Samuel Chamberlain

A man who died last month at the West Hollywood home of prominent Democratic Party fundraiser Ed Buck warned his friends to steer clear of the well-connected donor and referred to him as a "f—ing devil" and "a horrible, horrible man," according to a report Monday night.

Timothy Dean, 55, was found dead in Buck’s apartment early on Jan. 7, 17 months after 26-year-old male escort Gemmel Moore was found dead of a methamphetamine overdose. The Daily Beast reported that Dean and Buck had a relationship years before Moore’s death, but Dean’s friends claimed the relationship turned into a one-sided after — with Buck sending multiple text messages to Dean and Dean declining to respond.

One friend of Dean, DeMarco Majors, told the website that Moore told him during a November 2018 conversation: "Ed Buck hits me up all the time, and I don’t answer none of his text messages. Don’t you take your a– over there." Majors said he told Dean that he didn’t know who Buck was, but that did not deter Dean.

Timothy Dean died at the residence of Democratic donor Ed Buck earlier this year

Timothy Dean died at the residence of Democratic donor Ed Buck earlier this year

GEMMEL MOORE INVESTIGATION: PROSECUTORS DECLINE TO FILE CHARGES AGAINST DEM DONOR IN FATAL OVERDOSE

"Don’t you go over there,” Dean reportedly told Majors again. "I’m not going over there either. S—, I’m not trying to end up dead."

Buck’s attorney, Seymour Amster, described Dean at the time of his death as a "longtime friend" of Buck who had "reached out for his help" and had begun "acting in a bizarre way" after he arrived at Buck’s apartment the night he died. When contacted by Fox News about the Daily Beast report, Amster wrote in an email: "We are in possession of text messages from Mr. Dean to Mr. Buck that refute the picture the Daily Beast is trying to paint of the relationship between Mr. Dean and Mr. Buck. The text messages do not put Mr. Dean in a good light. We are sure that law enforcement are in possession of these texts as well.

"It seems that Mr. Dean had a secret life he was keeping from a lot of his friends," Amster added. "That is as far as we will go with what we and law enforcement possess … If this matter ends up in a courtroom, and that is a big ‘IF’ we will then decide if it is necessary to disclose Mr. Dean’s secret life."

Walter Harris, another friend of Dean’s, texted him an article about Moore’s July 2017 death. In response, Dean said: "This might be it for Ed Buck" and called him, "f—ing devil." In July 2018, prosecutors declined to file charges against Buck in Moore’s death.

Still another friend, Jermaine Johnson, said Dean told him after Moore died that Buck was “a horrible, horrible man.”

FAMILY WANTS ANSWERS IN ESCORT’S DEATH AT DEM DONOR’S HOME

The cause of Dean’s death has not been made public. Amster told Fox News that Buck was interviewed by police on the night of Dean’s death and "disclosed all of the information law enforcement needed.

"There is no reason to have him re-interviewed," Amster added, "there is nothing new they can obtain."

Click for more from the Daily Beast.

Source: Fox News Politics

Washington Post reporter Jason Rezaian has revealed new details of his horrifying ordeal in an Iranian prison, telling The Guardian newspaper that while he was never physically abused, "I was certainly tortured, and they have to pay for that."

Rezaian, who was held in Tehran’s notorious Evin prison for 18 months on accusations of espionage and related charges before his release in January 2016, has sued Iran in U.S. federal court, alleging he received such "physical mistreatment and severe psychological abuse … that he will never be the same." He also has written a memoir about his experience, "Prisoner," which was published last month.

A native of California, Rezaian held both U.S. and Iranian citizenship at the time of his arrest in July 2014. He was working as the Post’s Tehran correspondent and was living in the capital with his wife, Bloomberg News reporter Yeganeh Salehi, when both were arrested by members of the theocracy’s secret police.

HELL ON EARTH: INSIDE IRAN’S BRUTAL EVIN PRISON

"For the first six or seven months, [the threat of execution] was pretty regular," said Rezaian, who recalled seeing condemned prisoners when he was taken to and from court for his secret trial. "It was the constant anxiety of: ‘Are they going to kill me, are they going to keep me forever or am I going to be released tomorrow?’ You don’t know what to believe. That’s the method. That’s the torture."

