Indiana

Adding more justices to the high court is "maybe an argument worth taking seriously," Christopher Scalia said Wednesday in response to some 2020 Democrats' push to do so.

Scalia, the son of the late Supreme Court justice Antonin Scalia, also said some proposals were "unconstitutional," including an idea proposed by South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg to add five members who would "only be seated by unanimous agreement of the other 10."

"The problem with that," Scalia told "Your World with Neil Cavuto" during an interview on Fox News, "is, obviously Section 2, Article II of the Constitution makes very clear that the president has the power and authority to nominate and, with the advice and consent of the Senate, to appoint Supreme Court justices. So, I mean, I don't know what . . . these candidates are talking about, but they certainly can't have justices appoint their colleagues. So, that would require an [constitutional] amendment that I just don't think has a snowball's chance anywhere of being ratified."

Other Democratic presidential candidates have proposed changes to the high court, including Beto O'Rourke, who last week said he would be open to the idea of restructuring the court to have five Republican justices and five Democratic justices.

Source: NewsMax

Adding more justices to the high court is "maybe an argument worth taking seriously," Christopher Scalia said Wednesday in response to some 2020 Democrats' push to do so.

Scalia, the son of the late Supreme Court justice Antonin Scalia, also said some proposals were "unconstitutional," including an idea proposed by South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg to add five members who would "only be seated by unanimous agreement of the other 10."

"The problem with that," Scalia told "Your World with Neil Cavuto" during an interview on Fox News, "is, obviously Section 2, Article II of the Constitution makes very clear that the president has the power and authority to nominate and, with the advice and consent of the Senate, to appoint Supreme Court justices. So, I mean, I don't know what . . . these candidates are talking about, but they certainly can't have justices appoint their colleagues. So, that would require an [constitutional] amendment that I just don't think has a snowball's chance anywhere of being ratified."

Other Democratic presidential candidates have proposed changes to the high court, including Beto O'Rourke, who last week said he would be open to the idea of restructuring the court to have five Republican justices and five Democratic justices.

Source: NewsMax

Katie Jerkovich | Entertainment Reporter

Netflix lit up the internet Wednesday when it dropped the official trailer for Season 3 of “Stranger Things,” and it’s fair to say fans are freaking out.

In the nearly three-minute-long trailer, we got a sneak peek at all our favorite characters as classic music from the 80s played in the background.

Soon we are introduced to at least one of the creatures from the infamous upside-down that the people in the small town of Hawkins, Indiana, will have to deal with once again. (RELATED: Watch The Trailer For Tom Hanks’ Latest Film ‘Inferno’ [VIDEO])

WATCH:

The clip shared on YouTube starts out with Eleven (played by Millie Bobbie Brown) using her powers to give one of the guys, Dustin, a good scare as the gang welcomes him home while Motley Crue’s “Home Sweet Home” played.

There is a return of fan favorites like Chief Hopper (David Harbour) and Joyce Byers (Winona Ryder), just to name a few. At one point, we hear Mike played by Finn Wolfhard saying, “We’re not kids anymore. I mean what did you think? We are just going to sit in my basement all day?”

Everything seems like life has moved on since we last saw all of them, but soon, it becomes clear that danger still lurks. (RELATED:  ‘Stranger Things’ Is Coming Back For A Second Season [VIDEO])

There are very quick flashes of things like men wielding guns and a large monster-like creature, among so many other things.

The highly anticipated third season follows the surprising hit of 2016 when the streaming site launched “Stranger Things.” The sci-fi series follows the adventures of a group of teenagers and one supernatural girl as they battle monsters from the upside-down.

Fans won’t have to wait much longer to see their favorite show as it hits Netflix July 4.

Source: The Daily Caller

Katie Jerkovich | Entertainment Reporter

Netflix lit up the internet Wednesday when it dropped the official trailer for Season 3 of “Stranger Things,” and it’s fair to say fans are freaking out.

In the nearly three-minute-long trailer, we got a sneak peek at all our favorite characters as classic music from the 80s played in the background.

Soon we are introduced to at least one of the creatures from the infamous upside-down that the people in the small town of Hawkins, Indiana, will have to deal with once again. (RELATED: Watch The Trailer For Tom Hanks’ Latest Film ‘Inferno’ [VIDEO])

WATCH:

The clip shared on YouTube starts out with Eleven (played by Millie Bobbie Brown) using her powers to give one of the guys, Dustin, a good scare as the gang welcomes him home while Motley Crue’s “Home Sweet Home” played.

There is a return of fan favorites like Chief Hopper (David Harbour) and Joyce Byers (Winona Ryder), just to name a few. At one point, we hear Mike played by Finn Wolfhard saying, “We’re not kids anymore. I mean what did you think? We are just going to sit in my basement all day?”

Everything seems like life has moved on since we last saw all of them, but soon, it becomes clear that danger still lurks. (RELATED:  ‘Stranger Things’ Is Coming Back For A Second Season [VIDEO])

There are very quick flashes of things like men wielding guns and a large monster-like creature, among so many other things.

The highly anticipated third season follows the surprising hit of 2016 when the streaming site launched “Stranger Things.” The sci-fi series follows the adventures of a group of teenagers and one supernatural girl as they battle monsters from the upside-down.

Fans won’t have to wait much longer to see their favorite show as it hits Netflix July 4.

Source: The Daily Caller

Katie Jerkovich | Entertainment Reporter

Netflix lit up the internet Wednesday when it dropped the official trailer for Season 3 of “Stranger Things,” and it’s fair to say fans are freaking out.

In the nearly three-minute-long trailer, we got a sneak peek at all our favorite characters as classic music from the 80s played in the background.

Soon we are introduced to at least one of the creatures from the infamous upside-down that the people in the small town of Hawkins, Indiana, will have to deal with once again. (RELATED: Watch The Trailer For Tom Hanks’ Latest Film ‘Inferno’ [VIDEO])

WATCH:

The clip shared on YouTube starts out with Eleven (played by Millie Bobbie Brown) using her powers to give one of the guys, Dustin, a good scare as the gang welcomes him home while Motley Crue’s “Home Sweet Home” played.

There is a return of fan favorites like Chief Hopper (David Harbour) and Joyce Byers (Winona Ryder), just to name a few. At one point, we hear Mike played by Finn Wolfhard saying, “We’re not kids anymore. I mean what did you think? We are just going to sit in my basement all day?”

Everything seems like life has moved on since we last saw all of them, but soon, it becomes clear that danger still lurks. (RELATED:  ‘Stranger Things’ Is Coming Back For A Second Season [VIDEO])

There are very quick flashes of things like men wielding guns and a large monster-like creature, among so many other things.

The highly anticipated third season follows the surprising hit of 2016 when the streaming site launched “Stranger Things.” The sci-fi series follows the adventures of a group of teenagers and one supernatural girl as they battle monsters from the upside-down.

Fans won’t have to wait much longer to see their favorite show as it hits Netflix July 4.

Source: The Daily Caller

NBA: Brooklyn Nets at Sacramento Kings
Mar 19, 2019; Sacramento, CA, USA; Brooklyn Nets guard D’Angelo Russell (1) defends Sacramento Kings guard De’Aaron Fox (5) during the fourth quarter at Golden 1 Center. Mandatory Credit: Ed Szczepanski-USA TODAY Sports

March 20, 2019

Rondae Hollis-Jefferson scored the winning layup with 0.8 seconds remaining as the Brooklyn Nets overcame a 25-point, fourth-quarter deficit to post a stunning 123-121 victory over the host Sacramento Kings on Tuesday night.

D’Angelo Russell scored 27 of his career-high 44 points in the fourth quarter as the Nets outscored the Kings 45-18 to improve to 1-3 on a seven-game road trip.

Hollis-Jefferson scored 14 points on 6-of-7 shooting and drove through the lane to convert the winning basket. Jarrett Allen scored 13 points, and Spencer Dinwiddie added 10 for Brooklyn.

Marvin Bagley III scored 28 points, and De’Aaron Fox had 27 points and nine assists for Sacramento. Harrison Barnes scored 17 points, Nemanja Bjelica had 14 points and 10 rebounds, and Bogdan Bogdanovic added 10 points for the Kings.

Rockets 121, Hawks 105

Clint Capela posted his sixth straight double-double with 26 points and 11 rebounds, and visiting Houston topped Atlanta to extend its winning streak to three games.

James Harden added 31 points, sinking 11 of 12 from the line, and had 10 assists and eight rebounds. Danuel House Jr. came off the bench to score 19, including six 3-pointers. Chris Paul scored 13 and had 11 assists.

Atlanta got 21 points and 12 assists from Trae Young, plus 20 points and 10 rebounds from John Collins. Taurean Prince added 16 points, and Vince Carter hit five 3-pointers and scored 15.

Warriors 117, Timberwolves 107

Stephen Curry scored 22 of his 36 points in the third quarter, and Klay Thompson added 28 points to lead Golden State past Minnesota at Minneapolis.

Minnesota trailed 59-47 entering the third quarter before going on a 14-2 run, tying the game at 61-all. That’s when Curry took over, scoring eight points in a 94-second span as the Warriors wrested control of the game.

Karl-Anthony Towns scored 26 points and grabbed 21 rebounds for the Timberwolves, who saw their six-game home win streak end.

Bucks 115, Lakers 101

Khris Middleton matched his season high with 30 points and grabbed 10 rebounds, and Milwaukee padded its lead atop the Eastern Conference with a win over visiting Los Angeles.

Playing without Giannis Antetokounmpo (ankle) and Malcolm Brogdon (foot), the Bucks extended their lead over the second-place Toronto Raptors to three games with 11 left for both teams. Brook Lopez matched his season high with 28 points, and Nikola Mirotic scored 23 while starting in place of Brogdon.

Kentavious Caldwell-Pope shot 8-for-14 from 3-point range and scored a season-high 35 points off the bench for Los Angeles. The Lakers, who played without leading scorer LeBron James (groin), lost their fourth straight game and ninth in the past 10.

76ers 118, Hornets 114

Ben Simmons scored 28 points, and JJ Redick had 27 points, 10 rebounds and eight assists as Philadelphia earned its fifth straight victory, beating host Charlotte.

Tobias Harris hit three free throws in the final 8.2 seconds, and the Hornets missed a chance to tie the game when Jeremy Lamb was off target on a drive in the lane with two seconds remaining.

Jimmy Butler added 23 points for the Sixers, who completed a four-game season sweep of the Hornets. Their five-game winning streak is a season high. Charlotte has lost nine of its past 12.

Clippers 115, Pacers 109

Danilo Gallinari scored 24 points, and Montrezl Harrell added 20 as host Los Angeles improved its playoff prospects with a win over Indiana.

Rookie Shai Gilgeous-Alexander added 17 points as the Clippers moved into a tie with the Utah Jazz for seventh place in the Western Conference. The Clippers and Jazz are just 2 1/2 games out of third place in a crowded Western Conference field.

After scoring just two points in the first half, Bojan Bogdanovic finished with 19 as the Pacers lost their third consecutive game, keeping their playoff-clinching celebration on hold. Tyreke Evans also scored 19.

–Field Level Media

Source: OANN

Republican Florida Sen. Marco Rubio announced Tuesday on Twitter his intention to introduce a constitutional amendment that would permanently keep the number of Supreme Court justices at nine.

“We must prevent further destabilization of essential institutions,” Rubio tweeted. “Court packing is quickly becoming a litmus test for 2020 Democratic candidates. Therefore I will be introducing a constitutional amendment to keep the number of seats on #SCOTUS at 9.”

Rubio’s proposal comes as multiple Democrats vying for the 2020 nomination have come out in favor of expanding the court. Democratic presidential candidates, including California Sen. Kamala Harris, Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren, New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, former Texas Rep. Beto O’Rourke, and South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg have all expressed a willingness to adding justices. (RELATED: Is Chief Justice John Roberts Tacking Left?)

US senator Marco Rubio, addresses the press on the humanitarian aid shipments sent by the US government for Venezuela that are stockpiled at a collection center in the Colombian border, at the Simon Bolivar international bridge in Cucuta, Colombia, border with San Antonio de Tachira, Venezuela on February 17, 2019. (LUIS ROBAYO/AFP/Getty Images)

President Donald Trump also addressed the recent emergence of court-packing as a Democratic talking point during a Tuesday press conference with Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro.

“No, I wouldn’t entertain that,” Trump asserted of the idea. “The only reason they’re doing that is they want to try to catch up. So if they can’t catch up through the ballot box by winning an election, they want to try doing it in a different way. We would have no interest in that whatsoever. It’ll never happen. It won’t happen, I guarantee. It won’t happen for six years.”

Republican Tennessee Rep. Mark Green also announced Tuesday that he “will be introducing a constitutional amendment that would limit the number of Supreme Court justices to 9,” later this week.

Follow Mike on Twitter

Source: The Daily Caller

Matt M. Miller | Contributor

Democratic 2020 candidates will participate in a presidential debate focused solely on LGBTQ issues.

The event, which will be hosted by the Human Rights Campaign Foundation (HRC) and the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs, is scheduled for October 10, 2019, at UCLA’s Royce Hall on the eve of National Coming Out Day.

According to Advocate, the debate will prompt discussions on “conversion therapy” restrictions, hate crime retribution and transgender rights. (RELATED: Mother Arrested, Spends Seven Hours In Jail For Calling Transgender A Man)

HRC President Chad Griffin stressed the importance of 2020 Democratic candidates addressing LGBTQ issues, saying, “Millions of LGBTQ people will have their rights on the ballot in 2020 — but today, we are also a powerful voting bloc that will help determine the outcome.”

He continued, “If any LGBTQ person were to take a cross-country drive from HRC headquarters in Washington, D.C., to UCLA’s campus, their rights and protections under the law would change dozens of times at every city line and state border.”

The organizers of the event will be using the same rules as Democratic National Committee sanctioned debates, where candidates are required to receive at least 1 percent of the vote in three national polls or receive 65,000 donations from people in 20 sates to qualify for participation.

Given these rules and the most recent polling data, Bernie Sanders, Kamala Harris, Elizabeth Warren, Cory Booker, Beto O’Rourke, John Hickenlooper and Amy Klobuchar would constitute the qualifying Democratic candidates. (RELATED: A Transgender Woman Is Highly Favored To Win Miss Universe: Here Are The Wild Odds)

Pete Buttigieg, the Mayor of South Bend, Indiana, is the only LGBTQ Democrat who has expressed serious interest in a 2020 presidential candidacy. If he does decide to officially run, he would qualify to participate in the October forum since he has reached 65,000 donors cross 20 states, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

Source: The Daily Caller

Evie Fordham | Politics and Health Care Reporter

  • Freshman Sens. Rick Scott of Florida and Mike Braun of Indiana are the cosponsors of the Banning Lobbying and Safeguarding Trust (BLAST) Act.
  • Scott and Braun want to put an end to lawmakers stepping into the so-called “revolving door of K Street” — using their connections to become well-heeled lobbyists once they are out of office.
  • “I think that here you’d attract better people if you didn’t have them make a career out of it,” Braun told The Daily Caller News Foundation.

Republican Indiana Sen. Mike Braun, co-sponsor of a recently introduced bill banning ex-members of Congress from lobbying Congress, told The Daily Caller News Foundation in an interview his bill would help get Congress out of a “rut” — but he’s not expecting the legislation to gain traction anytime soon.

“I think that here you’d attract better people if you didn’t have them make a career out of it,” Braun said. “But so many incentives are put in place with pensions, the ability after you’re done to become a lobbyist, so you do nestle in, and then you start maybe not making the right long-term decisions. You basically make a decision: what will be best for me to nestle in further, be around here longer.”

Braun and Republican Florida Sen. Rick Scott are the cosponsors of the Banning Lobbying and Safeguarding Trust (BLAST) Act, introduced Feb. 28. Braun connected the legislation to his reform agenda, including doing away with taxpayer-funded pensions for members of Congress(RELATED: Two Senators Introduce Bill To Keep Members Of Congress From Cashing In As Lobbyists)

Although the lawmakers are “barking up the right tree,” their solution might not be realistic, a government transparency expert told TheDCNF.

(L-R) Incoming Senator Mike Braun, incoming Senator Mitt Romney, incoming Senator Josh Hawley, incoming Senator Marcha Blackburn, Florida Governor and Senatorial connate Rick Scott, and incoming Senator Kevin Cramer pose with Senate Majority Leader Senator Mitch McConnell (3rdR) before a meeting on Capitol Hill November 14, 2018 in Washington, DC. (BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

(L-R) Incoming Senator Mike Braun, incoming Senator Mitt Romney, incoming Senator Josh Hawley, incoming Senator Marcha Blackburn, Florida Governor and Senatorial connate Rick Scott, and incoming Senator Kevin Cramer pose with Senate Majority Leader Senator Mitch McConnell (3rdR) before a meeting on Capitol Hill November 14, 2018 in Washington, DC. (BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images)

“You generally do see more of a reform agenda from some of the newer members that come into the Senate or into the House. We’re hoping some of their policies actually gain traction and can be supported in a bipartisan way,” Scott Amey, general counsel at the Project on Government Oversight, said in a phone interview. “The public is tired of politics as usual.”

Scott and Braun want to put an end to lawmakers stepping into the so-called “revolving door of K Street.” Current law mandates ex-House members must wait a year to lobby their former colleagues, while ex-senators must wait two.

Few have voiced opposition to the BLAST Act, but Braun predicts “people from everywhere coming out against it” if it ever received a committee hearing. 

“Part of it would have to be where you grandfather the people that are here so you can get people to vote for it,” Braun said. “To be honest, there’s not enough urgency among the average individual here … That’s what we’ve had running the place the last three, four decades and look at the results.”

Scott and Braun’s bill could have unintended consequences, Bruce Mehlman of lobbying firm Mehlman Castagnetti Rosen & Thomas told TheDCNF.

“The bigger challenge is that registered lobbying represents only a small part of the total spent on influencing government policy, and this proposed law would merely encourage even more ex-Members to avoid disclosure while serving as ‘senior advisors,’ ‘strategists’ or ‘consultants at law and PR firms,’” Mehlman said in an email.

“Whenever you’ve got a system that is so ingrained like this one, I’m sure there will be resourceful ways to skirt,” Braun said in response. “If you craft good legislation from the get-go … you have a way to at least throw something out there as the first barricade.”

