of the the Mueller report now also means the intel committee can question people that it has wanted to interview for its own probe.

"The end means there should nobody out there, and there shouldn't be anyone out there that we shouldn't be allowed to interview … There's no reason for anyone to not talk to us," he said.

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Source: NewsMax

Regardless of the revelations of special counsel Robert Mueller's report, the reality is former FBI Director James Comey knew Russia was meddling in the 2016 presidential election and did "nothing" because he "thought Hillary [Clinton] would win the election," according to retired Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, D-Nev.

"In the last Congress that I served in, I wrote a letter in August to the director of the FBI Comey and said 'Russia is meddling with our elections and you need to do something about that' and by October he had done nothing," Reid told "The Cats Roundtable" on 970 AM-N.Y., per The Hill.

"The hindsight from his troops are 'well he didn't do it because he thought Hillary would win the election. He therefore thought it'd be too political for him to get involved."

Reid added to host John Catsimatidis, Russia's meddling campaigns might have been exposed, but they are not yet curtailed or stopped.

"The Russians interfered with our elections," Reid said. "They've done it in the past. They're doing it as we speak in European countries, and they're going to do it again in America."

Comey criticism is not unusual from Reid, who has long blamed Clinton's loss on Comey's actions and inaction on Russia's election meddling.

Source: NewsMax

The letter from Attorney General William Barr sent to Congress "shows that the Russia collusion investigation is exactly what President Trump always said it was – a witch hunt," former Gov. Mike Huckabee, R-Ark., wrote for RealClear Politics.

It will not be just a function of what is in special counsel Robert Mueller's report, but we should not be "overlooking the significance of what's not in it," according to Huckabee.

"Not one of the Democrats' high-value targets — Donald Trump Jr., Jared Kushner, or any other Trump family members — were indicted by Mueller, and the Department of Justice has already said there will be no more indictments forthcoming," Huckabee wrote.

"Of course, Mueller didn't subpoena the president, either, crushing the hopes of the mainstream media journalists and pundits who had been confidently expecting that very outcome from the start of Mueller's probe. If President Trump really was an agent of Russia, as they fervently believe he is, then surely Mueller would have taken the added step of at least interviewing him before ending the investigation.

"Among those who were indicted in the Mueller investigation, moreover, not one was charged with conspiring with Russia to fix the 2016 election – the entire purpose of assigning a special counsel."

Huckabee also noted the fact the special counsel's investigation has concluded on its own volition, meaning "President Trump did a lousy job" of obstructing it or justice.

"Here we are, two years and $30-plus million in taxpayer funds later, and nothing to show for it, except some completely discredited media commentators and partisan members of Congress who breathlessly all but guaranteed there would be evidence of the president and members of his family and staff colluding with the Russians," Huckabee wrote. "I won't hold my breath for their admissions and apologies.

". . . With the Mueller witch hunt behind him, perhaps now the President Trump can finally focus his full attention on the job that the American people elected him to do: making America great again."

Source: NewsMax

In the first major speech of her presidential campaign Sunday, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., is set to deliver a rebuke of the U.S. president as a "coward," according to notes obtained by AP and Reuters.

The speech is set at the front of Manhattan's Trump International Hotel & Tower, which she will call "a shrine to greed, division and vanity," according to AP.

"We're bringing the fight to Trump’s doorstep," the event's page reads.

Unlike some of the 2020 Democratic presidential primary candidates, Sen. Gillibrand has not been shy to call President Donald Trump by name.

"President Trump is tearing apart the moral fabric of our country," she plans to say, Reuters reported, per The Hill. "He demonizes the vulnerable and he punches down. He puts his name in bold on every building.

"He does all of this because he wants you to believe he is strong. He is not. Our president is a coward."

Sen. Gillibrand's campaign platform will call for universal healthcare, paid family leave, and gun control.

In her remarks for Sunday, Gillibrand praises the bravery of high school students organizing to end gun violence, young people brought to the country illegally as children who are fighting for "their right to call this country home," and "of course, the formerly well-behaved women who organized, ran for office, voted and won in 2018."

"That is brave," she says.

Gillibrand also talks about her own courage, which she says is evidenced by her ability to win a House seat in a district seen as a Republican stronghold, by fighting for funds to cover the cost of medical care for rescue workers and survivors of the 2001 attack on the World Trade Center, and by fighting on behalf of survivors of sexual assault and harassment at the Pentagon, in Congress and on college campuses.

Information from the AP was used in this report.

Source: NewsMax

Author David Horowitz compared Democrats to Satan in an interview Saturday night, saying they have the same "arrogance" as the serpent did in the Garden of Eden.