Rezaian told The Guardian he had nightmares of being kept in prison after he was supposed to be released. He also said he’s become more nervous about taking on overseas assignments.

"Like many foreign correspondents, I used to be pretty intrepid in where I was willing to go," he said. "Now I’m not. I have to have very concrete plans. I get anxious and paranoid if I don’t know how I’m going to get back to my hotel. All these things are so counter to the way that I lived for so many years."

WIFE OF U.S. SCHOLAR IMPRISONED IN IRAN SPEAKS OUT: ‘HIS ONLY CRIME IS HE’S AMERICAN’

Rezaian also said the murder of Saudi activist Jamal Khashoggi, who contributed columns to the Post’s global opinions section, had a psychological effect on his wife and him. Khashoggi was murdered this past October in the Saudi consulate in Istanbul, Turkey.

"We were kindred spirits, in the sense that we both felt forced out of place," Rezaian told the Guardian of Khashoggi and himself. "[We felt] that these governments didn’t want to see us in their midst any longer."

In one of Rezaian’s final conversations with his interrogators before returning to the U.S., he said, they predicted that Donald Trump would win the U.S. presidential election.

"It’s very simple," one of them reportedly told Rezaian. "Trump is the candidate that hates Muslims most."

Click for more from The Guardian.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News World

A woman who has accused Virginia Lt. Gov. Justin Fairfax of raping her while they were undergraduates at Duke University nearly two decades ago called Monday for the state’s general assembly to hold a public hearing into her allegations and those of another woman against the Democrat.

Meredith Watson wrote in a Washington Post opinion piece that she was "frustrated by calls for an investigation rather than a public hearing" into the allegations brought against Fairfax by her and Vanessa Tyson.

"Such ‘investigations’ are secret proceedings, out of the public eye, leaving victims vulnerable to selective leaks and smears. And we all know how such investigations end: with ‘inconclusive results,’" Watson wrote. "My privacy has already been violated, yet I am still willing to testify publicly under oath. Tyson has made the same offer. Our plea to the Virginia General Assembly to require the same of Fairfax has been met with inaction."

Watson has said that Fairfax raped her in 2000, but that she did not report it because of how Duke officials responded to her earlier claim that she was raped by basketball star Corey Maggette. An attorney for Watson has claimed that Fairfax was one of the people she told about the alleged assault by Maggette and that the future lieutenant governor "used this prior assault against Ms. Watson" when he allegedly raped her. The attorney, Nancy Erika Smith, claimed that Fairfax told Watson at a campus party after the alleged assault that "I knew that because of what happened to you last year, you’d be too afraid to say anything."

FACEBOOK MESSAGES SHOW SECOND FAIRFAX ACCUSER DETAILED RAPE ALLEGATIONS DURING 2017 RACE

Last week, Fox News obtained Facebook messages from Watson in which she commented on Fairfax’s 2017 candidacy for Virginia lieutenant governor and told contacts about the alleged rape.

"I see you’ve been promoting Justin Fairfax on FB despite knowing he raped me, which is mind-blowing to me. Are you seriously voting for him today? #METOO,” she wrote to one contact on Election Day, 2017.

Tyson, an associate professor of politics at Scripps College in California, previously accused Fairfax of forcing her to perform oral sex on him during the 2004 Democratic National Convention in Boston. Fairfax, who was attending Columbia Law School, was working as a so-called "body man" for vice presidential nominee John Edwards.

Fairfax has said that the encounters with Watson and Tyson were consensual and suggested that both women’s accusations are part of a political smear campaign to prevent him from succeeding Democratic Gov. Ralph Northam if he’s forced to resign amid a racist photo scandal.

Watson wrote that she had refused to make her allegations "a partisan issue" or "a financial issue by suing for compensation. I have refused to make it a law-enforcement issue. Despite nearly 100 offers to be interviewed, I have refused to make my rape a media opportunity … My motivation was never for personal gain. And what have I gained? I have endured relentless scrutiny of my personal life and an unending, bitter flood of hurtful misinformation trumpeted by the media."

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"Despite every attempt to shame me, I am not ashamed," Watson concluded. "It is Justin Fairfax who should be ashamed. It is the Virginia legislature that should be ashamed. And it is the media that should be ashamed.