Braun also discussed President Donald Trump’s “Drain the Swamp” slogan, which the senator said he used some while campaigning.

“I think [Trump] just shook the system, like maybe on the Richter scale a seven earthquake, but not many buildings toppled,” Braun said.

Braun and Scott want to topple those buildings one at a time, although it’s slow-going. Both were in the small club of freshman senators who arrived on Capitol Hill for the start of the 116th Congress. They would always beat the other lawmakers to lunch by at least 15 minutes, and a friendship was born, Braun said.

“Scott said, ‘Oh yeah, I’ve always believed in being punctual,’ and I said, ‘Well, I just like to be the first one in the food line,’” Braun said with a laugh.

They’ve worked on numerous reform-minded pieces of legislation together, including a bill introduced during the partial government shutdown to cut off congressional salaries if Congress fails to pass a budget. It gathered more than 10 cosponsors.

“I think until Scott and I got here a lot of people spoke about it in their campaigns, but we’re in here actually dropping bills. That’s the difference,” Braun said.

Braun is serving his first term in the Senate after beating former Democratic Indiana Sen. Joe Donnelly in a close race during the 2018 midterm elections. A former state representative, Braun grew his father’s automotive parts business Meyer Distributing and has a multimillion-dollar net worth. He self-funded his Senate campaign through the Republican primary, reported The Indianapolis Business Journal.

Follow Evie on Twitter @eviefordham.

Send tips to [email protected].

Content created by The Daily Caller News Foundation is available without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a large audience. For licensing opportunities of our original content, please contact [email protected].

Source: The Daily Caller

A Wells Fargo logo is seen in New York City
A Wells Fargo logo is seen in New York City, U.S. January 10, 2017. REUTERS/Stephanie Keith

March 17, 2019

By David French

(Reuters) – Principal Financial Group Inc is in advanced talks to acquire Wells Fargo & Co’s retirement plan services business, in a deal that could exceed $1 billion, people familiar with the matter said on Sunday.

Wells Fargo has been seeking to streamline its business as it grapples with the fallout of customer abuse scandals. The bank is prohibited from growing in size after the Federal Reserve slapped it with an unprecedented asset cap in February 2018, citing “widespread consumer abuses and compliance breakdowns.”

The bank’s retirement plan services unit, which includes Wells’ 401(k) savings accounts business, would expand a similar business of Principal Financial. If the negotiations are concluded successfully, a deal could be announced later this month, according to the sources, who spoke on condition of anonymity as the information is confidential.

Wells Fargo and Principal Financial declined to comment.

Based in Des Moines, Iowa, Principal Financial is a life insurance and financial services group with a market capitalization of $14.5 billion.

It is the latest in a series of divestments pursued by Wells Fargo.

In 2018, Wells Fargo announced deals to sell 52 branches spread across Indiana, Michigan, Ohio and Wisconsin to Flagstar Bancorp Inc, as well as a $1.7 billion deal to offload its Puerto Rico auto finance business to the local unit of Popular Inc.

The disclosure three years ago that Wells Fargo created millions of fake customer accounts prompted regulatory probes into mortgage foreclosures, auto insurance sales and its wealth management businesses, resulting in billions of dollars in fines.

(Reporting by David French in New York; Editing by Peter Cooney)

Source: OANN

O'Rourke, the Democratic former Texas congressman, addresses supporters before a march in El Paso
Beto O’Rourke, the Democratic former Texas congressman, addresses supporters before an anti-Trump march in El Paso, Texas, U.S., February 11, 2019. REUTERS/Loren Elliott

March 17, 2019

By James Oliphant

MOUNT VERNON, Iowa (Reuters) – As he had done at several stops in his first campaign trip as a presidential candidate, Beto O’Rourke on Friday climbed atop a counter at a local Iowa business and addressed a small but adoring crowd. People clapped and cheered. Outside, some waited in the cold, hoping to catch a glimpse of him. 

By that measure, his tour across eastern Iowa last week was largely a success. But by no means was O’Rourke considered a front-runner. And that underscored the challenge he faces as he competes for the 2020 Democratic nomination.

O’Rourke, a former three-term U.S. congressman from Texas, became a celebrity last year when his longshot bid to unseat U.S. Senator Ted Cruz drew national attention and a torrent of money. But ultimately, his fame was not enough.

That loss led some critics to wonder why someone who couldn’t secure a Senate seat would then think he should run for president.

That is not his only obstacle. O’Rourke, 46, is a wealthy, white man from a conservative-leaning state who is more moderate on several key issues than many of his competitors. Given the energy among progressives in the early stages of the race and the diversity of the Democratic field, O’Rourke would appear to be everything that many in party say they do not want.

More than a dozen Democrats have declared their candidacy to take on President Donald Trump in next year’s election, including six women. U.S. Senator Kamala Harris of California would make history as the first black woman to gain the nomination. Julian Castro, a former secretary of the Department of Housing and Urban Development, would be the first Hispanic to do so. Another contender, Pete Buttigieg, the mayor of South Bend, Indiana, is openly gay.

O’Rourke also must grapple with the enduring popularity of U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders, a progressive who remains a formidable adversary after battling Hillary Clinton in 2016, and former Vice President Joe Biden, who is weighing a presidential bid.

Even so, none of them are on the cover of the latest issue of Vanity Fair, as O’Rourke is. His interview with the magazine sparked controversy on social media last week when he said he was “born” to run for president. Critics also found fault with his oft-repeated joke on the trail about how he “helps” raise his three children with his wife, Amy.

To his detractors, it smacked of white male privilege. O’Rourke grew up affluent, attended the Ivy League’s Columbia University, and married the daughter of a real estate baron. His estimated net personal wealth is more than $9 million.

His image in his race against Cruz, however, belied that background. He fashioned himself as the scrappy underdog, a former punk rocker who was battling the establishment, visiting every county in Texas in a Dodge minivan and holding numerous town halls where he fielded questions from the public.

It was a strategy he took to Iowa last week, going so far as to rent another Dodge minivan that he drove himself and shooting a fundraising video on Facebook of him filling its gas tank.

O’Rourke differed from many of his liberal competitors by talking frequently about how he worked with Republicans in Congress to improve care for veterans in his home town of El Paso, Texas. Asked whether he was a true “progressive,” he referenced President Theodore Roosevelt, a Republican.

O’Rourke maintained that his campaign would be relentlessly optimistic – and he only rarely rebuked Trump. “We will not belittle or demean or vilify other candidates,” he said in Mt. Vernon. “We will not define ourselves in contrast to others or say who we are against.”

His policy positions were largely nonspecific. He championed universal health care, immigration reform and combating climate change, but largely said any reforms would have to be pragmatic and incremental.

Occasionally, O’Rourke showed self-awareness of his status as a wealthy, white male, telling crowds that he had been given opportunities denied to minorities and describing the U.S. economic system as imperfect and racist.

He also found that despite the media attention he has received, he was not a household name in Iowa. “I didn’t even know who he was until two days ago,” said Sam Jennison, the owner of the bar in Mount Vernon where O’Rourke held his event.

But for the most part, those who attended his events spoke of him glowingly and dismissed concerns about whether he was progressive enough. “Issues are very important,” said Cathryn Layer, 65, of New London, Iowa. “Winnability is another thing.”

“We need a moderate Democrat, and we probably need a white male because that is not threatening to a lot of people,” said Holly Manon Moore, 65, of Fairfield, Iowa, who said she is undecided in the race and would want a person of color to be the vice-presidential nominee. “If we go too far left, we’re going to lose.”

At the close of his Iowa trip, it remained unclear how O’Rourke’s entrance would reshape the Democratic race. He notably declined to reveal how much money he raised in his first few days as a candidate.

But he did have an impact. At the same time O’Rourke was in eastern Iowa, so was one of his competitors, U.S. Senator Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota. And while the size of the crowd that came to see her on Saturday was comparable to those at O’Rourke’s events, there were far fewer journalists present.

(Reporting by James Oliphant; Editing by Daniel Wallis)

Source: OANN

NBA: Portland Trail Blazers at San Antonio Spurs
Mar 16, 2019; San Antonio, TX, USA; Portland Trail Blazers shooting guard CJ McCollum (3) drives for the basket between San Antonio Spurs power forward LaMarcus Aldridge (12) and DeMar DeRozan (right) during the first half at AT&T Center. Mandatory Credit: Soobum Im-USA TODAY Sports

March 17, 2019

DeMar DeRozan’s 21 points led seven San Antonio players in double figures as the Spurs made all the big plays in the fourth quarter to beat the visiting Portland Trail Blazers 108-103 on Saturday for their eighth straight victory.

The sixth-place Spurs are a season-best 12 games over .500 and within a game and a half of Portland for fourth place in the Western Conference standings.

Rudy Gay and Derrick White added 13 points each for San Antonio, with LaMarcus Aldridge and Patty Mills scoring 12 points each. DeRozan and Aldridge had eight rebounds apiece, Gay had seven, and Jakob Poeltl blocked five shots.

Portland’s Damian Lillard led all scorers with 34 points, and Jusuf Nurkic added 24 points and 16 rebounds. CJ McCollum, who finished with 10 points, left in the third quarter with an apparent left knee injury during a drive to the basket.

Warriors 110, Thunder 88

Stephen Curry scored 33 points and Klay Thompson added 23 as Golden State scored 40 points in the first quarter in defeating host Oklahoma City.

DeMarcus Cousins added 12 points, eight rebounds and six assists for the Warriors, who also got eight rebounds and six assists from Draymond Green.

Paul George led Oklahoma City with 29 points but hit only 9 of 25 shots overall. Dennis Schroder added 15 points off the bench, and Russell Westbrook shot only 2 of 16 in finishing with seven points.

Nuggets 102, Pacers 100

Paul Millsap hit a running layup with seven seconds left as host Denver edged Indiana to stay a game behind Golden State for the No. 1 seed in the Western Conference.

Millsap finished with 15 points and 13 rebounds. Nikola Jokic scored 26 points before being ejected for arguing a foul call on a loose ball play. Jamal Murray and Will Barton scored 17 points each for Denver.

Thaddeus Young had 18 points and 10 rebounds, Darren Collison scored 17 points and Domantas Sabonis and Bojan Bogdanovic finished with 16 each for the Pacers.

Jazz 114, Nets 98

Rudy Gobert totaled 23 points, 17 rebounds and three blocked shots, and Utah took control by early in the second quarter to defeat Brooklyn in Salt Lake City.

Gobert recorded his 55th double-double. He shot 9 of 12 from the floor and had six more dunks, increasing his league-leading total to 249. Donovan Mitchell led Utah with 24 points and added six rebounds and four assists.

Spencer Dinwiddie scored 22 points off the bench, but the Nets dropped to 0-2 to start a season-high, seven-game road trip. D’Angelo Russell added 20 points but shot 8 of 25 for Brooklyn.

Celtics 129, Hawks 120

Kyrie Irving scored 30 points and Jaylen Brown added 23, with two key baskets in a fourth-quarter stretch, as host Boston held off Atlanta to win for the fifth time in its past six games.

Irving fell just short of his second straight triple-double with 11 rebounds and nine assists. Boston also got 19 points — four in the crucial fourth-quarter run — and 11 rebounds from Marcus Morris while Jayson Tatum had 18 points and eight rebounds. Marcus Smart scored 16 points.

Atlanta was led by Trae Young, who had 26 points, including 5-for-8 shooting on 3-pointers, and John Collins, who had 20 points and 11 rebounds.

Wizards 135, Grizzlies 128

Bradley Beal led six players in double figures with 40 points — his second straight night reaching 40 — as host Washington defeated Memphis.

Jabari Parker had 20 points and 11 rebounds, and Bobby Portis scored 18 points as Washington, 11th in the Eastern Conference, moved to within three games of eighth-place Miami.

Mike Conley had 28 points and 12 assists for Memphis. Jonas Valanciunas amassed 22 points, and Avery Bradley scored 21.

Mavericks 121, Cavaliers 116

Tim Hardaway Jr. led seven players in double figures with 22 points as host Dallas ran off to a big lead before holding on to beat Cleveland and end a seven-game losing streak.

Maxi Kleber finished with 18 points and 12 rebounds for the Mavericks, and Jalen Brunson and Dwight Powell added 16 points apiece. Dirk Nowitzki contributed 14 points and six rebounds.

Rookie Collin Sexton scored a game-high 28 points, and Kevin Love and Cedi Osman added 22 apiece. Love also had 12 rebounds and four assists.

Suns 138, Pelicans 136 (OT)

Phoenix scored five points in the final 2.2 seconds of overtime, helped along when host New Orleans drew a technical foul for calling a timeout when it had none remaining. Devin Booker led the Suns with 40 points and 13 assists, and Kelly Oubre Jr. had 32 points.

The Pelicans lost their sixth straight despite getting a New Orleans-record fourth consecutive triple-double from Elfrid Payton. The former Suns point guard finished with 16 points, 13 rebounds and a career-high 16 assists, tying the assist mark he set one night earlier against Portland.

Three of his teammates had double-doubles. Julius Randle finished with 21 points and 11 rebounds, Anthony Davis had 15 points and 11 rebounds, and Cheick Diallo came off the bench to add 10 points and 10 rebounds.

–Field Level Media

Source: OANN

NBA: Milwaukee Bucks at Miami Heat
Mar 15, 2019; Miami, FL, USA; Milwaukee Bucks forward Giannis Antetokounmpo (34) and Miami Heat guard Josh Richardson (0) both reach for a rebound during the second half at American Airlines Arena. Mandatory Credit: Steve Mitchell-USA TODAY Sports

March 16, 2019

The Milwaukee Bucks overcame a 23-point first-quarter deficit to rally past the host Miami Heat 113-98 on Friday night.

Giannis Antetokounmpo tallied 33 points, 16 rebounds and nine assists, giving him his 49th double-double. Khris Middleton and Eric Bledsoe had 21 and 17 points, respectively, for the Bucks, who top the NBA with 52 wins, including 25 on the road.

The Bucks outscored the Heat 71-36 in the second half to seize control of the game, and Milwaukee won its league-best 16th game when trailing by more than 10 points in a game this season. The Bucks won for the first time ever in 78 tries when trailing by at least 20 points at the half.

Justise Winslow scored 20 — all in the first half — and Hassan Whiteside had 14. Josh Richardson scored 11, while Dwyane Wade, Bam Adebayo, Dion Waiters and Kelly Olynyk each had 10 for the Heat, who have won six of their past nine.

Rockets 108, Suns 102

James Harden recorded a double-double, with his final assist resulting in a critical basket that helped cement Houston’s win over visiting Phoenix.

Harden posted 41 points and 11 assists and finished a rebound shy of a triple-double. He added six steals, but his final assist, a pass that resulted in a Danuel House Jr. 3-pointer with just under a minute left, provided the Rockets a 105-100 lead and sealed their 10th win in 11 games.

House, seeing his first action since Jan. 14 after a contract dispute punched his ticket back to the G-League, scored 18 points and finished 4 of 8 from behind the arc.

Spurs 109, Knicks 83

LaMarcus Aldridge scored 18 points and grabbed 11 rebounds in three quarters to lead a balanced scoring attack as San Antonio throttled visiting New York to capture its seventh straight victory.

The Spurs (40-29) have used their winning streak to fly up in the Western Conference standings and to move 11 games above .500, their best mark of the season.

San Antonio posted its ninth consecutive victory at home and dominated the hapless Knicks, who have the NBA’s worst record at 13-56 and have lost eight games in a row.

76ers 123, Kings 114

All five starters scored 18 or more points, propelling Philadelphia over visiting Sacramento.

Joel Embiid had 21 points and a game-high 17 rebounds, while teammate Jimmy Butler collected seven assists to complement a game-high 22 points as the 76ers (44-25) moved back into a tie with idle Indiana (44-25) for the No. 3 playoff position in the Eastern Conference.

Sacramento (33-35) lost a third straight contest, including its second in two nights. The Kings were beaten 126-120 at Boston on Thursday.

Trail Blazers 122, Pelicans 110

Damian Lillard and C.J. McCollum combined for 47 points as visiting Portland held off short-handed New Orleans.

Lillard scored 24 points and passed current Spurs forward LaMarcus Aldridge for second place on Portland’s all-time scoring list. Clyde Drexler is the Blazers’ all-time leading scorer.

McCollum finished with 23 points, Enes Kanter and Rodney Hood added 17 points each, Zach Collins scored 12, and Jusuf Nurkic had 11 points and 12 rebounds as the Blazers improved to 8-3 since the All-Star break.

Clippers 128, Bulls 121

Danilo Gallinari scored 27 points, and Los Angeles continued to better its playoff chances with a win over visiting Chicago.

Montrezl Harrell scored 26 points off the bench, and Lou Williams had 21 in a reserve role for the Clippers, who remain tied for eighth in the Western Conference with the Utah Jazz. Los Angeles also moved six games ahead of the ninth-place Kings for the final playoff spot.

Shai Gilgeous-Alexander had 17 points, seven rebounds and seven assists, and fellow point guard Patrick Beverley finished with 13 points, eight rebounds and seven assists for Los Angeles, which has won six of seven.

Lakers 111, Pistons 97

Langston Galloway scored 23 points off the bench, one shy of his season high, and host Detroit downed depleted Los Angeles.

The Pistons snapped a two-game losing streak, while the Lakers lost for the seventh time in eight games. Reggie Jackson had 20 points, five rebounds and five assists, while Andre Drummond powered for 19 points and 23 rebounds for the Pistons.

The Lakers rested superstar forward LeBron James after he scored 29 points in a loss to Toronto on Thursday. Tyson Chandler (neck), Josh Hart (knee) and Lance Stephenson (toe) also sat out.

Hornets 116, Wizards 110

Kemba Walker scored 28 points, Jeremy Lamb added 18 and visiting Charlotte defeated Washington.

Nicolas Batum and Tony Parker had 16 points each for the Hornets in a game between two of the teams chasing the Miami Heat for the final playoff berth in the Eastern Conference. Walker was coming off a 40-point effort in a loss to the Rockets.

Bradley Beal, who had 15 points in a loss at Charlotte last Friday, had 23 by halftime Friday night and finished with 40 points on 15-of-29 shooting.