Horowitz, whose latest book is "Dark Agenda: The War to Destroy Christian America," was on "Huckabee" and did not hold back on his criticisms of the American left.

"What did the serpent say to Adam and Eve? 'If you eat of that tree, you shall be as God.' Every leftist has that arrogance," Horowitz told host Mike Huckabee.

"They think they can remake the world. Just look at the Green New Deal that this idiot woman is proposing."

The Green New Deal was introduced by freshman Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, D-N.Y. The legislation proposed drastic changes to how Americans live, from the cars they drive, the airplanes in which they fly, and healthcare. The ideas have estimated costs of up to nearly $100 trillion, and conservatives have ridiculed them — Horowitz included.

"You couldn't get rid of gasoline cars without instituting a police state," he told Huckabee. "And believe me, they will have no compunction about doing it. Don't call it socialism, it's communism. That's who they are."

Regarding recent developments at the state-level regarding abortion, including a New York law that allows late-term abortions and discussion in Virginia about post-birth abortions, Horowitz was even more appalled.

"Even though I know how evil the left is — they talk a good line, they're very seductive, but so is the serpent — I never thought I'd live to see the day when they would pass laws, the Democrats, to kill children who have already been born. This is so inhumane," he said.

Source: NewsMax

Without a mention of John McCain after breaking from the president's criticism of his late friend, Sen. Lindsey Graham delivered loyalty and laughs in a light-hearted, GOP fundraiser speech Friday as President Donald Trump looked on, Politico reported.

"If Lindsey's speaking, I want to come down here for two reasons," President Trump said, per a video posted by a Politico reporter. "No. 1: He's a great speaker; and No. 2, I know if I'm here, he's not going to say anything bad about me."

The media was shut out of attending the annual Lincoln Day Dinner, a Palm Beach County Republican Party fundraiser, per the report. President Trump had not planned to attend, but he did announce Sen. Graham after having dinner with the first lady Melania and his son Barron, according to attendees.

"We found a lot in common: I like him and he likes him," a jovial Graham joked in a light-hearted speech, those in attendance told Politico.

Among the other one-liners from Graham, who spoke "off the cuff," according to Graham spokesman Kevin Bishop:

  • On hailing the move of the U.S. Embassy from Tel Aviv to Jerusalem: "There will be a Trump hotel there in 10 years," he cracked.
  • Graham jokingly asked the crowd if they wanted to see former Rep. Trey Gowdy, R-S.C., on the Supreme Court. Gowdy was in attendance and "mingling with the president," according to Politico.
  • After the crowd started a "lock her up" chant about Hillary Clinton, Graham quipped: "Don't lock her up! We want her to run again."

"Pretty typical Lindsey," one attendee told Politico of the 30-minute speech, which President Trump arrived for and left when it was done.

The following from the Trump inner-circle and Florida GOP were in attendance, per the report.

  • Emcee ex-Florida Attorney General Pam Bondi.
  • Donald Trump Jr. and girlfriend Kimberly Guilfoyle.
  • Florida Lt. Gov Jeanette Núñez.
  • Rep. Brian Mast, R-Fla.
  • Former Rep. Mark Foley, R-Fla.
  • Republican National Committee co-chair Tommy Hicks, Jr.
  • Conservative activist James O'Keefe.

One topic that was not broached, as the Mueller report was delivered to the Justice Department, was the Russia investigation.

"Nobody mentioned anything, other than all of us saw our phones and knew the report dropped," an attendee told Politico.

Source: NewsMax

Congressional Democrats are plotting strategy as they await the conclusions of Robert Mueller's now-completed Russia investigation, with senior lawmakers demanding full transparency and preparing for next steps if the results are favorable to President Donald Trump.

House Democrats planned meetings by phone on Saturday to share what they know about the probe and to discuss how to move forward. It was unclear how soon they will have more information from Attorney General William Barr, who received the report from Mueller on Friday and has notified Congress that he intends to share its "principal conclusions" soon.

The Justice Department told lawmakers that Barr's summary was not expected Saturday but could still come over the weekend, according to multiple people familiar with the notification. The people requested anonymity to discuss the private message from the Justice Department.

The conclusion of Mueller's probe comes as House Democrats have launched several of their own into Trump and his personal and political dealings. And no matter what Mueller concludes, they say there is much more investigating to do.

"It's the end of the beginning but it's not the beginning of the end," said Delaware Sen. Chris Coons, a Democratic member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, echoing his party's strategy moving forward.

In a Saturday conference call, Coons also issued a warning for his fellow Democrats, many of whom have pinned astronomical political hopes on Mueller's findings: "Once we get the principal conclusions of the report, I think it's entirely possible that that will be a good day for the president and his core supporters."