"If we as a society continue to allow women who report rape to be abused, disparaged and tormented a second time, then shame on us all."

Fox News’ Brooke Singman, Matt Richardson, Garrett Tenney and The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Notorious Nation of Islam leader Louis Farrakhan defended Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., for implying on Twitter last week that the pro-Israel lobbying group AIPAC compensated lawmakers in exchange for supporting the Jewish state.

In remarks at the NOI’s annual Saviours’ Day celebration Sunday at Chicago’s United Center, Farrakhan condemned lawmakers who pressed Omar to apologize in the wake of her remarks.

"Sweetheart, don’t do that," Farrakhan said, addressing Omar. "Pardon me for calling you sweetheart, but you do have a sweet heart. You sure are using it to shake the government up, but you have nothing to apologize for."

REP. RASHIDA TLAIB WROTE COLUMN FOR LOUIS FARRAKHAN PUBLICATION IN 2006

Omar tweeted on Feb. 10 that congressional support of Israel was "all about the Benjamins, baby," a reference to a 1997 rap song by Puff Daddy. When Batya Ungar-Sargon, the opinion editor of The Forward newspaper, asked Omar who she thought "is paying American politicians to be pro-Israel," the congresswoman answered: "AIPAC!"

BILL MAHER DEFENDS ILHAN OMAR’S ISRAEL COMMENTS: ‘I DON’T KNOW WHY THIS HAS TO BE SEEN AS ANTI-SEMITIC’

The tweets were met with backlash from members of both parties. President Trump called on Omar to "resign from Congress or … certainly resign from the [House] foreign affairs committee." The chairman of that committee, Rep. Eliot Engel, D-N.Y., said it was "shocking to hear a Member of Congress invoke the anti-Semitic trope of ‘Jewish money,’" while House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler, D-N.Y., called the comments "deeply disappointing and disturbing."

On Sunday, Farrakhan insisted that "Israel and AIPAC pays off senators and congressmen to do their bidding, so [Omar is] not lying. So if you’re not lying, stop laying down. You were sent there by the people to shake up that corrupt House. Shake it up!"

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Farrakhan has a long history of anti-Semitic comments. Last year, he lost his verified status on Twitter after posting a video in which he asked: "I wonder, will you see the Satanic Jew and the Synagogue of Satan, which has many races in it because Satan has deceived the whole world?" Farrakhan has also said that he is not an anti-Semite, but rather "anti-termite," and led a "Death to Israel" chant during a visit to Iran in November.

Last month, Farrakhan posted a clip from a 2015 interview to Instagram in which he called for a separate nation-state for black Americans, saying: "Most of our people don’t want it here … God has something else for us."

Fox News’ Lukas Mikelionis and Liam Quinn contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Democratic presidential candidate Kamala Harris appeared to be caught off guard Monday when she was asked about the latest developments in the alleged attack on "Empire" actor Jussie Smollett.

During an appearance at a bookstore in Concord, N.H., a female reporter asked the senator from California if she wanted to amend a tweet from Jan. 29, in which she said Smollett was the victim of "an attempted modern day lynching" and called the actor "one of the kindest, most gentle human beings I know."

"Which tweet? What tweet?" Harris asked. As the reporter specified the tweet in question, Harris appeared to look around for a campaign staffer before responding.

"OK, so, I will say this about that case," she said. "I think that the facts are still unfolding, and, um, I’m very, um, concerned about obviously, the initial, um, allegation that he made about what might have happened.

CORY BOOKER ‘WITHHOLDING’ JUDGMENT ON SMOLLETT CASE AFTER CALLING IT ‘ATTEMPTED MODERN DAY LYNCHING’

"And it’s something we should all take seriously whenever anyone, um, alleges that kind of behavior, but there should be an investigation," Harris added. "And I think that once the investigation has concluded then we can all comment, but I’m not going to comment until I know the outcome of the investigation."

On Sunday, Harris’ fellow senator and Democratic presidential candidate, Cory Booker, told reporters he would "withhold" judgment on the matter "until all the information actually comes out from on-the-record sources." Booker also referred to the alleged Jan. 29 attack on Smollett as "an attempted modern-day lynching" and pushed Congress to pass legislation making lynching a federal hate crime.