–Field Level Media

Source: OANN

Former Starbucks CEO and possible candidate for president Howard Schultz on Thursday apologized for saying he had spent more time talking to military servicemembers than any other candidate, including two veterans.

“I probably have spent more time in the last decade certainly than anyone running for president with the military,” Schultz said in an interview on Hugh Hewitt’s radio show Thursday morning. “I’ve been to Okinawa, I’ve been to Kuwait. … I’ve been to the national training center in the Mojave Desert.”

“Yesterday I gave a speech on failed political leadership in this country,” Schultz tweeted Thursday afternoon. “A point I tried to make is that leaders must take responsibility and own their mistakes. Today I said I spent more time with the military than any candidate running for president. That was wrong.”

Pete Buttigieg, and Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, D-Hawaii, are the two veterans running for the Democratic nomination in 2020. Gabbard is a member of the Army National Guard and served in both Iraq and Kuwait, and Buttigieg is the mayor of South Bend, Indiana and a lieutenant in the U.S. Navy Reserve who served in Afghanistan

Butigieg mocked Schultz for his statement later that same day.

“I remember a Green Beans Coffee at the exchange at Bagram, and a decent espresso machine run by the Italian NATO element at ISAF HQ. But I don’t recall seeing any Starbucks over there…,” he tweeted.

Source: NewsMax

NBA: Sacramento Kings at Boston Celtics
Mar 14, 2019; Boston, MA, USA; Boston Celtics guard Kyrie Irving (11) takes a free throw during the second half against the Sacramento Kings at TD Garden. Mandatory Credit: Greg M. Cooper-USA TODAY Sports

March 15, 2019

Kyrie Irving scored six of his team-high 31 points during a fourth-quarter spurt that allowed the Boston Celtics to build a lead they were able to retain en route to a 126-120 victory over the visiting Sacramento Kings on Thursday night.

After trailing for much of the first three quarters, the Celtics led just 104-103 following a Willie Cauley-Stein dunk for Sacramento with 6:20 to go. Irving countered immediately with a floater and, after a three-point play by Marcus Morris, added two jumpers in a 9-0 flurry that opened a 113-103 advantage with 4:33 remaining.

Irving wound up with his second career triple-double, complementing his 31 points with 10 rebounds and a game-high 12 assists. His only previous triple-double came for Cleveland against Utah in February 2014.

Sacramento’s Buddy Hield led all scorers with 34 points, connecting on 6 of 10 3-point attempts. His Kings teammates, however, made just 5 of 24 3-point shots.

Raptors 111, Lakers 98

Kawhi Leonard scored 25 points, grabbed eight rebounds and added four assists as Toronto defeated visiting Los Angeles.

Norman Powell added 20 points and eight rebounds for the Raptors, who have won their past nine games against the Lakers dating to 2015. Pascal Siakam scored 16 points, and Marc Gasol contributed 15 points for Toronto.

LeBron James led the Lakers with 29 points. Alex Caruso added 16 points, Rajon Rondo had 13 points and eight assists and JaVale McGee contributed nine points and nine rebounds.

Pacers 108, Thunder 106

Wesley Matthews’ tip-in with 1.8 seconds left lifted Indiana over host Oklahoma City.

Indiana ended the game on a 23-10 run to finish off a big comeback. Domantas Sabonis led the Pacers with 26 points, and Bojan Bogdanovic added 23.

Russell Westbrook had a chance to win the game for the Thunder in the last second, but his 3-pointer from the top of the key hit the front of the rim and bounced away. Westbrook finished with 19 points, 14 rebounds and 11 assists for his second consecutive triple-double, and Paul George finished with a game-high 36 points.

Magic 120, Cavaliers 91

Aaron Gordon had 21 points as Orlando got a much-needed blowout against visiting Cleveland.

Nikola Vucevic had 19 points and 11 rebounds, and D.J. Augustin had 20 points and seven assists for the Magic. The win came at an important time for Orlando, which had dropped four of its last five games.

Collin Sexton led the Cavaliers with 23 points, and Jordan Clarkson added 15 points off the bench.

Jazz 120, Timberwolves 100

Donovan Mitchell scored 24 points and dished out six assists to lead Utah past Minnesota at Salt Lake City.

Rudy Gobert and Derrick Favors each finished with double-doubles for the Jazz. Favors had 17 points and 11 rebounds. Gobert tallied 10 points and 13 boards. Jae Crowder added 18 points off the bench.

Karl-Anthony Towns scored 26 points and collected 12 rebounds before fouling out with 4:13 left. Andrew Wiggins added 14 points. Tyus Jones chipped in 12 points and nine assists.

Nuggets 100, Mavericks 99

Nikola Jokic drained a 9-foot leaner as time expired, and host Denver rallied to beat Dallas.

Jokic one-upped Dallas rookie Luka Doncic, whose dunk with 5.8 seconds left gave Dallas a one-point lead. But Denver called timeout, then got the ball to Jokic, and he hit a floater around Dwight Powell.

Jokic finished with 11 points, 14 rebounds and eight assists, and Paul Millsap had a season-high 33 points for Denver. Doncic had 24 points and Jalen Brunson scored 20 for the tired Mavericks, who didn’t arrive in Denver until 9 a.m. Thursday because of the blizzard slamming much of the middle of the country.

–Field Level Media

Source: OANN

Virginia Kruta | Associate Editor

Vice President Mike Pence’s press secretary had some choice words for Democratic California Sen. Kamala Harris regarding Pence’s “no women alone” policy.

Harris told NBC’s Andrea Mitchell that Pence’s well-known “no one-on-one meetings with women” rule would be detrimental for women, suggesting that by denying women the chance to meet with him one-on-one was the same as denying women the chance to meet with him at all. (RELATED: No Facts? No Problem: Feminists Attack VP Mike Pence And United Airlines For Sexism)

WATCH:

Farah quickly fired back at Harris, saying, “Hi, @SenKamalaHarris: I’m a female Senior Advisor to Mike Pence [and] am wondering why you are repeating this false claim? He’s elevated women to positions of leadership throughout his career [and] relies on their advice [and] counsel. Get your facts straight.”

Pence has received a fair amount of criticism, primarily from Democrats, since a 2002 interview with The Hill resurfaced in which the former Indiana governor said he “never eats alone with a woman other than his wife and that he won’t attend events featuring alcohol without her by his side, either.”

Follow Virginia on Twitter

Source: The Daily Caller

WASHINGTON — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said at her weekly press conference Thursday she personally would support lowering the national voting age to 16.

“I myself, personally, not speaking for my caucus, I myself have always been for lowering the voting age to 16,” Pelosi said when asked by The Daily Caller about her thoughts on the issue. “I think it’s really important to capture kids when they’re in high school when they’re interested in all of this and learning about government to be able to vote.”

“Some of the priorities in this bill are about transparency, openness, and accessibility, and the rest,” she added. “That’s a subject of debate and I would welcome it, but I’ve held this position for a long time.”

(Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

U.S. Speaker of the House Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) arrives at a news conference at the U.S. Capitol January 4, 2019 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)

The issue of lowering the voting age came up for debate in the House as an amendment last week on the  “For The People Act,” a Democratic pushed bill (H.R. 1) that would overhaul U.S. election and campaign finance laws. Democratic Massachusetts Rep. Ayanna Pressley introduced the amendment, but it failed 126-305. (RELATED: 125 Democrats And 1 Republican Vote To Lower Voting Age To 16)

Since 2013, thirteen states have proposed bills to lower the voting age. Some of the proposals are strictly for school board elections while others are for state elections.

H.R. 1, however, did pass the House through its Democratic majority, despite opposition from the ACLU. (RELATED: ACLU Joins McConnell And Trump Administration In Opposing Democrats’ ‘For The People Act’)

The ACLU, pointing to the DISCLOSE section of the bill, said it would “unconstitutionally infringe the freedoms of speech and association.” That section requires the disclosure of “names and addresses of donors who gave $10,000 or more to organizations that engage in ‘campaign-related disbursements,’ which includes electioneering communications and independent expenditures.”

WILMINGTON, NC - MAY 6: Voters cast their ballots at the Williston Middle School polling station the morning of May 6, 2008 in Wilmington, North Carolina. Voters in Indiana and North Carolina have their primary polls May 6. (Photo by Logan Mock-Bunting/Getty Images)

WILMINGTON, NC – MAY 6: Voters cast their ballots at the Williston Middle School polling station the morning of May 6, 2008 in Wilmington, North Carolina. Voters in Indiana and North Carolina have their primary polls May 6. (Photo by Logan Mock-Bunting/Getty Images)

“I disagree with the ACLU on this. In terms of legislation, we couldn’t be prouder of H.R. 1.” Pelosi said when asked by the Caller about the ACLU’s concerns. “This is about reducing the role of big dark special interest money in politics and empowering small donors. It’s about making districting fairer. It’s really a source of joy and hope to so many people in the country.”

Follow Kerry on Twitter

Kerry Picket is a host on SiriusXM Patriot 125

Source: The Daily Caller

Farm equipment and grain storage belonging to farmer Austin Rincker sit outside in Moweaqua Illinois
Farm equipment and grain storage belonging to farmer Austin Rincker sit outside in Moweaqua, Illinois, U.S., March 6, 2019. Rincker will farm approximately 2500 acres in the upcoming season, split evenly between corn and soybeans. Picture taken March 6, 2019. REUTERS/Daniel Acker

March 14, 2019

By Mark Weinraub

CHICAGO (Reuters) – U.S. farmers are gearing up to plant what could be their third-largest soybean crop ever despite failing to sell a mountain of beans from their last harvest due to a U.S.-China trade war that remains unresolved.

Soybeans were the single most valuable U.S. agricultural export crop and until the trade war, China bought $12 billion-worth a year from American farmers.

But Chinese tariffs have almost halted the trade, taking the biggest buyer out of the market and leaving farmers with crops they cannot sell. The U.S. government estimates farmers will have 900 million bushels, or approximately $8 billion, of last year’s soybeans in storage silos around the country when they start harvesting the next crop.

The U.S. government rolled out a $12 billion farm aid package last year to soften the impact of falling revenue on farmers, an important source of votes for U.S. President Donald Trump.

As winter ends and farmers begin planting, they will continue to plant soy despite uncertainty over whether they will be able to sell beans to China later this year. There are simply no better options, farmers say. (Graphic: https://tmsnrt.rs/2TkUDjk)

“It is tough to rotate out of soybeans because what else are you going to plant?” said Darin Anderson, a 41-year-old farmer from Valley City, North Dakota.

One alternative, sorghum, was also dragged into the trade war. Farmers also could increase their corn acreage but the corn-based ethanol industry is struggling. Additionally, farmers who plant corn on the same fields two years in a row need to buy extra fertilizer and fuel.

Alternative niche crops such as hemp are expensive to start growing and have limited markets.

“Farmers have made long-term investments whether it is equipment or storage,” said Josh Gackle, a 44-year-old farmer from Kulm, North Dakota.

“All that is very specialized and the transition to something else takes a new set of investments.”

That means farmers will plant soybeans in the hope that the trade war ends, or that they will be compensated by another bailout or crop insurance schemes.

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) forecasts farmers will sow 85 million acres of the oilseed this spring. That is down just 4.6 percent from last year and would be the third largest U.S. area planted with soybeans.

The USDA expects soybean prices will fall in 2019 due to tariffs and rising supply. But soybean futures prices have performed relatively well, considering the disruption to markets from tariffs. The price is up 5.3 percent since China imposed a 25 percent tariff in July. That means many growers have made a slim profit from seeding soybeans.

“It is not a lot of gravy by any means,” said Austin Rincker, a 30-year-old farmer from Moweaqua, Illinois. “But with a good crop, we could still maintain some profitability.”

Rincker is aiming for a 50-50 split between corn and soybeans on his farm after a similar division in 2018. Any further increase in corn would add to his expenses, he said.

Growers are also confident their government-subsidized crop insurance plans will soften the blow if soy prices fall.

Farmers pay for their individual insurance policies, which provides a minimum price they will receive when they book sales for their crops. The federal government funds around 60 percent of the insurance payouts.

“It is nice to know it is there,” said Art Bunting, an Illinois farmer who typically opts for plans that cover 85 percent of expected revenue, the maximum amount offered under the plans.

The 2019 crop insurance price for soybeans was set at $9.54 a bushel based on the futures market activity during February, a rate 62 cents lower than last year. The November soybean futures contract, which is used to determine the crop insurance price, had dropped 18 cents below that level by the middle of March.

As well as the insurance, farmers were able to tap the government aid program to boost the profit on their 2018 crop. The bulk of the program’s budget was devoted to soybean claims. The USDA has said repeatedly the package was a one-off deal.

‘BLOODY OUT HERE’

The economic future of U.S. farmers is in the hands of U.S. and Chinese negotiators working to end the trade war, said Bob Utterback, president of consultancy Utterback Marketing.

“It’s going to be bloody out here in farm country,” without a trade deal, he said.

The USDA expects China’s annual soy imports to fall this year for the first time since 2004. China has booked just 11.0 million tonnes of U.S. soybean shipments since the marketing year started on Sept. 1, 2018, down from 28.2 million at the same point a year ago. The country’s total soy imports for the year are expected to be 6.5 percent below last year.

A fast-spreading outbreak of African swine fever reported in 28 provinces and regions has led to mass culling and reduced China’s demand for hog feed. China has also tried to boost the amount of alternative feeds used in livestock rations to reduce its dependence on U.S. imports.

But many farmers are convinced China will have to return to the U.S. market because even if it succeeds in reducing soymeal demand as Chinese demand for soybeans has more than tripled in the past 15 years.

And Beijing has promised 10 million more tonnes of goodwill purchases as part of the trade negotiations, U.S. officials have said.

“I think the demand will continue,” said Roger Hadley, a 66-year-old Indiana farmer who is aiming to divide his 1,000 acres evenly between soybeans and corn this spring.

“Their folks have got that taste in their diet.”

(Reporting by Mark Weinraub; Additional reporting by P.J. Huffstutter; Editing by Caroline Stauffer, Simon Webb and Lisa Shumaker)

Source: OANN

Benjamin Fox | Contributor

Temetrius Jamel “Ja” Morant defeated Belmont 77-65 in the championship game of the Ohio Valley Tournament, ensuring his team a spot in the NCAA Tournament.

Notice I said Morant defeated Belmont — not Murray State. For anyone who has watched them play, it is clear the offense has one goal: get the ball to Morant. (RELATED: Lipscomb Takes Shot At Indiana On Twitter Prior To March Madness)

Morant is truly something special. In fact, he is the first player in NCAA history to average 20 points and 10 assists in the same season. Although he is still being projected as the second-best prospect in the NBA draft, behind Duke’s Zion Williamson.

To me, this guy has to get more recognition than he’s getting, especially with the injury to Williamson. Don’t get me wrong, I love me some Zion, but if Morant continues to play the way he has played and leads his team to a deep run in the tournament, I think you have to seriously consider taking him with the first overall pick. (RELATED: Saint Mary’s Upsets Top-Ranked Gonzaga In WCC Tournament Championship)

This March Madness looks to be one of the more exciting in recent memory. Could you imagine how exciting it will be if when Zion and Ja matchup in the round of 32?

Follow Benjamin Fox on Twitter

Source: The Daily Caller

David Hookstead | Reporter

Lipscomb needs to learn their place in the world of college basketball.

Lipscomb, a team currently in the next four out on ESPN’s bracketology, felt a need to take an unnecessary shot Tuesday afternoon at Indiana over the tournament bubble. The Hoosiers are currently in the first four out.

The Bison tweeted out a graphic comparing the two teams’ respective home records, quad one and two wins, road wins and NCAA scoring margin. Lipscomb won in every category, and it still really doesn’t matter.

Somebody apparently forgot to tell Lipscomb before this insanely idiotic and stupid tweet that Indiana plays in the Big Ten. The Hoosiers are in arguably the toughest conference in the whole country.

Do you know what conference Lipscomb is in? That’d be the A-Sun. Every single Big Ten team in the league would dominate in the A-Sun. (RELATED: Wisconsin Beats Penn State 61-57)

That’s a fact. It’s not even close to being comparable. Winning six games a year in the B1G would be more impressive than dominating the A-Sun.

If Lipscomb wants to get tough, then they can come play a dozen B1G opponents in the non-conference schedule next year.

Until then, shut the hell up and learn your place. The big dance is for the big dogs. It’s not for the little schools who couldn’t even win their own conference tournaments. There are no handouts in March. That’s just the way it is.

Source: The Daily Caller

NBA: Los Angeles Lakers at Chicago Bulls
Mar 12, 2019; Chicago, IL, USA; Los Angeles Lakers forward LeBron James (23) dunks the ball against the Chicago Bulls in the second half at the United Center. Mandatory Credit: Matt Marton-USA TODAY Sports

March 13, 2019

LeBron James had 36 points and 10 rebounds, and the visiting Los Angeles Lakers overcame their lowest-scoring first quarter of the season to end a five-game losing streak with a 123-107 win against the Chicago Bulls on Tuesday.

Kentavious Caldwell-Pope scored 24 points off the bench, Kyle Kuzma scored 21, Rajon Rondo had 14 points and 10 assists, and JaVale McGee finished with 10 points and 11 rebounds for the Lakers.

Robin Lopez scored 20 points, Otto Porter Jr. had 19 points and nine rebounds, and Kris Dunn finished with 18 points, seven rebounds and nine assists for Chicago. Ryan Arcidiacono started in place of leading scorer Zach LaVine (knee) and had 14 points and six assists.

The Lakers scored 16 points in the first quarter, and the Bulls closed with an 11-1 run to take an 18-point lead into the second quarter. Los Angeles went ahead for the first time since making the first basket of the game when Kuzma put in a layup for a 66-64 lead with 8:48 left in the third quarter.

Spurs 112, Mavericks 105

DeMar DeRozan scored 16 of his team-high 33 points in the first quarter and LaMarcus Aldridge had 10 of his 28 in the third to lead visiting San Antonio past Dallas.

Derrick White added 23 points and seven assists, and Davis Bertans dropped three 3-pointers, including two big ones in the fourth quarter. San Antonio ran its win streak to a season-best six games.