As they waited for more information, House Democrats planned conference calls. In a letter to colleagues Saturday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said there would be an "emergency caucus conference call" in the afternoon in which committee chairmen would update all Democratic House members on "where we go from here." Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee were expected to convene on a smaller call beforehand.

Without the results of the report, the Democrats were expected to discuss the few details that are currently known and also their own plans to call for more transparency. Pelosi said in the letter that Barr's offer to provide Congress with a summary of conclusions was "insufficient."

Democrats have said they have to see the full report from Mueller, including underlying evidence, before they can assess it. Those demands for information are setting up a potential tug of war between Congress and the Trump administration that federal judges might eventually have to referee.

Six Democratic committee chairmen wrote in a letter to Barr on Friday that if Mueller has any reason to believe that Trump "has engaged in criminal or other serious misconduct," then the Justice Department should not conceal it.

"The president is not above the law and the need for public faith in our democratic institutions and the rule of law must be the priority," the chairmen wrote.

It's unclear what Mueller has found related to the president, or if any of it would be damning. In his investigation of whether Trump's campaign coordinated with Russia to sway the 2016 election, Mueller has already brought charges against 34 people, including six aides and advisers to the president, and three companies.

Lawmakers say they need that underlying evidence — including interviews, documents and material turned over to the grand jury — because the Justice Department has maintained that a president cannot be indicted and also that derogatory information cannot be released about people who have not been charged. So if the investigation did find evidence incriminating Trump, they may not be able to release it, under their own guidelines.

The Democrats say it could be tantamount to a cover-up if the department did not let Congress and the public know what they found.

Barr testified at his confirmation hearings that he wants to release as much information as he can about the inquiry. But the department's regulations require only that the attorney general report to Congress that the investigation has concluded and describe or explain any times when he or Rosenstein decided an action Mueller proposed "was so inappropriate or unwarranted" that it should not be pursued. Barr said Friday there were no such instances where Mueller was thwarted.

But anything less than the full report won't be enough for Democrats.

"If the AG plays any games, we will subpoena the report, ask Mr. Mueller to testify, and take it all to court if necessary," said Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney, D-N.Y. "The people deserve to know."

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam Schiff told CNN on Friday that he's willing to subpoena Mueller and Barr, if needed, to push for disclosure.

Though Trump himself has said the report should be made public, it's not clear whether the administration would fight subpoenas for testimony or block the transmission of grand jury material.

If the administration decides to fight, lawmakers could ask federal courts to step in and enforce a subpoena. A court fight could, in theory, reach the Supreme Court. But few tussles between Congress and the White House get that far. They often are resolved through negotiation.

In both the Clinton and Obama administrations, even when talks failed and courts got involved in assessing claims of executive privilege, the White House decided not to take the fight to the high court and complied with lower court rulings against it.

The Democrats, led by Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, could also formally ask Mueller to send his committee evidence that could be used in possible impeachment proceedings against Trump, as suggested by Benjamin Wittes, a senior Brookings Institution fellow and editor-in-chief of the Lawfare blog.

That's the course one of Nadler's predecessors followed during Watergate, although an impeachment inquiry against President Richard Nixon had already started by that point. Grand jury material from special counsel Leon Jaworski, provided through the federal judge who presided over the Watergate trials, became the road map that the House committee used to vote for articles of impeachment. Nixon resigned before the full House acted on his impeachment.

Pelosi said recently that she's not for impeaching Trump, at least for now.

Associated Press writer Lisa Mascaro contributed to this report.

Source: NewsMax

Democratic presidential candidate Kamala Harris on Saturday called for a significant federal investment in teacher pay, the first policy proposal that she has put forth since officially launching her 2020 campaign.

At a rally in Houston, Harris argued that the U.S. faces a teacher pay crisis that requires a national response. She pledged by the end of her first term to close a pay gap that Harris said currently amounts to teachers making about $13,000 a year less than other college graduates.

"You can judge a society by the way it treats its children, and one of the greatest expressions of love that a society can give to its children is educating those children with resources they need," Harris said.

Harris' campaign is citing a study from the liberal-leaning Economic Policy Institute that found that what's called the "teacher pay penalty" — the difference in compensation for teachers and comparable public workers — is larger than ever. The Economic Policy Institute study puts the teacher compensation penalty at a record-high 11.1 percent in 2017.

Harris, a U.S. senator from California, plans to release more details of the plan next week, but she said her proposal will amount to the largest federal investment in teacher pay in American history. It was not immediately clear how much money Harris is calling to be diverted to educators' pay or how the plan will be funded, but she told a packed gymnasium at Texas Southern University that the cost shouldn't be the question.