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Smollett, who is black and openly gay, claimed he was assaulted by two men who yelled racist and anti-gay slurs– as well as the phrase "This is MAGA country!" — as Smollett was walking to his Chicago apartment. Chicago police arrested and questioned two Nigerian brothers in the alleged attack, but released them on Friday without charges. Investigators said they’ve requested a follow-up interview with Smollett, but the actor’s representatives said there have been no plans to meet with police for the time being.

The Chicago Police Department repeatedly has declined to confirm local media reports that the attack was staged.

Fox News’ Mariah Haas contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

President Trump on Monday accused Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein and former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe of pursuing an “illegal and treasonous” plot against him, after McCabe detailed private DOJ discussions about secretly recording and potentially ousting the president.

The alleged discussions have been a subject of fierce debate – and conflicting accounts – for months. But McCabe revived the issue during promotional interviews for his forthcoming book, telling CBS News’ "60 Minutes" that Rosenstein was “absolutely serious” when he suggested recording Trump in the tumultuous days following James Comey’s firing as FBI director.

FORMER TOP FBI LAWYER: TWO TRUMP CABINET OFFICIALS WERE ‘READY TO SUPPORT’ 25TH AMENDMENT EFFORT

Trump seethed on Twitter over the comments, calling McCabe a liar before lashing out at top DOJ and FBI officials, including ousted Attorney General Jeff Sessions, for what he described as a “deranged” plan.

“He and Rod Rosenstein, who was hired by Jeff Sessions (another beauty), look like they were planning a very illegal act, and got caught … There is a lot of explaining to do to the millions of people who had just elected a president who they really like and who has done a great job for them with the Military, Vets, Economy and so much more. This was the illegal and treasonous ‘insurance policy’ in full action!” he tweeted.

“Insurance policy” is a reference to texts between former FBI officials Peter Strzok and Lisa Page discussing such a policy, without elaborating – the text was widely suspected of referring to aspects of the Russia collusion probe.

While Trump fumed at McCabe, the former FBI deputy director claimed he "never actually considered taking [Rosenstein] up on the offer." He said he did discuss the matter with the FBI’s then-general counsel, James A. Baker. Last fall, as reported by Fox News, Baker told lawmakers during a closed-door deposition that McCabe and Page came to Baker "contemporaneously" and told him details of the meeting where Rosenstein made the comments. Baker told congressional investigators he took the word of McCabe and Page "seriously."

McCabe told CBS News that "I think the general counsel had a heart attack" when he told him of Rosenstein’s plan.

"And when he got up off the floor, he said, ‘I, I, that’s a bridge too far. We’re not there yet,’" McCabe added. Days later, Rosenstein appointed former FBI Director Robert Mueller as a special counsel to oversee the bureau’s investigation into allegations of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russian officials.

MCCABE SAYS ROSENSTEIN SERIOUS ABOUT RECORDING TRUMP

Rosenstein repeatedly has denied he "pursued or authorized recording the president" and also has denied McCabe’s suggestion that the deputy attorney general had broached the idea of invoking the Constitution’s 25th Amendment, which allows Cabinet members to seek the removal of a president if they conclude that he or she is mentally unfit. The Justice Department echoed both denials in a statement released last week, saying Rosenstein "was not in a position to consider invoking the 25th Amendment."

Yet McCabe said in the interview, "Rod raised the [25th Amendment] issue and discussed it with me in the context of thinking about how many other Cabinet officials might support such an effort.” He added that he believed Rosenstein was "counting votes or possible votes" to remove Trump from office.

Fox News reported Sunday that Baker, in his testimony to Congress, provided even more details about the alleged 25th Amendment discussions – saying two Cabinet officials were “ready to support” such an effort.

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“I was being told by some combination of Andy McCabe and Lisa Page, that, in a conversation with the Deputy Attorney General, he had stated that he — this was what was related to me – that he had at least two members of the president’s Cabinet who were ready to support, I guess you would call it, an action under the 25th Amendment,” Baker testified.