Dallas lost for a sixth consecutive game as rookie Luka Doncic, playing with a sore right knee, was limited to 12 points on 5-of-18 shooting. He was 1 of 7 from deep, a frustrating 1 of 9 from the free-throw line and committed nine of the Mavericks’ 14 turnovers. Jalen Brunson scored a career-high 34 points for Dallas.

Bucks 130, Pelicans 113

Giannis Antetokounmpo scored 24 points to lead six Milwaukee scorers in double figures in a win at New Orleans.

Khris Middleton added 23 points, Malcolm Brogdon scored 18, Eric Bledsoe and former Pelicans forward Nikola Mirotic had 14 each and Brook Lopez 13.

Elfrid Payton had his second consecutive triple-double for the Pelicans, who lost their fourth straight, finishing with 14 points, a career-high 15 rebounds and 11 assists. He is the first New Orleans player to have a triple-double in consecutive games since Chris Paul did it in 2008.

76ers 106, Cavaliers 99

Ben Simmons had 26 points, 10 rebounds and eight assists to lead host Philadelphia past Cleveland.

Joel Embiid added 17 points and 19 rebounds for his 50th double-double of the season. Embiid also blocked four shots. JJ Redick scored 17 points for the Sixers, who were without Jimmy Butler as he was held out for a planned rest day.

Collin Sexton paced the Cavaliers with 26 points while Cedi Osman added 18 and Jordan Clarkson had 13.

Pacers 103, Knicks 98

Bojan Bogdanovic scored 24 points as Indiana continued its home dominance of New York.

The Pacers rebounded from a pair of nationally televised double-digit defeats at Milwaukee and Philadelphia by beating the Knicks for the 13th time in their last 14 meetings in Indianapolis and completing their third season sweep of New York in the past five seasons.

The Knicks’ latest losing streak is at seven games. New York, which got 21 points from Emmanuel Mudiay, scored fewer than 100 points for the fourth straight game.

–Field Level Media

Source: OANN

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi has taken back an office on the House side of the U.S. Capitol that was previously given to Vice President Mike Pence.

According to NPR, the office on the first floor of the Capitol was given to Pence by former House Speaker Paul Ryan. After Ryan retired at the start of this year and Democrats took control of the chamber, Pelosi opted to reassign the office space.

Pence also has an office on the Senate side of the Capitol, where he serves as president of the Senate, so he rarely used the office Ryan gave to him.

NPR reported Pence's nameplate has been removed from above the door.

"Room assignments are reviewed and changed at the beginning of every Congress," a House Democratic aide told NPR.

Pence served in the House for 12 years, from 2001-2013, before becoming governor of Indiana. He was in that role until he was sworn in as vice president more than two years ago.

Source: NewsMax

Joe Biden speaks in Washington
Former Vice President Joe Biden addresses the International Association of Fire Fighters in Washington, U.S., March 12, 2019. REUTERS/Kevin Lamarque

March 12, 2019

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. Democrats have poured into the 2020 presidential race, lining up to join what has quickly become a crowded field of challengers vying for the party’s nomination to face President Donald Trump, the likely Republican nominee.

A diverse group that includes six U.S. senators have either launched campaigns or formed exploratory committees to begin raising money and hiring staff for a presidential run.

Democrats are still waiting on a decision from a few prominent potential candidates, including former Vice President Joe Biden and former Congressman Beto O’Rourke of Texas, while others, including former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Senator Sherrod Brown of Ohio, have opted not to run.

The list of declared contenders so far:

CORY BOOKER – Booker, 49, a black, second-term senator fromNew Jersey and former mayor of Newark, gained prominence in thefight over Brett Kavanaugh’s Supreme Court nomination. He announced his candidacy on Feb. 1, the first day of Black History Month, mentioning the impact of racial discrimination onhis family and saying he would focus on creating good jobs andreforming the criminal justice system.

PETE BUTTIGIEG – The mayor of South Bend, Indiana, launcheda campaign to become the first openly gay president on Jan. 23 with a call for a new generation of leadership to bring fresh approaches to problems. Buttigieg, 37, brushed off questions about his experience by highlighting the economic turnaround in his city.

JULIAN CASTRO – The secretary of housing and urban development under President Barack Obama joined the race onJan. 12 in his hometown of San Antonio, Texas, where he once served as mayor and city councilman. Castro, 44, the grandson of a Mexican immigrant, is so far the only Hispanic in the field. He has used his family’s personal story to criticize Trump’s border policies.

JOHN DELANEY – The former U.S. congressman from Marylandwas the first Democrat to enter the race in July 2017, long before most candidates began making their moves. Delaney, 55, has focused heavily on campaigning and organizing in Iowa, the state that will kick off the nominating fight in February 2020,making repeated trips there and visiting all 99 counties.

TULSI GABBARD – Gabbard, 37, is the first Hindu to serve in the U.S. House of Representatives. After announcing her run on Jan. 11, her campaign quickly became engulfed in controversy over her past anti-gay activism and statements, and the Hawaii congresswoman was forced to apologize. “In my past, I said andbelieved things that were wrong,” she said.

KIRSTEN GILLIBRAND – An outspoken leader in the #MeToomovement against sexual assault and harassment, the senator fromNew York announced her candidacy on Jan. 15 on “The Late Showwith Stephen Colbert.” Gillibrand, 52, has touted her rural roots in upstate New York and said she had proven her ability to win over more conservative rural voters. But so far she has gained very little support in opinion polls.

KAMALA HARRIS – Harris, 54, announced her candidacy on the holiday honoring slain civil rights leader Martin Luther King Jr. The daughter of immigrants from Jamaica and India has made a quick impact in a Democratic race that will be heavily influenced by women and minority voters. The first-term senatorfrom California drew record ratings on a CNN televised town hall and has moved into a solid third place in polls behind Biden and Bernie Sanders.

JOHN HICKENLOOPER – The 67-year-old former Colorado governor has positioned himself as a centrist and an experienced officeholder with business experience. During his two terms in office, Colorado’s economy soared and the Western state expanded healthcare, passed a gun control law and legalized marijuana. The former geologist and brewpub owner is one of two governors in the race and so far has refused to take corporate money for his political action committee.

JAY INSLEE – The Washington state governor entered the field on March 1 with a vow to make climate change a central issue. Inslee, 68, also has moved to put a moratorium on capital punishment and fully implement Obamacare, formally known as the Affordable Care Act, and accompanying expansion of Medicaid health coverage for the poor. He spent 15 years in Congress before being elected governor in 2012.

AMY KLOBUCHAR – Klobuchar, 58, was the first moderate in the Democratic field. She gained national attention when she sparred with Brett Kavanaugh during Senate hearings on his Supreme Court nomination. Now in her third six-year term as a senator for Minnesota, Klobuchar’s launch came amid news reports that staff in her Senate office were asked to do menial tasks, making it difficult to hire high-level campaign strategists.

BERNIE SANDERS – The senator from Vermont lost the Democratic nomination in 2016 to Hillary Clinton but jumped in for a second try on Feb. 19. In his first run, Sanders, 77, drew strong backing from younger voters who supported his proposals for free tuition at public colleges, a $15 minimum wage and universal healthcare, ideas he plans to reprise as he vies for the 2020 nomination. The campaign reported raising $10 million in the first week.

ELIZABETH WARREN – The 69-year-old senator fromMassachusetts, a leader of the party’s liberals and a fierce Wall Street critic who was instrumental in the creation of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, jumped into the race with a New Year’s Eve video release. On visits to states that hold early nominating contests such as Iowa and New Hampshire, she has focused on her populist economic message, promising to fightwhat she calls a rigged economic system that favors the wealthy.

MARIANNE WILLIAMSON – A self-help author and lecturer, she announced her campaign on Jan. 28. Williamson, 66, an antiwar activist and advocate for racial reconciliation, backs a $15-an-hour minimum wage, universal healthcare and a return to the Paris climate accord. She lost her previous foray into electoral politics, an independent bid for Congress in 2014 in California, coming in fourth.

ANDREW YANG – The entrepreneur launched his long-shot candidacy back in November 2017 around a single issue: the future of work in a post-industrial society and the threat that automation will eliminate millions of jobs. To deal with that challenge, Yang has proposed a Universal Basic Income of $1,000 a month for every American over the age of 18. Yang, 44, has no experience in politics and ran a series of startups before launching a nonprofit that helps aspiring entrepreneurs create jobs.

(Compiled by John Whitesides, Arlene Washington and Susan Heavey; editing by Colleen Jenkins and Jonathan Oatis)

Source: OANN

William Davis | Contributor

As head coach of the USA basketball team, basketball legend Bobby Knight found himself in some hot water in Puerto Rico in 1979.

Knight allegedly assaulted a police officer while preparing for the 1979 Pan American Games which took place in San Juan that year. Knight was convicted in absentia and sentenced to six months in jail. He was also fined $500. As it turns out, Knight never suffered either punishment. Although Knight did apologize, Puerto Rico’s attempt to extradite Knight to serve his sentence failed and it turns out the territory never cashed in on the $500 either. (RELATED: Bobby Knight Threw His Chair 34 Years Ago Today)

The Action Network’s Darren Rovell tweeted a photo of a $500 check made out to Puerto Rico from the U.S. Olympic Committee. Turns out, the check was never cashed. (RELATED: Former Indiana University Basketball Coach Bobby Knight To Appear At Trump Rally)

Now that’s something. I always knew Knight had a long history of controversy on and off the court, but for some reason I had never heard of this incident until I happened upon Rovell’s tweet.

In a career filled with legendary temper tantrums, this one often gets lost in the mix. But it is perhaps the most shocking occurrence of Knight’s career.

Follow William Davis on Twitter

Source: The Daily Caller

A Venezuelan expatriate condemned New York Democratic Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and other Democrats for promoting socialist policies.

“Socialism is what destroyed Venezuela. There’s nothing for free in the world. Somebody is going to have to pay for it. The people who will have to pay for it will end up being us — young people, millennials,” said Martino. (RELATED: Ocasio-Cortez Bungled Green New Deal’s Release. Her Staff Took Its Webpage Offline)

Martino was born and raised in Caracas, Venezuela. He moved to the United States in 2016 and is studying economics at Indiana University and Purdue University Indianapolis.


The views and opinions expressed in this commentary are those of the author and do not reflect the official position of The Daily Caller.

“America Uncensored” is a Daily Caller program dedicated to political stories dominating the news cycle. TheDC’s Stephanie Hamill is a straight shooter who isn’t afraid to tell you what she thinks.

Hamill has put the Left on blast for turning a blind eye to the violent MS-13 gang, talked about the Left’s war on white men and highlighted the dangers of socialized medicine in some of her recent monologues. Check out a few of Hamill’s other greatest videos and subscribe to our YouTube channel to avoid missing out.

SUBSCRIBE HERE!

NOW CHECK OUT The Daily Caller’s Most Popular Shows:

Would You Rather Date A Trump Supporter or MS-13 Gang Member?

‘Trophy Culture’ Hijacks New Jersey High School Cheer Squad

Fact Checking White House ‘Truth Seekers’ On North Korea

Follow Stephanie Hamill on Twitter

Source: The Daily Caller

Nick Sherman | Contributor

For almost his entire time in office since being elected in 2016, President Donald Trump has been subjected to Russian collusion theory.

Many people — both in politics and in the media — have partaken in peddling and sharing this theory that Trump colluded with Russians in order to win the 2016 presidential election.

Here is a list of some of the most prominent Trump-Russia collusion theorists out there:

1. Chris Hayes

BEVERLY HILLS, CA - FEBRUARY 17: Chris Hayes speaks during the 2019 Writers Guild Awards Beverly Hills, California. (Photo by Rich Fury/Getty Images for WGAw)

BEVERLY HILLS, CA – FEBRUARY 17: Chris Hayes speaks during the 2019 Writers Guild Awards Beverly Hills, California. (Photo by Rich Fury/Getty Images for WGAw)

MSNBC anchor Chris Hayes has made forays into the Russia collusion, telling Steven Colbert that he is a firm believer in collusion: “It walks like a duck, it talks like a duck, let’s indict the duck.”

2. Rachel Maddow

MUNCIE, IN - DECEMBER 02: Rachel Maddow , on December 2, 2011 in Muncie, Indiana. (Photo by Ron Hoskins/Getty Images)

MUNCIE, IN – DECEMBER 02: Rachel Maddow , on December 2, 2011 in Muncie, Indiana. (Photo by Ron Hoskins/Getty Images)

This other MSNBC host has a penchant for spending a decent amount of time on her show covering different details of supposed collusion. Even Left-leaning online journal The Intercept has said, “MSNBC’s Rachel Maddow sees a ‘Russia connection lurking around every corner.’”

3. Cenk Uygur

LOS ANGELES, CA - OCTOBER 21: (L-R) Cenk Uygur, Steven Olikara, and Tucker Carlson during Politicon 2018 (Photo by Rich Polk/Getty Images for Politicon )

LOS ANGELES, CA – OCTOBER 21: (L-R) Cenk Uygur, Steven Olikara, and Tucker Carlson during Politicon 2018 (Photo by Rich Polk/Getty Images for Politicon )

Cenk Uygur is the host of the Young Turks on YouTube. As a far-Left news personality, he has made predictions about how long Trump will stay in office, as well as how guilty Trump is when it comes to colluding with Russia.

4. The Krassenstein Brothers

The two brothers founded Hill Reporter and are the hosts of the Krassenpost podcast. They are vehement critics of Trump and constantly express their desire to see him impeached. They have additionally been propagators of the Russian-collusion theory. See their Twitters here and here.

5. Nancy Pelosi

WASHINGTON, DC - FEBRUARY 25: Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) (R) is joined by House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-MD) and other House Democrats for a news conference on the Privileged Resolution to Terminate President Donald Trump's emergency declaration February 25, 2019 (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) (R) is joined by House Majority Leader Steny Hoyer (D-MD) … (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi has also been a peddler of the Russian-collusion theory, saying, “There’s no escaping it: the Trump Campaign’s inner circle met with an agent of a hostile foreign power to influence the outcome of an American election,” as reported by the independent.

So, you decide who the biggest Russia-collusion conspiracy theorist is. Feel free to debate in the comments or add new people who you think should have made it on this list.

Source: The Daily Caller

NBA: Phoenix Suns at Golden State Warriors
Mar 10, 2019; Oakland, CA, USA; Phoenix Suns guard Devin Booker (1) controls the ball between Golden State Warriors guard Klay Thompson (11) and forward Draymond Green (23) during the fourth quarter at Oracle Arena. Mandatory Credit: Kelley L Cox-USA TODAY Sports

March 11, 2019

Devin Booker’s jumper with 5:01 remaining gave Phoenix the lead for good Sunday night as the Suns snapped an 18-game losing streak to the Golden State Warriors with a 115-111 victory in Oakland, Calif.

Playing the second night of a back-to-back, the Suns found the energy to outlast the Warriors after having trailed by as many as 16 points.

The Suns hadn’t beaten the Warriors since November 2014, and hadn’t won in Oakland since February 2011. The loss was the Warriors’ second in six days, sandwiching a 122-105 home win over Denver on Friday.

Booker finished with a game-high 37 points, including 13 consecutive Suns points during a stretch of the fourth quarter in which Phoenix took charge of the game. Klay Thompson had 28 points and Kevin Durant 25 for the Warriors.

76ers 106, Pacers 89

Joel Embiid returned from an eight-game absence to score 33 points and grab 12 rebounds as host Philadelphia defeated Indiana.

Embiid had been out with a sore left knee but came back to post his league-best 49th double-double of the season as the Sixers snapped a two-game losing streak.

With the win, the Sixers moved into third place in the Eastern Conference, holding a tiebreaker over the Pacers. Bojan Bogdanovic led the Pacers with 18 points while Darren Collison added 14.

Spurs 121, Bucks 114

LaMarcus Aldridge poured in 29 points and grabbed 15 rebounds, and DeMar DeRozan added 28 points as host San Antonio turned back Milwaukee for its fifth straight win.

The Spurs trailed the entire first half but took the lead in the third quarter and led by four points heading to the fourth. Marco Belinelli and Patty Mills hit for 16 points each for the Spurs, while Bryn Forbes added 12.

Giannis Antetokounmpo led the Bucks with 27 points and 13 rebounds. Eric Bledsoe scored 21 points, Khris Middleton tallied 15, Pat Connaughton hit for 14 points, Brook Lopez added 11 points and 10 rebounds, and Nikola Mirotic contributed 10 points.

Rockets 94, Mavericks 93

Eric Gordon scored a game-high 26 points as Houston extended its winning streak to a season-best eight games by edging host Dallas.

James Harden, who picked up his fifth foul in the opening seconds of the third quarter, missed 18 of his 25 shots and took just three free throws in finishing with 20 points. Center Clint Capela added 17 points and 12 rebounds.

Luka Doncic, who was hobbling late in the game, led the Mavericks with 19 points, 15 rebounds and nine assists. He didn’t have a good shooting game, going 5 of 16 overall and 1 of 6 from beyond the arc. Rookie Jalen Brunson scored 18 points with seven rebounds.

Magic 105, Grizzlies 97

Mike Conley brought host Memphis from behind to steal a win from Orlando, giving the Grizzlies their fourth win in their last five games.

Memphis trailed 95-88 with 3:06 remaining but closed out the game on a 17-2 run. Conley had 26 points, eight assists and five rebounds, and Avery Bradley added 21 points for the Grizzlies.

Nikola Vucevic led Orlando with 26 points and 10 rebounds, and Terrence Ross added 15 points off the bench. The Magic have lost three of their last four games, though they sit just one game out of the eighth and final seed in the Eastern Conference playoff race.

Hawks 128, Pelicans 116

John Collins had his second straight double-double and Kevin Huerter scored 27 points to help host Atlanta break its three-game losing streak by knocking off New Orleans.

Collins followed Saturday’s performance of 33 points and 20 rebounds against Brooklyn by getting 23 points and 10 rebounds for his 27th double-double. He also had four blocks, two of them in the final quarter when the Pelicans were trying to mount a comeback.

New Orleans center Anthony Davis returned after a missing a game with back spasms and finished with 15 points and eight rebounds. Davis played only 21 minutes. The Pelicans were led by Frank Jackson and Julius Randle, who each scored 23 points.