"The question is: What's the return on the investment?" Harris said.

Harris' focus on the pay of educators comes as walkouts by teachers protesting low pay and education funding shortfalls have made headlines across the country. Throngs of teachers have marched in states across the country demanding better funding, including in California.

In February, Harris threw her support behind striking teachers in her hometown of Oakland, where she launched her campaign earlier this year.

The rally in Houston was Harris' first in Texas since announcing that she would seek the Democratic presidential nomination.

Source: NewsMax

Special Counsel Robert Mueller's final report on the Russia investigation does not recommend any further indictments, according to several media reports.

A Justice Department official,who called Mueller's report "comprehensive" told the Associated Press that Mueller is finished pursuing indictments as part of his probe.

The official was not authorized to discuss the probe and asked for anonymity.

Mueller delivered his report to Attorney General William Barr and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein at some point on Friday. The White House was informed of the news at 4:45 p.m. ET, according to reports.

As of now, the contents of the report are a closely guarded secret among a select group of DOJ officials. Barr told lawmakers he could brief them on Mueller's findings as soon as this weekend.

The Mueller investigation produced roughly three dozen indictments, although the vast majority of them involved Russians or Russian companies. President Donald Trump has proclaimed his innocence since the start, calling it a "witch hunt" and said his campaign did not work with the Russians to win the election.

Trump has yet to comment on the conclusion of Mueller's probe. White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders said neither Trump nor anyone else at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue has been briefed on Mueller's findings.

Source: NewsMax

Special Counsel Robert Mueller's final report on the Russia investigation does not recommend any further indictments, according to several media reports.

A Justice Department official,who called Mueller's report "comprehensive" told the Associated Press that Mueller is finished pursuing indictments as part of his probe.

The official was not authorized to discuss the probe and asked for anonymity.

Mueller delivered his report to Attorney General William Barr and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein at some point on Friday. The White House was informed of the news at 4:45 p.m. ET, according to reports.

As of now, the contents of the report are a closely guarded secret among a select group of DOJ officials. Barr told lawmakers he could brief them on Mueller's findings as soon as this weekend.

The Mueller investigation produced roughly three dozen indictments, although the vast majority of them involved Russians or Russian companies. President Donald Trump has proclaimed his innocence since the start, calling it a "witch hunt" and said his campaign did not work with the Russians to win the election.

Trump has yet to comment on the conclusion of Mueller's probe. White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders said neither Trump nor anyone else at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue has been briefed on Mueller's findings.

Source: NewsMax

Special Counsel Robert Mueller's final report on the Russia investigation does not recommend any further indictments, according to several media reports.

A Justice Department official,who called Mueller's report "comprehensive" told the Associated Press that Mueller is finished pursuing indictments as part of his probe.

The official was not authorized to discuss the probe and asked for anonymity.

Mueller delivered his report to Attorney General William Barr and Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein at some point on Friday. The White House was informed of the news at 4:45 p.m. ET, according to reports.

As of now, the contents of the report are a closely guarded secret among a select group of DOJ officials. Barr told lawmakers he could brief them on Mueller's findings as soon as this weekend.

The Mueller investigation produced roughly three dozen indictments, although the vast majority of them involved Russians or Russian companies. President Donald Trump has proclaimed his innocence since the start, calling it a "witch hunt" and said his campaign did not work with the Russians to win the election.

Trump has yet to comment on the conclusion of Mueller's probe. White House Press Secretary Sarah Sanders said neither Trump nor anyone else at 1600 Pennsylvania Avenue has been briefed on Mueller's findings.

Source: NewsMax

President Donald Trump’s lawyers want an early look at special counsel Robert Mueller’s findings before they are made public.

That’s according to Rudy Giuliani, Trump’s attorney. He says Trump’s legal team hasn’t received any assurances that they’ll get the early look they want, though.

Mueller notified Attorney General William Barr on Friday that he had concluded his probe of Russian election interference and any possible coordination with Donald Trump’s campaign.

Source: NewsMax

Senior White House adviser and President Donald Trump's son-in-law Jared Kushner will reportedly cooperate with the House Judiciary Committee's investigation into Trump's background.

According to The Hill, Kushner's lawyer confirmed he will hand over documents the panel requested as part of a sweeping Democratic probe.

With Democrats now in control of the House, they have targeted dozens of people in Trump's orbit as they look for anything that indicated Trump may have broken the law before or after he became president.

Judiciary panel chairman Rep. Jerry Nadler, D-N.Y., has also asked Donald Trump Jr. and Eric Trump for documents.

Source: NewsMax


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