Fox News’ Catherine Herridge contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

A suspected armed robber was killed Sunday night in New Orleans‘ central business district following a shootout with police that left three others critically injured, authorities said.

New Orleans Police Department spokesman Andy Cunningham told reporters the suspect had opened fire on officers at approximately 6:45 p.m. Cunningham added that no officers were hit in the exchange of gunfire, but one officer was injured in a car crash while responding to the scene.

"It was like ‘Wild, Wild West’ going on," one witness told local media.

New Orleans EMS spokesman Lt. Jonathan Fourcade told Fox 8 Live that the shooting unfolded near the intersection of Canal Street and Elk Place. The intersection is just outside the boundary of the French Quarter and located near New Orleans City Hall, the Superdome and Tulane University Medical School.

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It was not immediately clear whether the three injured victims were bystanders. NOLA.com reported that one of the victims was 17 years old. Fourcade said all three were at University Medical Center in critical condition and added that another person was treated at the hospital for abrasions.

The witness told NOLA.com that he saw a man running down Tulane Avenue before hearing approximately 50 gunshots, which the witness said were fired by the man and at least two police officers. The witness added that he later saw authorities trying to revive the man after he fell in front of Tulane Medical Center.

Click for more from Fox8Live.com.

Source: Fox News National

Sen. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., reiterated his support for President Trump’s national emergency declaration at the southern border Sunday, telling CBS News’ "Face The Nation" that students in Kentucky would be better off if funds that might have gone toward the construction of a new middle school would go toward building a wall along the frontier.

White House officials said Friday that they plan to spend $8 billion on the wall — the nearly $1.4 billion Congress approved for new fences and barriers, plus more than $6 billion drawn from other funds. "Face The Nation" moderator Margaret Brennan suggested to Graham that $3.6 billion of that $6 billion could come from military construction, including "including construction of a middle school in Kentucky, housing for military families, improvements for bases like Camp Pendleton [in California] and Hanscom Air Force Base [in Massachusetts]."

"Well, the president will have to make a decision where to get the money," Graham responded. "Let’s just say for a moment that he took some money out of the military construction budget.

"I would say it’s better for the middle-school kids in Kentucky to have a secure border," the senator added. "We’ll get them the school they need. But right now we’ve got a national emergency on our hands. Opioid addiction is going through the roof in this country. Thousands of Americans died last year or dying this year because we can’t control the flow of drugs into this country and all of it’s coming across the border."

Graham also declined to say whether Congress should restrict the definition of a national emergency in order to act as more of a check on the executive branch.

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"I think that every member of Congress has watched three presidents send troops to the border," he said, "Bush, Obama, now Trump. Not one of us have complained about deploying forces to the border to secure the border. It’s pretty hard for me to understand the legal difference between sending troops and having them build a barrier."

"Unfortunately, when it comes to Trump, the Congress is locked down and will not give him what we’ve given past presidents," Graham added.  So, unfortunately, he’s got to do it on his own and I support his decision to go that route."

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

Source: Fox News Politics

Former FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe said in an interview broadcast Sunday that Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein "was not joking" when he suggested secretly recording President Donald Trump in the Oval Office following the May 2017 dismissal of FBI Director James Comey.

McCabe, speaking to CBS News’ "60 Minutes," recounted a conversation soon after Comey’s firing about the ongoing Russia investigation in which he said Rosenstein told him: "I never get searched when I go into the White House. I could easily wear a recording device. They wouldn’t know it was there."

"Now, he was not joking," McCabe said of Rosenstein’s comments. "He was absolutely serious. And in fact, he brought it up in the next meeting we had."

McCabe told "60 Minutes" that he "never actually considered taking [Rosenstein] up on the offer," but said he did discuss the matter with the FBI’s then-general counsel, James A. Baker. Last fall, Baker told lawmakers during a closed-door deposition that McCabe and FBI lawyer Lisa Page came to Baker "contemporaneously" and told him details of the meeting where Rosenstein made the comments. Baker told congressional investigators he took the word of McCabe and Page "seriously."

FORMER TOP FBI LAWYER: TWO TRUMP CABINET OFFICIALS WERE ‘READY TO SUPPORT’ 25TH AMENDMENT EFFORT

McCabe told CBS News that "I think the general counsel had a heart attack" when he told him of Rosenstein’s plan.