Timberwolves 103, Knicks 92

Taj Gibson scored a season-high 25 points and filled in nicely for injured center Karl-Anthony Towns, as Minnesota ran its home winning streak to six games at the expense of New York in Minneapolis.

Towns (right knee inflammation) missed the third game of his career after injuring his knee with eight seconds left in Saturday’s overtime win over Washington. The injury appeared significantly worse when Towns limped off the floor but and was held out of Sunday’s game as a precaution after participating in pregame warmups.

Jeff Teague collected 20 points and 10 rebounds for his 11th double-double as the Wolves shot 44.7 percent while playing without Andrew Wiggins (right quad) for the second straight game. Damyean Dotson scored 26 points for the Knicks, whose losing streak reached six games.

Raptors 125, Heat 104

Kyle Lowry scored 24 points, making six 3-pointers, and added 10 assists and seven rebounds as Toronto defeated host Miami.

Kawhi Leonard did not play Sunday because of “load management” for the Raptors, who ended the Heat’s four-game winning streak. Pascal Siakam added 20 points for the Raptors, who have won all three meetings with the Heat this season.

Bam Adebayo scored 19 points with six rebounds and five assists for the Heat, Dwyane Wade and Dion Waiters each added 15 points, Rodney McGruder had 13 points, Goran Dragic had 11 and Justise Winslow scored 10.

Pistons 131, Bulls 108

Blake Griffin racked up 28 points, six rebounds and five assists and streaking Detroit defeated Chicago for the second time in three days and completed a four-game sweep for the season.

Reggie Jackson and Langston Galloway had 21 points apiece and Andre Drummond supplied 16 points and 15 rebounds for his 18th double-double for the host Pistons, who won their fifth straight and 12th in their last 14.

Wayne Selden scored 18 points off the bench to lead the Bulls. Otto Porter Jr. and Lauri Markkanen added 17 points apiece, while Shaquille Harrison tossed in 11.

–Field Level Media

Source: OANN

Tennis: BNP Paribas Open-Day 5
Mar 8, 2019; Indian Wells, CA, USA; Serena Williams (USA) as she defeated Victoria Azarenka (not pictured) during her second round match in the BNP Paribas Open at the Indian Wells Tennis Garden. Mandatory Credit: Jayne Kamin-Oncea-USA TODAY Sports

March 10, 2019

(Reuters) – Serena Williams retired from the BNP Paribas Open while trailing Spain’s Garbine Muguruza 6-3 1-0 at Indian Wells on Sunday.

Williams walked to the chair after the first game of the second set and sat down, breathing heavily. She and supervisor Donna Kelso had a discussion and Williams retired.

(Reporting by Gene Cherry in Raleigh, North Carolina; Editing by Ken Ferris)

Source: OANN

The struggle to get noticed in a bulging field of Democratic presidential contenders doesn’t get easier when you have to compete with the likes of party stars Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and Beto O’Rourke.

Eight 2020 Democratic hopefuls took the stage at the annual South by Southwest cultural festival in Austin, Texas, over the weekend, attempting to broaden their appeal and test their message with a millennial-heavy audience.

But as the candidates took turns giving lengthy, often policy-weighted interviews, they were eclipsed by two Democrats who aren’t even in the race. New York Representative Ocasio-Cortez and O’Rourke, a former Texas representative, each commanded huge crowds and dominated the conference buzz.

O’Rourke made a widely expected “surprise” appearance at the premier of a documentary about his close but ultimately failed 2018 Senate race against Republican Ted Cruz. He disappointed fans that hoped he’d use the occasion to announce he’s also entering the presidential contest. Ocasio-Cortez, 29, weeks into her first term and not old enough to run for the White House, packed a huge ballroom at the Austin Convention Center to answer questions about her vision for a Green New Deal and identity politics.

Warren’s Plan

Their appearances overshadowed sessions with two sitting U.S. senators who are candidates for the Democratic nomination, Amy Klobuchar of Minnesota and Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, although both drew full houses of attentive listeners. Warren inspired an animated response to her proposal, announced on Friday, to break up giant tech companies like Facebook Inc. and Alphabet Co.’s Google in a bid to ensure a competitive market.

But Ocasio-Cortez’s call to smash political norms was the session that attracted the most diverse and enthusiastic crowd. As she entered, about one-third of the audience leaped up, cheered and raised their phones to capture photos and videos. A queue of people waiting to ask questions of the youngest woman in Congress included television personality Bill Nye, the Science Guy. Unlike the punctual start and finish times of the candidate interviews, Ocasio-Cortez extended her session by almost 30 minutes in order to field more questions.

She used the occasion to underscore her reputation for controversial remarks with a critique of capitalism as an unsustainable system that emphasizes corporate profit over the welfare of working people.

Income Inequality

In contrast to the congresswoman’s overflow crowd, only a few dozen people drifted into a theater event space Sunday morning to hear Washington Governor Jay Inslee explain why he’s making climate change the centerpiece of his campaign for the Democratic nomination.

Like the other candidates at SXSW, Inslee hit hard on criticism of President Donald Trump. A common theme for the candidates as well as for Ocasio-Cortez was the need to address income inequality and address the concerns of working class voters in the middle of the U.S. who gravitated to Trump in 2016.

“There was some folderol going on that we could not connect with people feeling economic anxiety in the Midwestern states,” Inslee said. The 2018 midterms, in which Democrats won back the majority in the U.S. House and won many down-ballot gains, “proved we could. We proved we could connect with meat and potato concerns.”

Republican Critics

Former Colorado Governor John Hickenlooper, former Obama administration official Julian Castro, and South Bend, Indiana, Mayor Pete Buttigieg, all in the mix for the Democratic nomination, also took the stage.

Republicans on hand included former Massachusetts Governor William Weld, who’s considering challenging Trump in the Republican primaries, and former Ohio Governor John Kasich, a Trump critic.

There are still 11 months to go before Democratic voters make their preferences known in the first actual nomination contest — the Iowa caucuses. But the candidates in the race are already vying for donations and endorsements while building the kind of campaign infrastructure necessary for a months-long 50-state primary race. Getting in front of voters is crucial for that.

Generational Issues

The South by Southwest conference, started in 1987, has evolved into one of the country’s defining cultural events, combining music and film festivals with showcases for technology and politics. This year it made an ideal venue for presidential aspirants to test their message and broaden their appeal to a generation shaped by school shootings, climate change and the Internet, while facing soaring costs for college and health care.

The Democratic field is still dominated by a candidate not yet in the race: former Vice President Joe Biden. He remains the favorite in national and state polling as the first choice of about a quarter of Democrats. He’s followed by Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders, with Warren and California Senator Kamala Harris trailing.

O’Rourke, who like Biden has said he’d make a decision on the race soon, remains consistently in the middle of the pack, ahead of Klobuchar, New Jersey Senator Cory Booker and the rest. Inslee, Hickenlooper, Castro and Buttigieg are barely registering in polls at this early stage.

Source: NewsMax

Luke Rosiak | Investigative Reporter

The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) hired an Iowa doctor, accused of incompetence by the state licensing board, who immediately allegedly botched a surgery that led to a $950,000 settlement with the patient.

On October 16, 2015, Iowa regulators filed disciplinary charges against Dr. Alan R. Kaslow for “incompetence” and “disruptive behavior.” He received a fine and five years’ probation.

The next month, he was working for the VA in South Carolina, a move so surprising given his record that the Des Moines Register wrote about it at the time.

What the paper didn’t know back then was that within his first month on the job, a patient accused Kaslow of bungling a surgery. Kevin Langager said he was “basically gutted like a fish” by Kaslow, according to a new Register report revealing the financial settlement in which the federal government paid Langager to resolve the case.

Langager filed a lawsuit saying he “was left to be a guinea pig at the behest of the VA, which is supposed to advocate for the veterans of this country.”

Kaslow denied bungling Langager’s surgery, but said that VA settled to protect the federal agency’s own image by avoiding calling attention to its choice to hire someone with a troubled record.

“They basically settled because of their exposure because of what the Iowa board wrote — not because of anything I did,” Kaslow told the Register. He said the VA did not even interview him to get his side of the story about what happened with the South Carolina surgery before agreeing to shell out nearly $1 million in taxpayer money. (RELATED: The VA Has Paid Nearly $1 Billion In Malpractice Settlements Over The Last Decade)

Nearly an identical situation occurred a few years prior. In 2011 another Des Moines surgeon, Robert Finley III, paid a fine to settle charges in Iowa related to mistakes that allegedly caused the deaths of six patients.

Then he was hired by a VA hospital in West Virginia, and in 2014, the family of a veteran sued the government alleging that Finley caused that patient’s death in 2013.

The VA has a long history of hiring those who no one else will and putting them in positions of trust. (VA Manager Says ‘Thank God’ They Don’t Have To Hire Veterans)

An Illinois VA hospital hired Dr. John K. Sturman Jr. as its chief of opiate safety shortly after his privileges were suspended in Indiana when 35 patients died of drug issues in his care. The VA hired him in 2015 despite having lost his privileges in Indiana in 2012 and also been reprimanded in California. The VA has had major problems with the reckless administration of opiates in order to sedate patients.

Sturman was later hauled out of the hospital in handcuffs after Indiana prosecutors decided to take the case criminal. They said fifteen patients died of overdose or toxicity within a month of receiving treatment from him between 2009 and 2012, alleging he “recklessly killed another human … by writing and/or issuing prescriptions.” They said he had a pattern of giving obvious drug addicts frequently-abused drugs without medical cause, and billing the charges to Medicaid, the government healthcare program for the poor.

The VA also hired a human resources official fresh out of prison for breaking into the home of a judge, attacking his daughter in the shower and cutting her car’s brakes. At another hospital, a convicted child molester works in HR, saying “There’s no children in [the hospital], so they figure I could not harm anyone here.”

At the highest levels of hospital leadership, the VA has a pattern of recycling failed managers through multiple states after performance scandals. Residents of the first state assume they have been removed as problem employees, but rather than go through the unwieldy federal employment termination process, the agency simply gives them top jobs at different hospitals.

The below graphic shows the recycling of VA managers around the country.

Follow Luke on Twitter. Send tips to [email protected].

Content created by The Daily Caller News Foundation is available without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a large audience. For licensing opportunities of our original content, please contact [email protected].

Source: The Daily Caller

Workers produce some of the specialized valves at Emerson Electric Co.’s factory in Marshalltown Iowa
Workers produce some of the specialized valves at Emerson Electric Co.’s factory in Marshalltown, Iowa, U.S., July 26, 2018. Picture taken on July 26, 2018. REUTERS/Timothy Aeppel

March 8, 2019

By Timothy Aeppel

Ferguson, Mo. (Reuters) – In 2009, the chief executive of Emerson Electric Co. bluntly told investors at a Chicago conference what many of his counterparts at other manufacturing firms would only say privately.

“I’m not going to hire anybody in the United States. I’m moving,” David Farr said as he blasted U.S. taxes and regulations and called it an easy decision to expand in India and China.

Farr’s flash of candor was emblematic of an era of free trade, globalization and offshoring of U.S. jobs – one that has now come under attack in the trade wars launched by U.S. President Donald Trump.

A decade later, Farr has made a stunning reversal: Emerson now plans to build at least three new U.S. plants and is already expanding existing domestic operations. Farr saw a new era of U.S. protectionism coming before Trump’s election – and started planning accordingly, he said in an interview with Reuters at the company’s sprawling headquarters near St. Louis, Missouri.

“For the first time now, I’m looking for best-cost U.S. locations” to build factories, he said.

Trump’s election, Farr said, accelerated a political shift against free trade policy that is now transforming many U.S. firms’ domestic investment strategy. Protectionist policies — especially toward China — are now a rare point on which many Democrats and Trump agree, relegating formerly bold Republican free traders to the sidelines.

Emerson has committed $250 million for new U.S. facilities through 2021, part of a larger domestic investment in existing operations, including a new headquarters and a factory renovation at its Wisconsin garbage-disposal business. Emerson spent $407 million on U.S. capital projects last year, a 38 percent jump from the year before, and plans to spend $425 million this year.

Those investments have added 2,500 employees, Farr said. Emerson declined to say how many jobs the new factories would create.

Emerson, a diversified manufacturer with $17.4 billion in sales last year, provides dozens of industries with thousands of products, from tools and large industrial valves to refrigeration, lighting and climate control systems. Its best-known consumer brand may be the InSinkErator garbage disposal.

Farr’s new take on U.S. investment reflects a broader questioning of overseas expansions, especially in China, for both political and operational reasons. A survey of top managers at 500 U.S. companies conducted in December by investment bank UBS AG found that 31 percent have moved or are moving production facilities to avoid tariffs. Fifty-eight percent said they expect tariffs to “have a positive impact on domestic investment.”

It remains unclear, however, whether and how much the trade policy upheaval will benefit U.S. workers. Many firms fleeing China to avoid U.S. tariffs are not moving to the United States, often choosing locations in Southeast Asia. Those that are expanding U.S. operations are trying to maximize automation to minimize labor costs, and some U.S. industries – such as consumers of steel – have said they plan to cut jobs because tariffs have raised their costs.

The renewed domestic focus by Emerson, a major employer of high-skilled workers, nonetheless stands out as a victory for Trump’s protectionism. Emerson has been a poster child for globalization, and its CEO is among the nation’s most influential manufacturing executives. Farr just completed a two-year term as chairman of the National Association of Manufacturers, the sector’s main lobbying organization.

Emerson once had an overwhelming U.S. and European focus. But that changed as it joined the stampede of manufacturers moving to emerging markets. When Farr became CEO in 2000, 8 percent of Emerson’s sales were in Asia. Last year, that hit 22 percent, and Emerson now has 26,000 employees in the region, slightly more than in the U.S. and Canada. Most of the company’s 215 factories sprinkled around the globe are now outside the U.S.

But one of Farr’s first moves after Trump’s election was to assign a task force of top managers to adapt the firm’s investment plans to a less certain trade environment. The group has produced a top-ten list of potential U.S. locations for new plants.

TURNING AGAINST TRADE

Free trade deals once had almost universal support among Republicans and broad support among Democrats. Farr noted that it was Democratic President Barack Obama who negotiated the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP), which Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton once called the “gold standard” of trade agreements. But Clinton turned against the deal during the campaign as Trump’s attacks on trade deals drew applause across the industrial Midwest.

Trump withdrew the United States from the sweeping Pacific accord immediately after his election, and many Republican free-traders have since gone silent on the issue or adopted variations of the president’s rhetoric.

“You have a growing number in the Republican party aligned with what the President calls ‘America first’ – what others call isolationism,” said Andrew Downs, director of the Mike Downs Center for Indiana Politics at Purdue University Fort Wayne.

The tax reform passed by Republicans has also made the U.S. a better place to invest by slashing taxes on businesses, Farr said, saving Emerson $189 million last year. The tax cuts enabled Emerson to grant a 2.9 percent general wage increase worth $42 million and better benefits.

Some decisions remain in flux as trade disputes simmer. Emerson had long planned a new factory in Mexico to serve North America, but broke construction into two phases pending the outcome of a revised U.S. trade agreement with Canada and Mexico that awaits congressional approval. The first phase is underway, but the second will only be built if the trade deal goes forward.

Forces beyond politics are pushing manufacturers like Emerson to reconsider investments in China, including rising labor and logistics costs there; worries about transferring intellectual property to state-run Chinese firms; and emerging technology to automate factories in high-wage countries.

Farr said his meetings with candidate Trump during the campaign convinced him he was serious about overhauling U.S. trade relationships. But Emerson’s renewed commitment to U.S. manufacturing is also part of a larger move by global manufacturers to produce more goods in the regions where they are consumed to save on transportation costs.

Foreign companies are also recalibrating, including Dutch multinational Koninklijke Philips NV, one of the world’s largest electronics companies, which last year relied on the United States for 35 percent of its sales. CEO Frans van Houten told investors on a call in January that he is stepping up efforts — like Emerson — to produce more goods where they sell them, moving away from a model of factories specializing in products that are then shipped globally.

The push is visible in trade data, said Susan Lund, a partner at McKinsey & Company who studies trade flows. In 2007, 28 percent of global production of goods was traded — moving from one country to another. That share has dropped to 22.5 percent.

Emerson’s industrial valve and controls business is one area where Farr plans to move factory capacity to the United States to serve customers there. Emerson produces valves used in everything from fracking to oil refineries and has sprawling research and production facilities in Marshalltown, Iowa, which this fiscal year will receive a $22 million capital investment and three dozen new jobs.

U.S. valve factories produced only about half the goods it sold domestically in 2017. Emerson plans to push that to 90 percent by 2021.

“We’re looking at two new facilities in Texas,” Farr said. “That will mean taking capacity, and jobs – out of Europe and some out of China – and bringing it to Texas.”

(Reporting by Timothy Aeppel; Editing by Joseph White and Brian Thevenot)

Source: OANN

U.S. Representative Ilhan Omar participates in a news conference to call on Congress to cut funding for ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement), at the U.S. Capitol in Washington
U.S. Representative Ilhan Omar (D-MN) participates in a news conference to call on Congress to cut funding for ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement), at the U.S. Capitol in Washington, U.S. February 7, 2019. REUTERS/Jonathan Ernst

March 8, 2019

By Amanda Becker

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The U.S. House of Representatives approved a broad resolution condemning bigotry on Thursday after remarks by a Democratic member that some viewed as anti-Semitic exposed an ideological and generational rift in the party.

Some Democrats, including several U.S. senators who are seeking the party’s 2020 presidential nomination, warned that party leaders were playing into Republicans’ hands and had stymied legitimate debate over U.S.-Israel policy.

The House, which is controlled by Democrats, approved the resolution condemning anti-Semitism, anti-Muslim discrimination and other forms of bigotry by a 407-to-23 vote.

The vote came less than a week after Representative Ilhan Omar, one of the two first Muslim women elected to Congress, made statements at a Washington event that were denounced by some as anti-Semitic.

The resolution does not mention Omar by name. But Republicans have seized on Omar’s statements and the resulting intra-party conflict as a sign the Democratic Party is fractured.

Many Democrats, in turn, have said House leaders were cowed by a Republican effort to divert attention from bigotry within their own ranks and that Omar is being held to a different standard.

