Medicare

Tim Pearce | Energy Reporter

Women are earning four-year college degrees at a higher rate but working at a rate significantly lower than men in the U.S., Axios reports.

Adults in the U.S. are overall more educated now than at any other point in history, with 34.6 percent of women and 33.7 percent of men holding four-year college degrees. In workforce participation, men still have a substantial edge on women 69.2 percent to 56.9 percent, according to Bureau of Labor Statistics data.

Men with a bachelor’s, master’s or professional degree are more likely to be working than women with the same level of education, Axios reports. (RELATED: Prime-Age Labor Force Dropouts May Never Return To Work, Fed Paper Says)

Men are more likely to begin working sooner and work longer hours than women. According to a December 2018 Harvard study, the gender pay gap between men and women is due to men’s greater willingness to work overtime at higher wages. Women value a safer and more predictable schedule.

The percentage of women in the workplace has declined alongside men for several years, worrying experts that declining workforce participation will worsen growing deficits in Social Security and Medicare. The Baby Boomer generation, which propped both programs up when they were founded, is now retiring and placing greater financial strain on the systems.

U.S. President Donald Trump listens as his daughter, White House senior adviser Ivanka Trump, speaks during a campaign rally on the eve of the U.S. midterm election in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., November 5, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

U.S. President Donald Trump listens as his daughter, White House senior adviser Ivanka Trump, speaks during a campaign rally on the eve of the U.S. midterm election in Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., November 5, 2018. REUTERS/Carlos Barria

In 1985, the United States ranked second in women participation in the workforce. By 2016, the U.S. was ranked ninth, passed by countries such as France, Japan and the United Kingdom, according to the International Monetary Fund (IMF).

The IMF report attributed the trend to European policies that guarantee women more flexibility with longer maternity leave and greater access to childcare.

Ivanka Trump is leading a White House effort to adopt similar polices in the U.S. She met with lawmakers Wednesday to discuss potential legislation to be introduced to Congress, pushing paid family leave policies.

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Source: The Daily Caller

Over a dozen states don’t provide Medicaid coverage for medication abortions where funding is permitted under federal and state law, according to a U.S. Government Accountability Office report.

At least 13 states are denying insurance coverage for eligible medication abortions even in the cases of rape, incest or to save the mother’s life, according to the January report. The Hyde Amendment prohibits federal funds from paying for abortion except in cases of incest, rape or to save the mother’s life.

Idaho, Utah, Texas, Alabama, Arkansas, Colorado, Florida, Kentucky, Missouri, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Rhode Island and the District of Columbia provide coverage for surgical abortions where federal funding is permitted but do not provide coverage for medication abortions, according to the GAO report.

Denial rates ranged from approximately 4 percent to 90 percent, the report says. About half of those states reported denial rates higher than 60 percent.

South Dakota “does not cover abortions in cases of rape or incest, as required by federal law, but [the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services] has not taken any action in 25 years to ensure the state’s compliance,” the report reads. “[D]espite the requirement to do so under federal law,” 14 states reported a failure to cover Mifeprex, according to the report.

Mifeprex is an abortion-inducing drug used in medication abortions up until 70 days in pregnancy. The drug is taken in combination with misoprostol to end early pregnancies. (RELATED: Physician Says There Isn’t Single Scenario Where Late-Term Abortion Protects Mother’s Health)

“Federal law permits states to categorically exclude a participating manufacturer’s drugs from coverage under a few limited exceptions,” according to the report. Mifeprex does not meet any of the exceptions that would permit states to exclude the drug from coverage, CMS officials told the accountability office, according to Rewire.News.

Some states gave reasons for their denials, including rejections of life endangerment claims where recipients did not provide an address. Seven states, however, denied no payments, according to the report. Women made no eligible abortion coverage claims for five straight years in four states.

Fifteen states provide abortion coverage under Medicaid, according to a Jan. 9 Guttmacher Institute report. Twenty-six states restrict abortion coverage in private health insurance plans, the report indicates.

The Guttmacher Institute is “a research and policy organization committed to advancing sexual and reproductive health and rights globally,” according to its Twitter handle.

The District of Columbia and 33 states prohibit state funds from covering abortion except in cases where federal funds are permitted, the Guttmacher Institute reported.

States such as Louisiana and Tennessee offer no coverage for abortion, a February Guttmacher Institute report revealed.

Demonstrators rally in support of abortion and other women’s rights, and against President Trump’s administration, on March 8, 2017, International Women’s Day, in Washington, D.C. Shutterstock/Rena Schild

“States are supposed to be covering a limited number of abortions under Medicaid but are not even doing that,” Democratic Colorado Rep. Diana DeGette said, The New York Times reported Sunday.

DeGette requested an investigation into abortion coverage across states, prompting the government’s report.

CMS did not immediately respond to The Daily Caller News Foundation’s request for comment.

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Content created by The Daily Caller News Foundation is available without charge to any eligible news publisher that can provide a large audience. For licensing opportunities of our original content, please contact [email protected].

Source: The Daily Caller

Report: Bernie Sanders Records Campaign Announcement Video

Bernie Sanders has recorded a campaign video in which he says he’s running for president in 2020, Politico reports, citing two people familiar. It’s unclear when, or whether, the video will be released, Politico says.

Sanders, 77, an independent senator from Vermont who caucuses with Democrats, said earlier this week he would introduce a Medicare for All bill “fairly soon.” In the event of a campaign announcement, he would be joining a widening group of presidential hopefuls including Minnesota Senator Amy Klobuchar, Senator Kamala Harris of California, Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts, and Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey

Sanders spokeswoman Sarah Ford didn’t respond to a request for comment from Politico. In January, Politico reported that the Sanders team was in talks with film-making company Means of Production, which created New York Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez’s campaign video in the 2018 midterm election.

Source: NewsMax Politics

The REAL News of the Effects of “Medicare-for-all” is an eye opener to those that want to support it Americans broadly support a “Medicare-for-all” plan of the kind being pushed by a host of Democratic 2020 hopefuls, according to a recent poll — but that support nosedives once they are informed that it may result in […]


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