"And when he got up off the floor, he said, ‘I, I, that’s a bridge too far. We’re not there yet,’" McCabe added. Days later, Rosenstein appointed former FBI Director Robert Mueller as a special counsel to oversee the bureau’s investigation into allegations of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russian officials.

Rosenstein repeatedly has denied he "pursued or authorized recording the president" and also has denied McCabe’s suggestion that the deputy attorney general had broached the idea of invoking the Constitution’s 25th Amendment, which allows Cabinet members to seek the removal of a president if they conclude that he or she is mentally unfit. The Justice Department echoed both denials in a statement released last week, saying Rosenstein "was not in a position to consider invoking the 25th Amendment."

"Rod raised the [25th Amendment] issue and discussed it with me in the context of thinking about how many other cabinet officials might support such an effort," McCabe told interviewer Scott Pelley, adding that he believed Rosenstein was "counting votes or possible votes" to remove Trump from office.

"What seemed to be coursing through the mind of the deputy attorney general was getting rid of the president of the United States one way or another," Pelley suggested.

"I can’t confirm that," McCabe answered. "But what I can say is, the deputy attorney general was definitely very concerned about the president, about his capacity and about his intent at that point in time."

MCCABE, ROSENSTEIN MUST TESTIFY TO EXPLAIN CLAIM THAT DOJ DISCUSSED REMOVING TRUMP, GOP LEADERS SAY

According to McCabe, Rosenstein was affected by what McCabe called an "incredibly turbulent, incredibly stressful" time after Comey’s firing. The former FBI deputy director claimed Trump had instructed Rosenstein to cite the Russia investigation in a memo Rosenstein wrote justifying Comey’s dismissal.

"[Trump was] saying things like, ‘Make sure you put Russia in your memo.’ That concerned Rod in the same way that it concerned me and the FBI investigators on the Russia case," said McCabe, who added that Rosenstein "explained to the president that he did not need Russia in his memo. And the president responded, ‘I understand that. I am asking you to put Russia in the memo anyway.’"

During his interview, McCabe criticized Trump for what he called an "unwillingness to learn the true state of affairs that he has to deal with every day." He cited an account by an anonymous FBI official who met with the president only to be met with "several unrelated diatribes by Trump."

MUELLER CLAIMS TO HAVE EVIDENCE ROGER STONE COMMUNICATED WITH WIKILEAKS

"One of those was commenting on the recent missile launches by the government of North Korea," McCabe said. "And, essentially, the president said he did not believe that the North Koreans had the capability to hit us here with ballistic missiles in the United States. And he did not believe that because [Russian] President [Vladimir] Putin had told him they did not. President Putin had told him that the North Koreans don’t actually have those missiles."

When intelligence officials allegedly told Trump that their information did not match what the Russian leader had told him, Trump allegedly said, "I don’t care. I believe Putin."

McCabe was dismissed from the FBI in March 2018 after the Justice Department’s internal watchdog concluded he approved leaking information to a Wall Street Journal reporter in order to cast himself in a positive light, then lied under oath about it. In the interview broadcast Sunday, McCabe denied intentionally misleading the DOJ’s internal investigators, saying: "There’s absolutely no reason for anyone and certainly not for me to misrepresent what happened … Did I ever intentionally mislead the people I spoke to? I did not. I had no reason to. And I did not."

He added, "I believe I was fired because I opened a case against the president of the United States."

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In the White House response to McCabe’s claims, Press Secretary Sarah Sanders noted that "Andrew McCabe was fired in total disgrace from the FBI because he lied to investigators on multiple occasions, including under oath. His selfish and destructive agenda drove him to open a completely baseless investigation into the President. His actions were so shameful that he was referred to federal prosecutors.

"Andrew McCabe has no credibility and is an embarrassment to the men and women of the FBI and our great country."

Source: Fox News Politics

Trump is NOT going to accept ANY deal by Congress without #TheWall White House officials dangled the possibility of another partial shutdown next month. The president also cast doubt on the prospect of lawmakers reaching any agreement before funding for most government agencies runs out on Feb. 15, telling The Wall Street Journal: “I personally […]


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