“Unfortunately, I think the Democratic leadership here has made what I think is a pretty serious mistake in caving to this pressure,” said Democratic strategist Peter Daou, who has advised Hillary Clinton and John Kerry.

The disagreement began after Omar, in an appearance at a Washington book store, said she feared that statements she and fellow Representative Rashida Tlaib made about foreign policy and the pro-Israel lobbying group the American Israel Public Affairs Committee (AIPAC) would be viewed as anti-Semitic because they are Muslim.

“I want to talk about the political influence in this country that says it’s OK for people to push for allegiance to a foreign country. I want to ask why is it OK for me to talk about the influence of the NRA (National Rifle Association), of fossil fuel industries or Big Pharma, and not talk about a powerful lobbying group that is influencing policies?” Omar said.

Omar’s critics denounced the statement as playing into the anti-Semitic trope that Jewish Americans are loyal to Israel over the United States. Omar said opposing the policies of Israel and Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is not synonymous with anti-Semitism.

Omar, in a joint statement issued after Thursday’s vote with Tlaib and Representative Andre Carson, a Democrat from Indiana, said “we are tremendously proud to be part of a body that has put forth a condemnation of all forms of bigotry.”

Omar had previously apologized for February tweets that her critics said suggested Jewish Americans used money to influence pro-Israel U.S. policies.

Representative Liz Cheney, the No. 3 House Republican, told reporters on Wednesday that Omar “embodies a vile, hate-filled, anti-Semitic, anti-Israel bigotry.”

President Donald Trump on Twitter on Wednesday called the Democratic response “shameful.”

Cheney, complaining that the House should have “rebuked” Omar by name and removed her from the Foreign Affairs Committee, voted against the resolution.

Other Republicans who voted no, such as Chris Collins of New York, said the bill was not “strong enough in support of Israel, the only true democracy in the Middle East.”

Republican Representative Steve King, who was condemned by the House in January for questioning why white supremacy is considered offensive, voted present.

Democrats had been divided over how best to handle Omar’s comments.

Democratic Representative Eliot Engel, who chairs the Foreign Affairs Committee, said he welcomes policy debate but that it was “deeply offensive to call into question the loyalty of fellow American citizens because of their political views, including the U.S.-Israel relationship.”

Young, progressive House newcomers like Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez and several Democratic presidential candidates, however, came to Omar’s defense.

Senator Bernie Sanders said in a statement that “we must not … equate anti-Semitism with legitimate criticism of the right-wing, Netanyahu government.” Senator Elizabeth Warren said “branding criticism of Israel as automatically anti-Semitic has a chilling effect on our public discourse.” Senator Kamala Harris said she was concerned about Omar’s safety.

Daou, the Democratic strategist, said a political double standard was at play, pointing to a recent tweet from Republican Representative Jim Jordan that used a dollar sign for a letter in the name of Democratic donor Tom Steyer, who is Jewish.

“Why is it that a white, male Republican can largely get away with the same thing and this massive outcry happened over a Muslim, progressive woman of color? That’s something we have to grapple with,” Daou said.

(Reporting by Amanda Becker; Additional reporting by Richard Cowan; Editing by Tom Brown, Leslie Adler and Lisa Shumaker)

Source: OANN

Evie Fordham | Politics and Health Care Reporter

  • Freshman Sens. Rick Scott of Florida and Mike Braun of Indiana are the cosponsors of the Banning Lobbying and Safeguarding Trust (BLAST) Act.
  • Scott and Braun want to put an end to lawmakers stepping into the so-called “revolving door of K Street” — using their connections to become well-heeled lobbyists once they are out of office.
  • Already, at least 15 members of the past Congress have made the move to lobbying firms.

Two Republican senators introduced legislation to ban members of Congress from lobbying Congress once they exit office, and although the lawmakers are “barking up the right tree,” their solution might not be realistic, a government transparency expert told The Daily Caller News Foundation.

Sens. Rick Scott of Florida and Mike Braun of Indiana are the cosponsors of the Banning Lobbying and Safeguarding Trust (BLAST) Act.

“You generally do see more of a reform agenda from some of the newer members that come into the Senate or into the House. We’re hoping some of their policies actually gain traction and can be supported in a bipartisan way,” Scott Amey, general counsel at the Project on Government Oversight, told TheDCNF in a phone interview. “The public is tired of politics as usual.”

Scott and Braun want to put an end to lawmakers stepping into the so-called “revolving door of K Street” — using their connections to become well-heeled lobbyists once they are out of office. Current law mandates ex-House members must wait a year to lobby their former colleagues, while ex-senators must wait two. (RELATED: Trump Weighs In After DNC Says Fox News Can’t Host Primary Debate)

“I’m proud to introduce this bill that imposes a permanent ban on members of Congress becoming lobbyists. Rather than serving the public, too many in Washington spend their political careers preparing for a lucrative job at a DC lobbying firm where they can cash in on their connections and their access,” Scott said in a statement March 1.

“One of the reasons I left the private sector for Washington was to help President Trump drain the swamp and we can accomplish this by permanently banning Congressmen and Senators from lobbying Capitol Hill. Together we can end the revolving door of career politicians coming to Washington, spending time in Congress, then enriching themselves from their service to the American people,” Braun said in a statement March 1.

Already, at least 15 members of the last Congress have made the move to lobbying firms, according to MarketWatch. They include former Democratic New York Rep. Joe Crowley, who hopped over to major lobbying firm Squire Patton Boggs, former Republican Indiana Rep. Luke Messer, who is now at Faegre Baker Daniels Consulting, and former Republican Arizona Sen. Jon Kyl.

The Revolving Door

Kyl is the “Featured Revolver” on the Center for Responsive Politics’ website after he returned to work for lobbying law firm Covington & Burling following a four-month appointment to the Senate that ended in January.

(L-R) Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Judge Brett Kavanaugh, Vice President Mike Pence and former Sen. Jon Kyl greet one another before a meeting in McConnell's office in the U.S. Capitol July 10, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

(L-R) Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, Judge Brett Kavanaugh, Vice President Mike Pence and former Sen. Jon Kyl greet one another before a meeting in McConnell’s office in the U.S. Capitol July 10, 2018 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

Kyl’s appointment sparked concern since he would be able to vote for then-Supreme Court nominee Brett Kavanaugh — after acting in his capacity as a lobbyist as Kavanaugh’s “lead sherpa” for the beginning of his Senate confirmation process. Kyl voted yes on Kavanaugh’s confirmation.

“The reason why we have revolvers in the first place is they’re deemed to be rather valuable. If you have gone from working on the Hill with members of Congress, as a chief of staff or legislative assistant, somewhere in that realm, to now working on K Street lobbying for the pharmaceutical industry or a gay rights organization, you are established enough to know all of these people you’ll be taking meetings with,” Center for Responsive Politics spokesman Brendan Quinn told TheDCNF in a phone interview.

These crossovers can be lucrative.

“Salaries are considered definitely higher” than congressional salaries, Quinn told TheDCNF, even though senior members of Congress can rake in roughly $200,000 a year.

Possible Side Effects?

Scott and Braun’s bill could have unintended consequences, Bruce Mehlman of lobbying firm Mehlman Castagnetti Rosen & Thomas told TheDCNF.

“The bigger challenge is that registered lobbying represents only a small part of the total spent on influencing government policy, and this proposed law would merely encourage even more ex-Members to avoid disclosure while serving as ‘senior advisors,’ ‘strategists’ or ‘consultants at law and PR firms,’” Mehlman told TheDCNF in an email.

Quinn pointed out that Scott and Braun are already wealthy. Braun’s exact net worth is unknown (it’s reportedly somewhere between $35 million to $96 million), while Scott is worth more than $230 million, according to the Orlando Sentinel in 2018.

US senators Marco Rubio (L) and Rick Scott speak to reporters after a meeting with US President Donald Trump on Venezuela, outside of the West Wing of the White House in Washington, DC on January 22, 2019. (MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

US senators Marco Rubio (L) and Rick Scott speak to reporters after a meeting with US President Donald Trump on Venezuela, outside of the West Wing of the White House in Washington, DC on January 22, 2019. (MANDEL NGAN/AFP/Getty Images)

“They don’t need to think about where their next paycheck is coming from,” he told TheDCNF.

Scott’s office is adamant that “Congress shouldn’t be a place where people come to permanently live off the taxpayers,” Scott spokesman Chris Hartline told TheDCNF in an email.

“They shouldn’t spend their political careers trying to find a way to capitalize on their connections and their access. There’s plenty of jobs besides lobbying that former members can do. In fact, there’s 250,000 job openings in Florida. Former members should apply for one of those jobs. The weather’s nicer,” Hartline continued.

The split Congress has a chance to restore public faith in government with bills like this one, Amey told TheDCNF.

“One of the things you hear a lot when talking to people who are frustrated with the way government works, they think government makes a lot of its decisions based who you know, the lobbyists that visit these offices,” Amey said. “Those lobbyists don’t often speak for the general public.”

TheDCNF reached out to Kyl but did not receive a response at the time of publication.

Follow Evie on Twitter @eviefordham.

Send tips to [email protected].

Content created by The Daily Caller News Foundation is available without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a large audience. For licensing opportunities of our original content, please contact [email protected].

Source: The Daily Caller

David Hookstead | Reporter

The Wisconsin Badgers fell to Indiana 75-73 Tuesday night in a Big 10 thriller that went to three overtimes.

As you all know, I told people I was insanely nervous for the game in Assembly Hall. Indiana might be having a down year, but they have the talent to hang with anybody. I knew we could run into some serious issues on the road in Bloomington. Well, it turns out I was correct.

However, we have nobody but ourselves to blame for the loss. Our free throw shooting down the stretch was simply atrocious. We shot 13-25 from the line, and that’s simply not acceptable if you want to win as a powerhouse program. One free throw is the difference between a win and a loss last night. Just one, and we couldn’t get it. (RELATED: Wisconsin Beats Nebraska 62-51, Khalil Iverson Throws Down Another Monster Dunk)

It also didn’t help that Brad Davison played one of the worst games that I’ve ever seen from him since arriving in town. It was atrocious. All players are bound to have a bad game from time to time, but it’s never a good sign when it’s one of the star players.

The question now is where we go from here. We’re sitting at 19-9 with games against Penn State, Iowa and Ohio State left. In a perfect world, we’d win all three of them.

At the very least, we can only lose one. There’s no excuse for losing anymore than that, and I’m being generous by even suggesting one loss would be something we could swallow.

Last night broke our spirit, and now it’s time to get it back together. We fought for three overtimes. While that’s admirable, it should never have even come to that.

It’s time to dissect what happened this morning, and then immediately get to work on our final three regular season games.

We’re the Wisconsin Badgers. We won’t let one loss keep us down for long. We’ll learn from it and rebuild. I’ll see you in March, and we’ll be dangerous. Count on that, my friends.

P.S.: We have got to stop starting games so late. It was midnight by the time I got to bed last night. Props to me for not missing a second of the game, but these late starts are getting absurd.

Follow David Hookstead on Twitter

Source: The Daily Caller

NCAA Basketball: Duke at Virginia Tech
Feb 26, 2019; Blacksburg, VA, USA; Duke Blue Devils forward R.J. Barrett (5) shoots against Virginia Tech Hokies guard Nickeil Alexander-Walker (4) and forward Kerry Blackshear Jr. (24) in the second half at Cassell Coliseum. Mandatory Credit: Michael Shroyer-USA TODAY Sports

February 27, 2019

Ty Outlaw made a late 3-pointer to break a tie as No. 20 Virginia Tech upset No. 3 Duke 77-72 on Tuesday night in Blacksburg, Va.

Kerry Blackshear Jr. scored 23 points, Ahmed Hill posted 17 points and Nickeil Alexander-Walker added 13 points for Virginia Tech (22-6, 11-5 Atlantic Coast Conference). The Hokies won for the fourth time in five games.

Duke (24-4, 12-3) played its second full game without freshman Zion Williamson, who sustained a knee sprain in the opening minute of a home loss to North Carolina on Feb. 20. The Blue Devils didn’t have enough answers the way they did Saturday night in a victory at Syracuse, and they into slipped into third place in the ACC.

RJ Barrett scored 21 points, Cam Reddish added 17 points, and Marques Bolden had 14 points for the Blue Devils, who lost at Blacksburg for the third year in a row.

No. 4 Kentucky 70, Arkansas 66

Tyler Herro scored a season-best 29 points on 9-of-10 shooting to help the Wildcats rally for a victory over the Razorbacks at Lexington, Ky.

Keldon Johnson added 13 points for Kentucky (24-4, 13-2 Southeastern Conference), who won their fourth straight game and 14th in their past 15. Nick Richards collected 15 rebounds as the Wildcats recovered from a 15-point, second-half deficit.

Isaiah Joe scored 16 of his 19 points in the first half for Arkansas (14-14, 5-10), which dropped its sixth straight game. Desi Sills tallied 15 points, and Daniel Gafford added 14 points and eight rebounds. The Razorbacks have lost seven straight games to the Wildcats.

No. 5 North Carolina 93, Syracuse 85

Coby White scored a season-high 34 points, and the Tar Heels used a huge edge in free throws to defeat the Orange in Chapel Hill, N.C.

North Carolina (23-5, 13-2 Atlantic Coast Conference) has won four games in a row and moved a half-game ahead of Virginia for the top spot in the ACC, aided by Duke’s loss earlier in the night at Virginia Tech.

Cameron Johnson posted 16 points for the Tar Heels, who were 34-for-37 on free throws. Tyus Battle scored 29 points, Elijah Hughes poured in 15 points, Frank Howard had 11 points and Oshae Brissett added 10 points for Syracuse (18-10, 9-6). The Orange hit 13 of 23 from the line.

No. 13 LSU 66, Texas A&M 55

Naz Reid, bouncing back from his worst offensive output of the season, scored 18 points and grabbed 11 rebounds to lift the Tigers past the Aggies in Baton Rouge, La.

Reid had only one point in LSU’s 82-80 overtime victory over No. 5 Tennessee on Saturday, but he got started early Tuesday by scoring eight of LSU’s first 14 points and accounting for 10 points and eight rebounds in the first half. Ja’vonte Smart added 17 points for the Tigers (23-5, 13-2 SEC).

LSU played suffocating defense, holding Texas A&M (12-16, 5-10) to eight points in the first 10:25 of the game. The Aggies finished 19 of 60 from the floor (31.7 percent) and 4 of 22 (18.2 percent) from long range.

Indiana 75, No. 19 Wisconsin 73 (2 OTs)

Romeo Langford’s last-second layup gave the Hoosiers a double-overtime victory over the Badgers in Bloomington, Ind., as Indiana snapped a five-game losing streak.

Langford scored 13 of his team-high 22 points in the overtime periods to seal the deal for the Hoosiers (14-14, 5-12 Big Ten). Wisconsin (19-9, 11-6) missed six three throws in the second overtime.

Wisconsin’s Ethan Happ led all scorers with 23 points and collected 11 rebounds. Khalil Iverson scored 15 and D’Mitrik Trice added 12 for the Badgers, who saw their two-game winning streak end.

No. 21 Buffalo 77, Akron 64

Nick Perkins scored 25 points, and the Bulls extended their winning streak to six games by grinding out a win over the visiting Zips. Buffalo (25-3, 13-2 Mid-American Conference) has won 25 straight at home.

CJ Massinburg collected 23 points, 10 rebounds and six assists for Buffalo while Jayvon Graves added 14 points, seven rebounds, five assists and three blocks.

Akron (15-13, 7-8) was led by Tyler Cheese, who had 20 points, five rebounds and six assists.

Ohio State 90, No. 22 Iowa 70

Freshman Justin Ahrens, making just his second start, more than tripled his career high with 29 points to lead the Buckeyes to an upset of the Hawkeyes in Columbus, Ohio.

Ahrens’ previous high was nine points vs. Maryland. Kaleb Wesson added 18 points and 11 rebounds for the Buckeyes (18-10, 8-9 Big Ten).

Joe Wieskamp had 17 points to lead Iowa (21-7, 10-7). Hawkeyes coach Fran McCaffery and his son, guard Connor McCaffery, received second-half technical fouls, and multiple media outlets reported that Fran McCaffery cursed out a referee after the game.

–Field Level Media

Source: OANN

Graeme Gallagher | Contributor

While searching through a man’s home in Indiana, the FBI discovered thousands of dug up human bones, according to a CBS News report published Tuesday.

“About 2,000 bones,” said Tim Carpenter, who heads the FBI’s art crime unit. “To the best of our knowledge right now, those 2,000 bones represent about 500 human beings.”

Believing that the remains were dug up from Native American burial sites, the FBI’s primary goal is to return the bones to where they came from. (RELATED: Amateur Archaeologists Find Hundreds Of Viking Artifacts In Baltics)

“All too often here we have been treated as curiosities rather than a people here,” said tribal official Pete Coffey, who the FBI brought on for the case. “They could very well be my own great, great, great, great grandfather, or grandmother … I characterize it as being ripped out of the earth, you know.”

“You have to treat these people with dignity,” said Carpenter. “These are human beings and people. It matters. It has meaning to people today, it has meaning to our children and their children.”

The FBI has already returned some of the remains to Native American tribes in South Dakota and is launching a “large-scale repatriation” of the bones for the coming months. (RELATED: Sen. Elizabeth Warren Floats Reparations For Native Americans)

Don Miller, the owner of the house who died in 2015, gathered some 42,000 items that include “pre-Colombian pottery, an Italian mosaic, and items from China,” which Miller himself dated back to 500 B.C.

However, many of the artifacts were illegally obtained by Miller who went on digs around the world for decades “in violation of antiquities laws.”

Repatriated Iraqi artifacts are shown in this photo in Washington, D.C., U.S., released May 2, 2018. U.S. Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of New York/Handout via REUTERS

Repatriated Iraqi artifacts are shown in this photo in Washington, D.C., U.S., released May 2, 2018. U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of New York/Handout via REUTERS

“When I first went into his house and saw the size of the collection, it was unlike anything we’d ever seen,” said Carpenter. “Not only me, but I don’t think anybody on the art crime team.”

“Roughly half of the collection was Native American, and the other half of the collection was from every corner of the globe,” said Carpenter, according to CBS News.

The FBI has been searching the house since 2014 after Miller agreed to have 5,000 artifacts returned to their countries of origin. (RELATED: Hobby Lobby Has $3 Million Worth Of Illicit Iraqi Artifacts)

“I think he felt compelled to try and do the right thing and return these home,” Carpenter said.

The FBI has already returned some of Miller’s artifacts to multiple countries, such as Cambodia, Canada, Colombia and Mexico.

Source: The Daily Caller

FILE PHOTO: British explorer Ranulph Fiennes listens during a news conference after his arrival at Heathrow Airport in London
FILE PHOTO: British explorer Ranulph Fiennes listens during a news conference in a hotel, after his arrival at Heathrow Airport in London March 4, 2013. The 68-year-old was forced to pull out of an expedition across Antarctica during winter due to frostbite. REUTERS/Chris Helgren/File Photo

February 26, 2019

By Lisa Keddie

LONDON (Reuters) – Squeezing through tiny tunnels into a mummy’s tomb is not something to rattle veteran British explorer Ranulph Fiennes.

Yet for his younger cousin, who brought him to Egypt to film a TV show, the experience was stirring.

“I constantly felt I was in an Indiana Jones set. I keep (saying): ‘Oh no, not snakes’!” actor Joseph Fiennes told Reuters of the scene in “Fiennes Return to the Nile”, a three-part documentary airing on the National Geographic channel this month.

The program marks the 50th anniversary of an expedition that Ranulph, now 74, made up the River Nile and explores whether his actor cousin is cut from the same cloth as the man sometimes known as the greatest living explorer.

The show is at times like an upper-crust version of car show “Top Gear”, with the two Englishmen charging over desert sand dunes in a four-wheel-drive, trading banter in a Cairo traffic jam or learning how to charm deadly snakes.

But if the viewer is in any doubt of Ranulph’s bona fides as an intrepid adventurer, at one point he uses a workbench and a rusty saw to demonstrate how he cut off his own frostbitten fingertips after an ill-fated walk to the North Pole.

For good measure, he shows off what look like tiny cigar stubs but are actually his severed digits. “There’s four,” he tells Joseph. “I don’t know what happened to the other one.”

Joseph, 48, known for “The Handmaid’s Tale” and the title role in the Oscar-winning “Shakespeare in Love”, compared his unflappable elder cousin to the slower but ultimately victorious character in the Aesop fable “The Tortoise and the Hare”.

“I was just racing off and gallivanting up here and into this tunnel and down a pyramid there and actually getting very exhausted at the end of the day,” he told Reuters.

“Ran just has this ability to keep the energy on a very even keel.”

If the program is a success, Ranulph would be keen to take his cousin on another adventure.

“I’m not quite so sure that he’s terribly keen on my idea but there you go,” he said, as Joseph gritted his teeth and replied: “As long as it’s not ice and water, I’m okay.”

(Writing by Robin Pomeroy; Editing by Andrew Cawthorne)

Source: OANN

NBA: Portland Trail Blazers at Cleveland Cavaliers
Feb 25, 2019; Cleveland, OH, USA; Cleveland Cavaliers forward Larry Nance Jr. (22) and Portland Trail Blazers guard Rodney Hood (5) go for a loose ball during the second half at Quicken Loans Arena. Mandatory Credit: Ken Blaze-USA TODAY Sports

February 26, 2019

James Harden had his streak of consecutive 30-point games end at 32, but he and Chris Paul helped the host Houston Rockets withstand a career night from Atlanta Hawks rookie guard Trae Young en route to a 119-111 win on Monday.

Harden posted 28 points despite finishing 0-for-10 from 3-point range. He had an opportunity to pursue an extension of the streak, the second longest in league history behind Wilt Chamberlain’s 65-game run in 1961-62, but he dribbled out the clock with the victory secure.

Harden had sat out the Rockets’ previous game, a Saturday road win over the Golden State Warriors, due to a neck injury. Paul added 20 points, eight assists and six rebounds.

Young paired 36 points on 8-of-12 shooting from 3-point range with eight assists. John Collins chipped in 20 points and 12 rebounds for the Hawks.

76ers 111, Pelicans 110

Tobias Harris scored 29 points while All-Star center Joel Embiid sat out his third consecutive game with a sore left knee as visiting Philadelphia held on to defeat New Orleans.

After Julius Randle scored on a dunk to pull New Orleans within one point with 10.9 seconds left, Philadelphia’s Jonathon Simmons missed two free throws with 9.7 seconds to go, giving the Pelicans a chance to win. However, Jimmy Butler tipped E’Twaun Moore’s 3-point attempt, forcing a miss just before the buzzer.

JJ Redick added 16 points for the 76ers. Jrue Holiday led the Pelicans with 22 points, and Randle had 19 points and 14 rebounds. Anthony Davis, who returned to the lineup after sitting out to rest Saturday night, had 18 points.

Warriors 121, Hornets 110

Klay Thompson scored 26 points, and DeMarcus Cousins had 24 points and 11 rebounds as visiting Golden State beat Charlotte.

The Warriors have now won 16 of their past 18 road games. Cousins might have had his best game since returning from an Achilles injury 14 games ago. He was 9 of 15 from the field and was on the court for most of the Warriors’ runs.

Cody Zeller scored a career-high 28 points to lead the Hornets, hitting 13 of 14 from the field. The Hornets also got 23 points from Kemba Walker.

Suns 124, Heat 121

Devin Booker scored 20 points and dished nine assists as Phoenix snapped a franchise-record, 17-game losing streak with a win at Miami.

Booker, fouled by Josh Richardson with 17.3 seconds left, made two free throws to give Phoenix a 122-121 lead. Wade later missed a 3-point attempt to tie the score, and Phoenix escaped with its first win since beating the Denver Nuggets on Jan. 12.

The Heat have lost six straight home games and haven’t won in Miami since that same date, Jan. 12, since they beat Memphis. Heat center Hassan Whiteside had 29 points and 11 rebounds.

Timberwolves 112, Kings 105

Karl-Anthony Towns scored 34 points and collected 21 rebounds in his return from a concussion to lead Minnesota over Sacramento in Minneapolis.

Towns played in 303 consecutive games before missing the past two due to the concussion. Derrick Rose added 20 points for the Timberwolves, who won for the fourth time in the past five games. Tyus Jones contributed 16 points and eight assists as Minnesota overcame 22 turnovers.

Marvin Bagley III recorded 25 points and 11 rebounds to notch his third straight double-double for the Kings, who finished 1-3 on a four-game road trip. De’Aaron Fox scored 23 points and Buddy Hield had 18 points and eight rebounds for Sacramento, which committed 20 turnovers.

Grizzlies 110, Lakers 105

Mike Conley scored 30 points, and Memphis ended a four-game losing streak by beating visiting Los Angeles.

Jonas Valanciunas had 20 points and 13 rebounds, Avery Bradley scored 15, and Joakim Noah finished with 14 points and 12 rebounds off the bench for Memphis.

LeBron James had 24 points, 12 rebounds and 11 assists, Brandon Ingram scored 32 points, and Kyle Kuzma finished with 22 points for the Lakers, who went 0-2 on a brief road trip. James moved into the NBA’s all-time top 10 in assists, making him the only player on that list and the top 10 in career points.

Clippers 121, Mavericks 112

Montrezl Harrell scored a career-high 32 points and Lou Williams added 21 as Los Angeles’ bench rode to the rescue again in a victory over visiting Dallas.

Danilo Gallinari led the starting five with 20 points as the Clippers won for the fourth time in their past six games and beat the Mavericks at home for the fifth consecutive time.

Luka Doncic recorded a triple-double with 28 points, 10 rebounds and 10 assists, and veteran Dirk Nowitzki added 12 in his second start of the season and 1,500th career game as the Mavericks lost their fifth consecutive game and fell for the sixth time in their past seven games.

Pistons 113, Pacers 109

Andre Drummond powered his way to 26 points and 16 rebounds, Blake Griffin recorded a triple-double, and Detroit collected a win over visiting Indiana.

Detroit has won seven of its last eight, including all three outings since the All-Star break. Griffin racked up 20 points, 10 rebounds and 10 assists. Luke Kennard had 19 points off the bench while Wayne Ellington and Reggie Jackson added 14 points apiece.

Bojan Bogdanovic’s 25 points led Indiana, which had won eight of its previous nine. Reserve Domantas Sabonis had 23 points and seven rebounds, but he hobbled off with an ankle injury with a minute remaining. Darren Collison supplied 21 points and five assists.

Nets 101, Spurs 85

D’Angelo Russell scored 23 points and Brooklyn led most of the way in cruising to victory over San Antonio, which ended its eight-game road trip with a 1-7 record.

Russell added eight assists and seven rebounds after matching a career high Saturday with 40 points in a win at Charlotte. The Nets won for the 15th time in their past 19 home games.

LaMarcus Aldridge scored 26 points for the Spurs, who missed 20 of 24 3-point attempts and set a season low for points. DeMar DeRozan added 23 points.

Trail Blazers 123, Cavaliers 110

Portland squandered most of a 23-point halftime lead, but CJ McCollum and Seth Curry came to the rescue as Portland beat host Cleveland.

In winning their fourth straight, the Trail Blazers never trailed and scored more than 100 points for the 26th straight game. McCollum scored 35 points lead the Trail Blazers. Damien Lillard added 21 points and eight assists, and Jusuf Nurkic recorded 15 points and eight rebounds.

Cedi Osman led the Cavaliers with 27 points, and Jordan Clarkson added 19 off the bench. Kevin Love scored 18 points and grabbed 12 rebounds to notch his third straight double-double. He is five games into his return to the lineup after foot surgery.

Bucks 117, Bulls 106

Malcolm Brogdon and Khris Middleton scored 22 points apiece, and Milwaukee cruised to a victory at Chicago.

Brook Lopez and Nikola Mirotic added 13 points apiece for the Bucks, who won their fifth game in a row. Milwaukee shot 46.2 percent (42 of 91) from the field and knocked down 17 shots from beyond the arc.

Lauri Markkanen and Robin Lopez each had 26 points in a losing effort for the Bulls. Chicago’s three-game win streak ended as the Bucks completed a four-game sweep in the regular-season series.

–Field Level Media

Source: OANN

  • One of the fastest sprinters in NCAA women’s track is a biological male who identifies as a transgender woman.
  • Franklin Pierce University runner CeCe Telfer competed on the men’s track team in early 2018 before switching to the women’s team.
  • Telfer has dominated the NCAA Division II competition and led the women’s team into the top 25 for the first time ever.

A top-ranked runner in NCAA women’s track is dominating the competition and setting records one year after competing as a man at the same level.

Franklin Pierce University senior CeCe Telfer leads the NCAA’s Division II women’s division in the 55 meter dash and 55 meter hurdle events. Telfer led Franklin Pierce’s women’s track team into the top 25 rankings for the first time in program’s history, local newspaper The Keene Sentinel reported in December. The New Hampshire college is ranked 14th in DII.

“Senior CeCe Telfer (Lebanon, N.H.) won three Northeast-10 Conference titles on Sunday, to lead the Franklin Pierce University women’s track & field team and earn Most Outstanding Track Athlete honors at the NE10 Championships, hosted by American International College, on the campus of Smith College,” reads a Feb. 17 article the school’s athletic department posted.

Telfer broke the conference finals record at the meet and qualified for three different events at March’s NCAA championships, the article noted. (RELATED: Male Runners Dominate Girls’ High School Track, Female Runner Calls It ‘Demoralizing’)

Telfer is one of the fastest runners in NCAA women’s track and field at any division — not just at the DII level. Telfer’s best time in the 55 meter dash is tied with the third-fastest runner at the women’s DI level.

Telfer previously ran a variety of events for Franklin Pierce’s men’s team, during most of which time he went by the first name Craig, according to school records.

Telfer competed on Franklin Pierce’s men’s team as recently as January 2018, according to published meet results from the Middlebury Winter Classic in Vermont. By that point Telfer had started using the name CeCe, while still competing on the men’s team.

NCAA policy is that male athletes who identify as transgender can compete on women’s teams if they suppress their testosterone levels for a full calendar year. Otherwise, so-called mixed teams — which have both males and females — can compete in the men’s division, but not in the women’s division, according to NCAA rules.

The NCAA in 2011 published an explainer calling it “not well founded” to assume “that being born with a male body automatically gives a transgender woman an unfair advantage when competing against non-transgender women.”

“Transgender women display a great deal of physical variation, just as there is a great deal of natural variation in physical size and ability among non-transgender women and men. Many people may have a stereotype that all transgender women are unusually tall and have large bones and muscles. But that is not true,” the explainer states.

“A male-to-female transgender woman may be small and slight, even if she is not on hormone blockers or taking estrogen. It is important not to overgeneralize. The assumption that all male-bodied people are taller, stronger, and more highly skilled in a sport than all female-bodied people is not accurate,” it continues.

(Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)

The entrance to the NCAA’s headquarters is seen following an announcement on July 23, 2012 in Indianapolis, Indiana. (Photo by Joe Robbins/Getty Images)

Telfer’s success in the women’s division, which was first highlighted by sports blog Turtleboy Sports, is the latest example of biological males who identify as transgender women piling up victories in women’s sports.

Two biologically male high schoolers in Connecticut, Terry Miller and Andraya Yearwood, are dominating girls’ track in the state. The two teens are among the fastest high school sprinters in the country — though only in the girl’s division.

One of Miller’s and Yearwood’s female competitors, fellow junior Selina Soule, told the Associated Press that it was unfair to force female high schoolers to compete against male athletes.

“We all know the outcome of the race before it even starts; it’s demoralizing,” Soule said. “I fully support and am happy for these athletes for being true to themselves. They should have the right to express themselves in school, but athletics have always had extra rules to keep the competition fair,” she added.

One of the top scorers for Australia’s women’s handball team is Hannah Mouncey, who played for the Australian men’s handball team before transitioning. Mouncey played women’s Australian rules football between transitioning and switching to women’s handball.

Mouncey was banned from the women’s division of the Australian Football League’s women’s division in October 2017 before receiving approval to play  in February 2018.

(Photo by Kelly Defina/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Anna Teague of the Cats is tackled by Hannah Mouncey of the Falcons during the round six VFLW match between Geelong and Darebin at GMHBA Stadium on June 16, 2018 in Geelong, Australia. (Photo by Kelly Defina/AFL Media/Getty Images)

Mouncey abandoned the sport for women’s handball in September 2018, a month after the football league announced tighter restrictions on testosterone levels.

Rachel McKinnon, a biologically male college professor who identifies as a transgender woman, won a women’s cycling world championship in October. McKinnon won the women’s sprint 35-39 age bracket at the 2018 UCI Masters Track Cycling World Championships in Los Angeles.

McKinnon in January 2018 was quoted in USA Today arguing against requiring biological males to suppress testosterone as a requirement for competing against women.

“We cannot have a woman legally recognized as a trans woman in society, and not be recognized that way in sports,” McKinnon told USA Today. “Focusing on performance advantage is largely irrelevant because this is a rights issue. We shouldn’t be worried about trans people taking over the Olympics. We should be worried about their fairness and human rights instead.”

Democratic Minnesota Rep. Ilhan Omar called for an investigation into USA Powerlifting in January after the athletic association announced that male lifters who identify as transgender women aren’t allowed to compete as women.

Omar called it a “myth” that men who identify as transgender women have a “direct competitive advantage” in a Jan. 31 letter she sent to USA Powerlifting on behalf of Jaycee Cooper, a male powerlifter in Omar’s district who identifies as a transgender woman.

Omar copied Minnesota Attorney General Keith Ellison on the letter, “with a recommendation that he investigate this discriminatory behavior.”

Ellison said his office didn’t have the jurisdiction to investigate USA Powerlifting, but recommended that Cooper “file a complaint with the Minnesota Department of Human Rights.”

Follow Hasson on Twitter @PeterJHasson

Content created by The Daily Caller News Foundation is available without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a large audience. For licensing opportunities of our original content, please contact [email protected].

Source: The Daily Caller

David Hookstead | Reporter

The Wisconsin Badgers need to take care of business Tuesday night against Indiana.

My squad is sitting at 19-8, and we all know 20 wins is the tournament benchmark that pretty much secures you a spot in the dance.

With a win tonight, there will no longer be any doubt at all about whether or not we’ll have our ticket punched in March. There’s really not any doubt right now, but with four games remaining, we want to zip it up as quickly as we can.

That’s what my Badgers are going to do when they go on the road against Indiana. The Hoosiers are way more talented than their sub-.500 record would indicate.

Trust me, I don’t want to be playing the Hoosiers. They might have lost more games than expected, but they can hang with anybody. They were 12-2 at one point this season, and even beat Michigan State before the wheels completely fell off. (RELATED: Wisconsin Beats Nebraska 62-51, Khalil Iverson Throws Down Another Monster Dunk)

Again, going on the road to Assembly Hall doesn’t exactly make me feel giddy, but we’re not backing down.

We need to put on a dominating performance, leave with a win and erase any level of doubt that might exist about how talented we are.

There have been a few rough moments this season, but I think they’re behind us. Now, we’re focused on everything to the front, and that includes the journey through March to a championship.

Let’s get after it, gentlemen!

Make sure to tune in at 9:00 p.m. EST on ESPN to catch all the action.

Follow David Hookstead on Twitter

Source: The Daily Caller

Progressive groups are reaching out to 2020 Democratic presidential candidates to support their push to expand the number of Supreme Court justices in order to diminish the current conservative majority.

So far, the drive by the group named ‘Pack the Courts’ is getting two maybes from Democratic presidential contenders and a no from a likely White House hopeful.

IT COULD BE AN HISTORIC YEAR FOR THE SUPREME COURT

“I don’t think we should be laughing at it,” South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg, a Democrat, said last week at an event in Philadelphia.

“Because in some ways it’s no more a shattering of norms than what’s already been done to get the judiciary to where it is today,” added Buttigieg, an Afghanistan War veteran who last month launched a presidential exploratory committee.

Democratic Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand of New York, who’s also launched a presidential exploratory committee, said last month on ‘Pod Save America’ that expanding the court or imposing term limits were “interesting ideas.”

But the move to increase the number of justices on the Supreme Court isn’t flying with likely White House contender Rep. Eric Swalwell.

“I wouldn’t. I think nine is good number. It’s worked for our country,” the four-term Democratic congressman from California told Fox News on Monday after he headlined ‘Politics and Eggs,” a must stop for White House hopefuls in New Hampshire.

“I don’t want to let these extraordinary times that President Trump has put us in lead us to too many extraordinary remedies,” the former prosecutor explained. “I’d rather see us go back to a country of following the law, having qualified justices, and depending on the systems of government that we already have in place, just making those systems more accountable and work better.”

SWALWELL SAYS HE WAS ‘RIGHTFULLY’ SCHOOLED ON TWITTER

‘Pack the Courts’ told Fox News it is meeting with Buttigieg on Monday evening. The group highlighted that it’s in the process of reaching out to Gillibrand, as well as the campaigns of presidential candidates Sens. Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts and Kamala Harris of California.

“We’re in the process of reaching to every declared Democratic contender and hope to both enlighten them to the importance of this strategy for taking back the Court and enlist their support for their strategy,” ‘Pack the Court’ campaign manager Kate Kendell said.

Kendell said her group has received a $500,000 grant from the Palm Center, a progressive-leaning but independent non-partisan think tank in California to fund research on controversial and provocative policy proposals. She added they’re now beginning to raise small-dollar donations from individuals to further fuel their effort to expand the number of high court justices.

The organization is partnering with ‘Demand Justice,’ another progressive group founded last year to try and counter GOP efforts to put more conservatives into federal courts.

‘Demand Justice’ director Brian Fallon – who served as press secretary for Hillary Clinton’s 2016 presidential campaign – highlighted that “we strongly believe that reforming the Court — especially by expanding it — is the cornerstone for re-building American democracy."

But Republicans say advocating to expand the number of Supreme Court justices will make 2020 Democratic contenders appear more extreme to voters come the general election.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

"Democrats are setting themselves up for failure in the general election by agreeing to every single progressive policy touted by the activist left including the Green New Deal, taxes on the wealthy, Medicare for All, and now packing the Supreme Court,” argued Sarah Dolan, executive director of the pro-GOP opposition research group ‘America Rising.’

The Judiciary Act of 1869 established the current number of nine justices for the Supreme Court. A push by President Franklin Roosevelt in 1937 to increase the number of justices failed.

Source: Fox News Politics

Twenty-three former Republican members of Congress have written a letter to current GOP members urging them to pass a joint resolution 'terminating the emergency declared" by President Donald Trump.

In the letter, published Monday by Politico, the lawmakers said that no matter what their policy preferences were or "how deep our loyalties to presidents or party leaders," lawmakers take an oath to put the United States and its Constitution first.

"We who have signed this letter are no longer Members of Congress, but that oath still burns within us," the letter said. "That is why we are coming together to urge those of you who are now charged with upholding the authority of the first branch of government to resist efforts to surrender those powers to a president."

The former lawmakers point out that in Article 1 of the Constitution, section 9, it is stated that the power of the purse rests with Congress.

The second argument asks how much members of Congress are willing to undermine the Constitution "to advance a policy outcome that by all other legitimate means is not achievable."

The letter was signed by former Reps. Steve Bartlett, Texas; Douglas Bereuter, Nebraska, Sherwood Boehlert, New York; Rodney Chandler, Washington; William Clinger Jr., Pennsylvania; Tom Coleman, Missouri;  Mickey Edwards, Oklahoma; David Emery, Maine; Nancy Johnson, Connecticut; James Kolbe, Arizona; James Leach, Iowa; John LeBoutillier, New York; Pete McCloskey, California; Thomas Petri, Wisconsin; Claudine Schneider, Rhode Island; Christopher Shays, Connecticut; Peter Smith, Vermont; Alan Steelman, Texas.

Former Sens. John Danforth, Missouri; Chuck Hagel, Nebraska; Gordon Humphrey, New Hampshire; Richard Lugar, Indiana; Olympia Snowe, Maine, also signed the letter.

Source: NewsMax

NBA: Utah Jazz at Oklahoma City Thunder
Feb 22, 2019; Oklahoma City, OK, USA; Oklahoma City Thunder forward Paul George (13) celebrates after scoring against the Utah Jazz during the second half at Chesapeake Energy Arena. Mandatory Credit: Alonzo Adams-USA TODAY Sports

February 23, 2019

Paul George scored 45 points, including a floater with less than a second left in the second overtime, to lift the Oklahoma City Thunder to a 148-147 win over the visiting Utah Jazz on Friday night.

The Jazz led by one when George grabbed a rebound off a missed shot by Utah’s Joe Ingles with 10 seconds left. George kept the ball until he drove into the lane before releasing the high floater that went cleanly through the net.

Russell Westbrook’s NBA-record streak of 11 consecutive triple-doubles came to an end when he was called for his sixth foul on a charge with 1:09 remaining in the first extra session. Westbrook finished with 43 points, 15 rebounds and eight assists. He hit a season-high six 3-pointers.

Donovan Mitchell led Utah with 38 points, going 14 of 35 from the field.

Raptors 120, Spurs 117

Kawhi Leonard had 25 points and scored the go-ahead dunk after a steal with 15.1 seconds remaining as host Toronto defeated his former team, San Antonio.

Former Raptors guard DeMar DeRozan had 23 points and eight assists in his first game in Toronto since his offseason trade to the Spurs. Marco Belinelli added 21 points on five 3-pointers for San Antonio.

Pascal Siakam added 22 points and six assists for the Raptors, and Serge Ibaka contributed 13 points and 15 rebounds.

Nuggets 114, Mavericks 104

Visiting Denver shook off some rust before drilling Dallas with a third-quarter barrage en route to a victory.

The Nuggets trailed for much of the first half against the Mavericks, who played without Luka Doncic. The rookie sensation is day-to-day due to a sore right knee.

Nikola Jokic posted a team-high 19 points along with 13 rebounds and eight assists for Denver, and Paul Millsap had 17 points and 13 rebounds. Dallas rookie Jalen Brunson, starting for Doncic, finished with a game-high and career-best 22 points.

Bulls 110, Magic 109

Lauri Markkanen hit two free throws with 1.5 seconds remaining to give Chicago a road victory that snapped Orlando’s five-game winning streak.

The Bulls were down by one when Markkanen was fouled on a 3-point attempt. After missing the first attempt, Markkanen sank the next two free throws to put the Bulls ahead, and the Magic could not get a shot off before the buzzer at the other end.

Markkanen led Chicago with 25 points and 11 rebounds, and Zach LaVine had 22 points and six assists. Evan Fournier had 22 points, and Nikola Vucevic added 19 points, 13 rebounds and seven assists for Orlando.

Pistons 125, Hawks 122

Thon Maker drilled a tiebreaking 3-pointer with 17.1 seconds remaining, and visiting Detroit held on to beat Atlanta.

Maker took a pass from Reggie Jackson and calmly made the trey, his third of the night, giving him nine points for the game. Jackson had 32 points, five rebounds and eight assists as the Pistons won for the fifth time in six games.

Atlanta, which has lost five of its past six, got 30 points and 10 assists from Trae Young.

Pacers 126, Pelicans 111

Tyreke Evans gave Indiana the lead for good with a 3-pointer late in the third quarter and the Pacers scored the first eight points of the final period to begin to pull away from New Orleans in Indianapolis.

In winning for the seventh time in their past eight games, the Pacers led for a total of just 14 seconds before Evans hit his tiebreaking 3-pointer with three seconds remaining in the third period for a 97-94 lead. Wesley Matthews hit six 3-pointers to account for a majority of his team-high 24 points for Indiana.

Embattled big man Anthony Davis had 15 points and eight rebounds for the Pelicans but was limited to just 20 minutes.

Timberwolves 115, Knicks 104

Reserve Derrick Rose scored 20 points as Minnesota overcame the absence of All-Star center Karl-Anthony Towns to earn a victory over New York, which had its team-record home losing streak reach 18 games.

Towns was placed in the NBA’s concussion protocol before the game and missed the first game of his four-year career. He was involved in a traffic accident in the Minneapolis area Thursday when he was headed to the airport. Taj Gibson started for Towns and added 19 points and 10 rebounds for Minnesota.

The Knicks tied the 2013-14 Philadelphia 76ers for the second-longest home skid in NBA history. New York, which got 20 points apiece from Allonzo Trier and Damyean Dotson, lost for the 19th time in its past 20 games overall.

Hornets 123, Wizards 110

Kemba Walker had 27 points, 11 assists and five rebounds, and Charlotte snapped a two-game losing streak with a victory over Bradley Beal and visiting Washington.

The Hornets trailed by as many as 12 in the first quarter, but they regrouped to lead at halftime and then pushed the lead up to 16 in the third quarter. Beal put on a shooting display and finished with 46 points, five shy of his career high. He was 16 of 25 from the field with four 3-pointers.

The Hornets shuffled their lineup for the first time all season with forward Miles Bridges getting his first career start, guard Jeremy Lamb going to the bench, and Nicolas Batum moving from forward to guard. The move worked, as Batum scored 20, Lamb 16 and Bridges 14.

Clippers 112, Grizzlies 106

Reserve forward Montrezl Harrell scored 19 of his 30 points in the first half, and Danilo Gallinari added 23 as visiting Los Angeles built a big early lead, then held on to beat Memphis.

Lou Williams scored 18 points off the bench for the Clippers, who won for the fourth time in their past six games, with five of those contests on the road.

Mike Conley scored 25 points and handed out 10 assists, and Joakim Noah added a season-high 22 points plus 11 rebounds for Memphis.

–Field Level Media

Source: OANN

As more Democrats enter the 2020 presidential race, many of the candidates are embracing a progressive issue they think will get them votes: universal healthcare.

“If you look at national polls and you ask people the most important issue that you think faces us in this country, No. 1 is healthcare,” said Steffen Schmidt, a political science professor at Iowa State University.

The issue is controversial and voters seem split on whether they support it. A recent Fox News poll shows that among registered voters 47 percent favor a national health insurance program.

Still, some candidates are rallying behind Medicare-for-all and even making it a central theme of their campaign.

“I will always support the philosophy of Medicare for all,” Sen. Sherrod Brown of Ohio told a crowd of voters in Dubuque, Iowa recently. “One of the first things I’d do if I am the president is pass Medicare at 55 or 50.”

At least eight out of 11 of the declared candidates support Medicare for all.

HOW MUCH WOULD ‘MEDICARE FOR ALL" COST? DEMOCRATS’ HEALTH CARE PLAN EXPLAINED

"I think that Americans deserve universal healthcare. I think citizens of most developing countries already enjoy this and I think it’s crazy to suggest that Americans shouldn’t be able to enjoy that same right," said South Bend, Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg

More than 50 million people across the country are enrolled in Medicare, which provides health care for older Americans and persons with disabilities, costing an estimated $700 billion, according to data from Statista.

A George Mason University study puts the cost of ‘Medicare-for-all’ at more than $32 trillion over the course of the next decade. The anticipated cost is part of the reason why GOP leaders are against the idea.

Republicans said by embracing such a controversial topic, Democrats will hurt themselves.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

“If Democrats want to force their incumbents in suburban districts to campaign for re-election on rationed care, abolishing people’s existing employer-provided health benefits in exchange for less medical coverage, reduced medical freedom and significant tax increases, we are happy to let them do so," said Wes Enos, chairman of the Polk County Republicans. "It will present a very clear contrast with the Republican message of lower taxes, job creation, economic prosperity and greater medical freedom.”

Not all Democrats running for president in the next election cycle agree with Medicare-for-all. Sen. Amy Klobuchar, D-Minn., believes in creating more options for consumers.

"What we would like to do is expand to have more options for people and I think that will bring prices down," she said. "And one way to do it is to expand Medicaid or Medicare."

BEWARE: MEDICARE-FOR-ALL IS FOOL’S GOLD

In key early states like Iowa, healthcare is a big issue for some voters.

“That’s one of my biggest interests this election,” Tiffanie Hodges said at a campaigning event for Cory Booker in Des Moines, Iowa early February. “I think it’s really important.”

It’s unclear whether the issue will help or hurt the candidates.

"Medicare works fairly well," Schmidt said. "We just have to make sure that we don’t allow the expenses of it to get greater than the income that’s flowing in."

Source: Fox News Politics

NBA: All Star-Media Day
Feb 16, 2019; Charlotte, NC, USA; Team Lebron forward Anthony Davis of the New Orleans Pelicans (23) speaks during the NBA All-Star Media Day at Bojangles Coliseum. Mandatory Credit: Jeremy Brevard-USA TODAY Sports

February 22, 2019

New Orleans forward Anthony Davis will play in Friday’s game at Indiana, Pelicans coach Alvin Gentry confirmed Thursday.

In the final game before the All-Star break on Feb. 14, Davis left the Pelicans’ victory over the Oklahoma City Thunder with a shoulder contusion. Davis played five minutes in the All-Star Game for Team LeBron and scored five points before taking himself out of the game as a precaution.

Davis, who requested a trade last month, is averaging 28.1 points, 12.9 rebounds, 4.2 assists and 2.5 blocked shots per game this season.

The NBA has denied reports that the league threatened to fine the Pelicans $100,000 per game if the team chooses to sit a healthy Davis.

–Chandler Parsons is set to take the floor for the Memphis Grizzlies on Friday, head coach J.B. Bickerstaff announced, and it will be only the fourth game of the season for the forward.

Parsons played in the first three games of the season, but has not seen action since Oct. 22, when he played just six minutes and did not score against the Utah Jazz. He had a partial meniscus tear in his left knee, which was originally believed to be bad enough to keep him out the entire season.

The Grizzlies could use as many minutes as Parsons can give them in Friday’s home game against the Los Angeles Clippers. Marc Gasol was moved to the Toronto Raptors at the trade deadline earlier this month and forward Kyle Anderson is not expected to play Friday because of a shoulder injury.

–Lowering the draft-eligible age requirement in the NBA from 19 to 18 is one step closer to reality after the league submitted a proposal to the National Basketball Players Association, USA Today reported.

The report, citing a source, also indicated that the union and executive director Michele Roberts plan to review the proposal Monday. The timing, according to USA Today, does not coincide with the knee injury suffered Wednesday night by Duke freshman Zion Williamson, the expected No. 1 pick on the 2019 NBA Draft.

The reported proposal is the first step in making the change by the 2022 draft. Players would be allowed to enter the NBA right out of high school.

–While LeBron James’ exploits on the basketball court have always been worth watching, now his HBO show “The Shop” is also earning must-see status.

The second season of James’ show, which will debut March 1, is scheduled to have both Anthony Davis, who has said he would like to be traded from the New Orleans Pelicans, and wide receiver Antonio Brown, who is trying to work his way off the Pittsburgh Steelers’ roster.

James and co-host Maverick Carter reportedly filmed a segment for the show with Davis this past weekend amid All-Star Game festivities.

–Charlotte Hornets forward Frank Kaminsky is trying to secure a buyout to become a free agent, Sporting News reported.

The No. 9 pick in the 2015 NBA Draft, Kaminsky is averaging a career-low 5.2 points and 10.8 minutes per game during his fourth season with Charlotte.

First-year Hornets head coach James Borrego has kept the 7-footer out of the lineup in 31 of the team’s first 57 games. Since playing 16-plus minutes against the Dallas Mavericks on Jan. 2, Kaminsky has appeared in only four of Charlotte’s last 20 games for a total of about 26 minutes.

–Field Level Media

Source: OANN

Democrats have criticized President Trump for his declaration of a national emergency at the southern border, but some say he is setting a precedent that would allow future Democratic administrations to declare national emergencies to advance left-leaning policies.

Last week, presidential hopefuls Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., and Indiana Mayor Pete Buttigieg both tweeted that climate change is an emergency while border wall construction is not, although they stopped short of saying that they’d declare a national emergency if elected. Sen. Warren also charged that gun violence and the nation’s opioid epidemic should also be considered emergencies.

Trump’s declaration is facing a slew of legal challenges and backlash in Congress. Most Democratic presidential contenders are distancing themselves from the idea and condemning the president.

PRESIDENT TRUMP’S NATIONAL EMERGENCY DECLARATION SPARKS PROTESTS

"Republicans wouldn’t have tolerated this if Obama did it," Sen. Cory Booker, D-NJ, told Fox News at a campaign event in Portsmouth, New Hampshire. "And they shouldn’t tolerate it when Donald Trump is doing it."

Sen. Cory Booker speaks at a house party in Nashua, NH. The Senator from New Jersey condemned Trump's national emergency declaration. (ROB DIRIENZO / FOX NEWS)

Sen. Cory Booker speaks at a house party in Nashua, NH. The Senator from New Jersey condemned Trump’s national emergency declaration. (ROB DIRIENZO / FOX NEWS)

In her trip to New Hampshire, Sen. Kamala Harris, D-Calif., joined Booker yesterday in bashing the president’s declaration, calling the move "completely unnecessary."

“This is a crisis of his own making because it was a campaign pledge that took heat and propelled him to victory," Sen. Harris told the audience. "He feels the need to keep reciting what is a lie.”

WHAT IS A ‘NATIONAL EMERGENCY,’ AND HOW CAN TRUMP USE IT TO FUND BORDER WALL?

A recent Fox News poll found that 63 percent of voters consider climate change an emergency, the same number of those who think that about border security. Meanwhile, opioid addiction dwarfs that: 87 percent consider it an emergency or major problem.

Neil Levesque, the executive director of the New Hampshire Institute of Politics, said Democrats could seize on the precedent, especially if it holds up in court.

“The next president, if it is a Democrat, could use this to their advantage and politicize certain national emergencies as well, specifically on things like gun control or climate changes," Levesque said. "That could be a real worry to conservative voters.”

Democratic voters, however, are mixed on the idea of making a national emergency declaration a campaign promise.

"I am a bit wary of granting that much power to one individual," said Devon Kristen at a Booker campaign event. "Because in the current hands, I think it’s in the hands of the wrong individual."

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

"I would feel extremely positive," said Sydney Paluch, a Dartmouth College student attending a recent town hall event for Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, "Considering surprising that those are real, statistical documented issues. Not a manufactured one."

That same Fox News poll also found that 56 percent of Americans oppose the president’s declaration, while 38 percent support it.

Source: Fox News Politics


Current track

Title

Artist